The need for collecting eggs for the Wounded Soldiers in the hospitals in England and France has come to an end

Clewer had contributed thousands of eggs to help feed wounded soldiers.

Clewer

The following remarkable Egg Report has been sent for insertion by Miss Durant:-

Now that the need for collecting eggs for the Wounded Soldiers in the hospitals in England and France has come to an end, I should like to express my thanks to all those in Clewer who have so kindly assisted in the good work by giving eggs and money.

Since I commenced collecting in March, 1915, Clewer has contributed 7,890 eggs and £56 11s. 0d. in cash, and I especially wish to thank the children of Clewer Green Schools, who have collected 462 eggs and £49 1s. 9d. towards the result.

M. DOROTHY DURANT,

Collector for Clewer.

Clewer parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)

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Eggs are invaluable when wounded men are not able to take any substantial food

Eggs were a welcome gift for wounded soldiers.

Children’s Egg Service

The following letter has been received from the Secretary of the Care and Comforts Committee:

Dear Mr Britton

I am writing for the Care and Comforts Committee to ask you to thank the children for the quantity of beautiful eggs they sent us for the wounded men in our hospitals. A number of men have just come from France, and I know they will greatly appreciate the thoughtfulness of the children. There are many cases in which eggs are invaluable when men are not able to take any substantial food.

Yours sincerely

H Kensington
Hon. Secretary

62 Minster Street, Reading

Reading St. John parish magazine, May 1918 (D/P172/28A/24)

The lives of these PoWs seem to depend on the food sent them from England

PoWs depended on food sent from home.

Mrs. Barnett has undertaken to collect eggs for the Reading Branch of the National Egg Collection for Wounded Soldiers. Gifts of eggs will be gratefully received at the Vicarage.

The Vicar has had an appeal to help to collect for the Royal Berkshire Regiment Prisoners of War Fund on May 11th. 1918.

The Care Committee are responsible for sending parcels of food to 405 prisoners and bread to 473, the cost of which exceeds £14,000 per annum — £2000 of which is spent on bread. This is a very urgent matter as the lives of these men seem to depend on the food sent them from England. The Vicar will gladly receive donations, large and small, and if they are sent to him before May 11th he will forward them to the Committee as a gift from Bracknell.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, May 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/5)

The need for eggs is greater than ever

So many people kept chickens that the gift of eggs to hospitals for the wounded was an obvious patriotic offering. Some people had more to give away than others. Three ladies in Early had donated over 1000 eggs each over a two year period.

NATIONAL EGG COLLECTION

Eggs are collected every Thursday at the School, for the sick and wounded. During the two years ending in May, over 9,000 have been given by the residents of Earley.

Our chief contributors are: Mrs Hissey, 1,200; Miss Montizambert, 1139; Mrs Bastow, 1,041; Mr G Hatch, 971; Mr J Lewington, 777; Mrs W Hatch, 733; Mrs P Davis, 630; Mrs Wooridge, 421; Mrs Dance, 389; Mrs Dunlop, 262; Mr F Johnson, 260; Mr Culham, 246; Mrs Hallaway, 218; Mrs G Webb, 205; Misses Beauchamp, 150; Mrs W Nash, 124; Mrs Andrews, 100.

Among those who have given less than 100 are, Mrs G Cane, Mrs Cottrell, Mrs Hutt, Mrs H King, Miss Lea, Miss Liddiard, Miss Nickes, Mrs Prior, Mrs Shotton, Mrs Slaughter, Mrs Whitworth.

The Collector for this district is Mrs de Bathe, of Hartley Court, and she writes to say how very grateful the people at the hospitals are for the eggs, and that the need for them is greater than ever. There is to be a Flag Day on July 14th when Mrs de Bathe hopes there will be a good response especially from this district.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Eggs and coins

Cookham children were giving eggs, while those in Crowthorne were asked to join a war savings scheme.

Cookham Alwyn Road School
March 2nd 1917

The school children have this week contributed to the “Soldiers’ Egg Fund”.

Crowthorne C.E. School
March 2nd 1917

An attempt is being made to form a War Savings Certificate association.

Cookham Alwyn Road School log book (88/SCH/18/1, p. 291); Crowthorne C.E. School log book (D/P102B/28/3, p. 9)

Doing the repairs of a family of six

Berkshire children were supporting the war effort.


October 19th 1916

Lower Sandhurst Council School

To-day being “Our Day” Red Cross Fund, the School Red Cross Box was opened and found to contain £1 – 18 – 6. This amount was forwarded to the Local Organiser for inclusion in the Sandhurst Contribution.

This amount included, our ‘War Contribution’ has now reached the sum of nine pounds five shillings; and 1017 eggs have been sent to the National Egg Collection.’

Alwyn Road School
A collection was taken in school today on behalf of “Our Day” the British Red Cross and Order of St John.

Stoke Road School, Slough

A good many exhibits for the economy exhibition have been received from the parents of children attending this school. A noteworthy exhibit is a pair of boots repaired by a boy of sixteen whose father is in the Army. In a note his mother says he is doing the repairs of a family of six.

Wescott Road School, Wokingham

The Head Master left school at 3pm in order to attend the War Pensions Committee Meeting.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 377);
Cookham Alwyn Road School log book (88/SCH/18/1); Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1, p. 389); Wokingham Wescott Road School log book (C/EL87, p. 168)

Reported wounded and missing long ago in Gallipoli

Children and adults in Bracknell contributed what they could to the war.

EGGS FOR THE WOUNDED.

During the last seven months from January, 1916, 1,106 eggs have been sent to Reading for the National Egg collection.

I should like to take this opportunity to thank on behalf of the Soldiers all those who have sent eggs, and also Mr. Barnard, who has most kindly conveyed them to Reading free of charge. I hope that everyone will continue to send as many eggs as possible each week either direct to the Vicarage or to Mr. May, High Street.

A.M. BARNETT.

WAR WORK.

Names of some of the Bracknell Children who have lately sent knitting to the War Work Depot:- Ethel Brant, Alice Cheney, Phoebe White, Amelia Quick, Phyllis Gough, Dorothy Gale, Mary Wera, May Rance, Grace Fowler, Evelyn Townshend, Margery Metson, Ethel Morley, D. Townshend.

We regret the news has now come through that Jack Franks, who was reported wounded and missing long ago in Gallipoli, is dead. He was one of our choir boys, and though it is now some years since the family left Bracknell, many of us remember him very well, and much sympathy is felt for his mother.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

510 eggs collected

Egg collection was going well in Sandhurst, while a Reading teacher was likely to join up.

Lower Sandhurst, May 11th 1916
Was able to forward 510 eggs to the Nat. Collection of Eggs for Wounded Soldiers.

Reading, 11th May 1916
Mr Webster absent all day, with regard to his future as a soldier.

Lower Sandhurst School Log Book (C/EL66/1, p. 361); Reading St Giles Boys School log book (R/ES2/9, p. 232)

Collecting eggs again

Sandhurst children helped to feed the wounded again:

May 8th 1916

As last year we commence collecting eggs to be sent to the wounded soldiers in hospital.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p.361)

A window to keep alive for ever the memory of their gallant service

The tragedy of two brothers killed within a week of one another in the first few months of the war led to a beautiful stained glass window at Holy Trinity Bracknell.

The Church has been beautified by the erection of a new window which has been given by Mrs. Van Neck in memory of her two sons who have fallen in the war.

Under one window there is the following inscription: “To the Glory of God and in loving memory of Philip Van Neck, Lieut. Grenadier Guards, who fell in action at Kriessk, Belgium, on 26th October, 1914, aged 27”, and under the other, “To the Glory of God and in loving memory of Charles Hylton Van Neck, Lieut. Northumberland Fusiliers, who fell in action at Herlies, France, on 20th October, 1914, aged 21.”

It will be seen that these two young officers were both killed in the same week; they were well known to us in Bracknell when they were boys, and we greatly appreciate the honour of having this window in our Church to keep alive for ever the memory of their gallant service.

The collection of eggs for the wounded is going on apace. Last week 12 dozen were sent, more than half of which were brought by the scholars of the Ranelagh School. A few came from Bullbrook School and the rest from various contributors. Now that the eggs are plentiful, we hope to keep up a good supply. Anyone who wishes to contribute an egg or more will remember that they should be sent to Miss Avice Barnett at the Vicarage by 12 o’clock on Monday, or to Mr. May, Corn Dealer, High Street. They are sent to the National Egg Collection for the wounded (Reading Branch). We have to thank Mr. Barnard for conveying them to Reading free of charge.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, April 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/4)

Shot through the hand

There was worrying news for several Winkfield families, while the village’s children were busy collecting eggs.

We regret to have to record this month that three of our men have been wounded. 2nd Lieut, R. Hayes-Sadler was shot through the hand, Sergeant James Thurmer is seriously wounded in the right arm and thigh, and Pte. Walker Woodage slightly wounded. We hear that all three are going on well and trust that the anxiety of their relatives will soon be allayed.

We learn that Pte. Robert Thurmer and Pte. William Faithful have gone to Mesopotamia and that Pte. James Knight has just gone to the front in Flanders; let us remember them in our prayers.

Our children did their part well in the Children’s Special Week (February 21st to 28th) of effort to help forward the National Egg Collection for wounded Soldiers, and besides collecting 40 eggs they raised the sum of £3 12s. 6½d.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, April 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/4)

Each one of us who is safe at home should do his bit to uphold those in the danger zone

Bracknell people were contributing in various ways. Hilda Mount, who co-ordinated funds to support British PoWs, was the wife of William (later Sir William) Mount, MP for Newbury, and is the great grandmother of current Prime Minister David Cameron.

C.E.M.S BRANCH INTERCESSION SERVICES.

Attention is called to this service of our own, and continued at our request, on Friday in the Parish Church, at 9.15p.m. When we think of the self-sacrifice of our men at the Front, for our sakes, for our families and for our Country, it goes without saying that each one of us who is safe at home should do his bit to uphold those in the danger zone. Not one of our members should be avoidably absent from these services.

BERKSHIRE REGIMENT PRISONERS’ FUND.

Contributions in small sums are collected by Miss J.E. Barnett, Oaklea, and sent at the beginning of each month to Mrs. Mount, the wife of one of our Berkshire M.P.’s, for the benefit of those Prisoners who are dependent on gifts sent to them from England. The smallest contribution is very welcome.

EGG COLLECTION FOR HOSPITALS.

Miss Avice Barnett has been receiving a few eggs all through the winter and sends them to Reading every Friday for the benefit of the wounded soldiers. Now that eggs are getting more plentiful she is receiving more, and in the future they will be sent to Mrs. de Bathe at Reading, who after sending 500 a week to the Reading War Hospitals, despatches the rest to the National Egg Collection, whence they are distributed to Hospitals abroad and at home as they are needed. The number required is so great that the need can never fully be supplied.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, March 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/3)

Fresh eggs for the wounded

A Wokingham church called its members to collect eggs – highly nutritious and easy to slip down – for wounded soldiers.

National Egg Collection.
There is a great need of fresh eggs for the sick and wounded. There are some who would like to help in this matter, and so a basket is placed in church on Sundays in which offerings of eggs or money may be put.

Wokingham St Sebastian magazine, September 1915 (D/P154C/28A/1)

“Butcher’s meat has to go”

Two more Cranbourne men had fallen in the war, while others had followed them to the front. Meanwhile those left behind were sending eggs for the wounded, and taking the advice of an almost certainly fictional letter in the church magazine to save food and money.

We have to record, with much regret, the deaths of Sergeant Tom Hillyer, and Private James Andrews.

Sergeant Hillyer was killed in action in April. He was well known in the Parish as a Postman and as the winner of several prizes for walking at the Sports of the Windsor Forest Athletic Club. When the war began he at once enlisted in the Canadian contingent and was very soon promoted to be sergeant. He had seen service in the Egyptian campaigns and in the South African War, and held four medals.

James Andrews was gardener at Springhill and being reservist had to join his regiment at once. After eight months fighting he was seriously wounded and died of his wounds early in May. He was a much respected member of our branch of the C.E.M.S. and a regular communicant. Memorial services were held in our Church for both of these soldiers who died for their King and Country.

The following names are to be added to the list (published last month) of those who are serving in His Majesty’s forces.

Charles Goodchild, Suffolk Regiment.
Charles Peters, Lance-Corporal, Mechanical Transport.
Ernest Hawthorne, Royal Engineers.
Arthur Robert Hatcher, Royal Engineers.
Frank Edmonds, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.
Albert John Edmonds, Berkshire Yeomanry.

Several in this Parish are contributing to the egg collection which is being made all over the country for our wounded soldiers. Miss K. Meyer is the local Secretary and takes the gifts each week to Windsor, where they are packed and sent to headquarters in London, from which place they are sent to our hospitals in England and France. Since April 30th, 1485 eggs have been given by residents in Cranbourne and Winkfield, but during the last month the number sent each week has been getting less. The Secretary wishes it to be known that even one egg a week, or one a fortnight will be gratefully received, for “every mickle makes a muckle.” She would be glad to receive the eggs on Thursdays, as she takes them to Windsor every Friday.

We have seen an interesting letter and as it seemed to contain some most valuable information, we have persuaded the writer to let us publish it in our Magazine. It is too long to print the whole of it in this month’s issue and so it will be “continued in our next.”-

MRS. SMITH TO MRS. ROBINSON.

“DEAR MRS. ROBINSON,”

This comes hoping you are well, as it leaves me at present, but terribly worried over this cruel war. It’s hard enough to get on now that work is plenty. What will it be when the war is over and hundreds of thousands of soldiers come back to work and take the situations which are being kept open for them. And the bill there will be to pay. The Parliament is spending 3 millions of pounds every day on the war, and you don’t suppose they are finding the money in their cellars where Guy Faux was hid. No, my husband says they are running up a big debt, and who do you suppose will pay it, he says. Why, he says, it is us the working people will have to pay it, at least it will come hardest on us. So those who are making a little more just now (which is not you or me) should be saving every penny beyond their bare living, and not fancying themselves rich.

It is a mercy I learned to make the most of things, and I may mention some of the things I am doing now. First of all, butcher’s meat has to go. No bits of steak and one-and-five per lb. Even the gentry are not buying such a lot of butcher’s meat just now, so that there may be more to go round for the poorer classes. Any meat I can buy must not be choice parts. If it is nicely stewed any part can be made good, especially just now, with vegetables not so hard to get. Onions one must have. They are most wholesome and they make anything go down. Brown a bit of onion in a saucepan with a bit of dripping and a good dust of flour. When it is all brown, add a little water and stir till it boils, and makes a thin sauce. Drop in the meat and a tea spoon of vinegar, also a little pepper. Cook it slowly till the meat is soft. You can keep putting in any bits of vegetables, also potato. When you dish it up, you get back everything you have put in- no waste. Of course the pot must be filled up with more water if the meat is getting too dry.

As for potatoes, I should feel ashamed of myself if I was to peel them. The Irish, who know what potatoes are, think the skin of a baked potato the best part. Any way, if boiled in their skins you get much more flavour, and can strip off the skins as you eat them. Peeling them in the old way wastes one pound in every four pounds. It is wise to buy what potatoes you can, as they are good food, except for babies, and make other things go further. If I ever run to a rasher, I fry some cold potato with it, as a saving, and as for ‘sausages and mashed,’ the potato is half the battle.

Sausages are a help just now. Put them in a pie dish and over them a batter made with flour, milk, and water, and one egg, and they go a long way as ‘toad in the hole’; or put them in the dish, covered with potatoes and bake like a pie. If only plainly fried they are too dear. Fish, when you can get it, will save the meat. Plaice, haddock, cod or hake can be made quite tasty. Put on a tin, and sprinkle with vinegar, pepper and salt; cover it with a bit of clean paper and put a bit of dripping round. Bake it till it is ready to leave the bone. Baste it through the paper whenever you have time. Serve it with the liquor which runs out, which is quite tasty.”

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

Pray for our enemies, despite their brutality

The church of St Peter’s in Earley encouraged prayer for the enemy, despite their horror at the reports of brutality. Meanwhile, even the very poor were offering up eggs for the wounded who could eat no solid food.

Prayers for the War.

‘That men ought always to pray and not to faint’ is a divine direction which we greatly need our prayers concerning the war, both public and private. The enemy has been behaving with incredible neglect of accepted international obligations, such as restrain brutality in warfare. We are exasperated and embittered. At home there has been a good deal of complaining and mutual recrimination. Our temper is strained, and our power of holding together. Whatever else the Christian Church can do, it ought to be importunate and urgent in prayer. Prayer is our true weapon, not bitterness nor mutual reviling. We need to pray with all our soul –

1. For our country, and all classes in it, that they may behave worthily and in a spirit of thorough self-sacrifice: and that the spirit of penitence for our common and personal sins may be deepened in our approach to God;
2. For the good hand of our God upon us in the areas of war, guiding our leaders, inspiring the men, protecting them in danger, granting us victory;
3. For the wounded, the prisoners and the bereaved;
4. For our enemies and especially for the German-speaking church, that it may open its heart to the Spirit of Christ.
5. Let us commend to God those who have fallen, that He will so deal with them in the unseen world that ‘they may find mercy of the Lord at the great Day.’

I am sure, increasingly sure, that the best method of public prayer is that of bidding to prayer – with sufficient deliberation of speech – at the Holy Eucharist, and from the pulpit after sermon at Evensong, getting the people to kneel down, and allowing pauses for silent prayer. There is no special prayer for prisoners of war put out by authority. But there is the prayer in the Litany ‘for all prisoners and captives’: and before beginning the Litany we can from time to time call attention to this clause, and make a pause after the response.

Notice as to weekday services.

The celebration of Holy Communion with special Intention for the War will, as usual, be at 7am on Tuesdays, and may we remind our readers that at this Service our list of men serving in His Majesty’s Forces is always read, special prayers offered on their behalf and the collection given to the Prince of Wales Fund.

National Egg Collection.

In connection with the above, a small start has been made in Earley Parish, and during the past two weeks nearly 250 eggs have been sent to the central authority. A notification has been received stating that the first 100 were sent direct to the wounded soldiers in our immediate neighbourhood. The total number of donors last week was 25, a noticeable feature being the single eggs received from quite poor people living in Reading, and who keep but a few fowls. The eggs are collected and sent away every Thursday. Anyone who would care to help in this most useful work please communicate with Mr. H. J. Wooldridge, Earley Schools, who has very kindly undertaken the work of receiving and despatching the eggs.

List of Men Serving in His Majesty’s Forces.

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:- Charles Chesterman, Alfread Broad, Frederick Mears, Thomas Mears, Arthur Lailey, Reginald Hawes, Elliot King, Thomas Ilott, Reginald Waite, James Auger, William Barton, William May, Hubert Shorter, Samuel Gould, Charles Phillips Groome, Harry Ching, Frank Aust and Eric Cook.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:-
Killed – Arthur Robb and Ernest Nickes; Wounded – Alfred Broad; Sick – Walter Jerome and Benjamin Bosley (gas poisoning).

Earley St Peter parish magazine, June 1915 (D/P191/28A/22)