Distinguished service in Greece

A Berkshire woman was recognised for her work in Greece.

Miss Marjory Shepherd has been awarded the Greek Decoration Medal of Military Merit, 4th Class, in recognition of distinguished service during the campaign.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, August 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Advertisements

Although their clothes may have been wet, the spirits of both adults and children were apparently in no way dampened

A good time was had by all at the Sulhamstead peace celebrations.

SULHAMSTEAD PEACE CELEBRATIONS

The following full and graphic account of the meetings and celebrations has been received for publication. The whole of it is worth reading and preserving. As it cannot all be printed in this copy, no attempt is made to curtail it, and the remainder will be published later. In addition to the debt which it states the parish owes to certain of its members, there must not be forgotten the admirable executive work conducted by Mr Clay, which enabled the whole to proceed without a single hitch.

A public meeting was held in Sulhamstead Schools on July 8th, when it was decided to hold our Peace Celebrations on the official day, July 19th, and to put a cross on the site of the old Church as a War Memorial. It was very well attended, and we understand it was one of the largest meetings ever held in Sulhamstead.

The following committees were appointed in connection with the Peace Celebrations, with Mr H Clay as Hon. Secretary and Treasurer.

A Catering Committee, under the guidance of Lady Watson, as follows: Mrs Cooper, Nurse Harvie, Miss Hughes, Mrs Price, Mrs Shepherd, Mrs Sheringham, Mrs Steele, Mrs Suhr, Mrs Tyser, Mrs Taylor, Mrs Jos. Wise.

A Sports Committee, under the Chairmanship of Sr W G Watson, bart, as follows: Mr Arlott, Mr A Clarke, Mr Clay, Mr Theo Jones, Mr Leake, Mr Metcalfe, Mr Ralph, Rev. A J P Shepherd, Mr Sheringham, Mr Stokes, Mr Suhr, Mr Norman Watson, Mr Winchcombe.

A Finance Committee, with Sir W G Watson, bart, as Chairman, as follows: Lady Watson, Mrs Sheringham, Miss Hughes, Mr Arlott, Mr Clay, Mr Leake, Rev, A J P Shepherd, Mr Sheringham, Mr Winchcombe.

The various committees appointed carried out their work admirably and amicably, and made the Celebrations on July 19th a great success.

Sir George Watson very kindly threw open his grounds for the occasion.

All the residents of Sulhamstead and Sulhamstead Lower End were invited to the Sports and Tea, and invitation cards were delivered by mebers of the committees to each house. These were collected, and tickets of admittance given out.

Unfortunately the weather was showery, but this did not prevent people being there, and although their clothes may have been wet, the spirits of both adults and children were apparently in no way dampened.

The children’s sports commenced at 2.30 in Sulhamstead Park by a variety of races for those under 14. There were plenty of competitors and the prizes consisted of money given by the committee and special (including two fishing rods, reels, knives, handbag and handkerchiefs) kindly given by Mr and Mrs Sheringham.

[Continued in October issue]

CONTINUATION OF REPORT ON PEACE CELEBRATION

At 4 o’clock tea was provided on the verandah at Sulhamstead House. The Adults’ Tea was served at 5 o’clock, at which meat was provided. The Rev. A J P Shepherd at this stage reminded us of those who had fallen in the war, who had gone from Sulhamstead, and read out the names. During the reading everyone stood in an impressive, solemn silence.

The Sports re-commenced at 6.30 for Adults, in which Pillow-Fighting and Blindfold Boxing caused great amusement. Mr Hayes kindly gave two 10-lb cheeses as special prizes, and money prizes were given by the committee…

The Sports concluded with Tugs of War for Men and Women, which were energetically contested. Each team was cheered by its own supporters. Mr Suhr’s team won the Men’s Tug of War, and Mrs Butler’s tem the Women’s. Mr Leake took charge of the Sports, Mr Norman Watson acting as Starter and Mr Sheringham and Mr Hayward as Judges.

During the afternoon, Bowling for a live pig, which Mr Stokes kindly gave, proved a great attraction. This was won by Mr H G Batts, who succeeded in putting down six skittles with three balls.
We are pleased to say £3.2s.11d. was received from this source as Entrance Fees.

Beer and mineral waters were provided free after 6.30.

Lady Watson presented the prizes to the winners, and vote of thanks was then given to the Catering Committee for their work in providing the tea.

Hearty cheers were given to Sir George and Lady Watson, Mr Norman Watson, and to those who gave the special prizes.

The Celebrations terminated with the National Anthem.

The gathering was a splendid success, and the thanks of everyone are due to the various committees for so ably providing pleasure for all.

Sulhamstead parish magazines, September and October 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Tea for all the inhabitants of the village

Sulhamstead planned to celebrate the war’s end with a party, while remembering the dead forever. Churchgoers were currently worshipping in a brand new building, built only in 1914 next to the previous church.

WAR MEMORIAL AND PEACE CELEBRATIONS

A Public Meeting was summoned by house-to-house circulation of printed notices on Monday, July 7th, with Sir George Watson, bart, as chairman. There was a larger attendance than usual, both of men and women.

A resolution was unanimously carried that a Memorial of those that had fallen should be erected on the site of the old Church. Other suggestions were made to use any balance of money that might be obtained, and these suggestions were deferred for future consideration.

It was decided to attempt to provide tea for all the inhabitants of the village, and to entertain them by means of sports or otherwise.

A Ladies’ Committee was appointed to carry out the catering and a Sports Committee for the entertaining. The Committees had power to co-opt and to act jointly whenever they wished.

The day of celebration was fixed for Saturday, July 19th. Sir George Watson was elected Chairman, Mr Clay Secretary and Treasurer.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, August 1919 (D/EX725/4)

In memory of two sons

The two Sulhamstead parish churches each received a gift in memeory of a fallen soldier.

The Vestry Meetings were held at the Schools on Tuesday, April 22nd. The Rector presided.

Sulhamstead Abbots:

… The Rector stated that Mr G Leake desired to insert a window in the chancel of St Mary’s Church in memory of his son, Lieutenant George Leake (acting captain), DSO, from the design originally made with the corresponding three. The Vestry gave authority for this being erected …

Sulhamstead Bannister:

… The Rector reported that Mrs Tyser was presenting the church with an organ in memory of her son, Major George Beaumont Tyser, East Lancashire Regiment, who was killed in France on July 6th, 1916. He was authorized to obtain a faculty if such were required, and was directed to convey to Mrs Tyser the thanks of the Vestry for her munificent gift.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, July 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Fine views of the War in the Holy Land

Sulhamstead people heard about the First World War in Palestine – and got to see pictures.

April

WAR SAVINGS LECTURES

A Lecture on the war will be given on Thursday, April 3rd, at 7 pm. The subject will be illustrated by lantern pictures on “The War in the Holy Land”.

The Lecture in March was not given, owing to the widespread epidemic of influenza.

May

WAR SAVINGS LECTURE

The last lecture was delivered on April 3rd. There was a good attendance, the subject was “War in the Holy Land”, and some of the views were very fine.

Sulhamstead parish magazines, April and May 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Energetic and continuous work for the Red Cross and St John’s Ambulance during the war

One Sulhamstead woman was central to the parish’s efforts to assist the wounded.

RED CROSS SOCIETY

Mrs Grimshaw has relinquished the tenancy of the Abbots House, to the great regret of all in the parish who knew her and Mrs Greenley. We hope that her five years’ tenancy has sufficiently endeared her to the neighbourhood to bring her repeatedly back on visits.

Mrs Grimshaw’s work for the Red Cross and St John’s Ambulance during the war has been energetic and continuous. Since she was first appointed as Village Representative, her small group of workers were kept steadily employed, and produced a good number of garments. During the last year upwards of 120 garments were dispatched to the Depot. Mrs Sheringham, Mile House, has undertaken the work as the Village Representative.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A shoot against two anti-aircraft pits

An RAF officer with Sulhamstead connections was awarded with a medal.

In the latest list of awards to Officers of the Royal Air Force, the following occurs under the heading of Distinguished Flying Cross:

Captain J H Norton, MC (Egypt)
On all occasions this officer displays gallantry and devotion to duty, notably on July 29th when, in co-operation with our artillery, he carried out a shoot against two anti-aircraft pits. On approaching this target Captain Norton was wounded in the left foot; notwithstanding this, he continued to shoot, and succeeded in destroying both pits, thereby putting out of action two hostile guns.

Captain Norton is the grandson of the late Mrs J Norton, who spent her last years at the Rectory.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

10 miles behind the German lines, with no hope of rescue

A small Sulhamstead church would have an organ as a war memorial.

We are very thankful to hear that our two prisoners of war have returned safe. Sergeant George Steel, MM, has been a prisoner of war since May 1918. It will be remembered that it was at first reported that he had been killed. Private Ernest Adams was made prisoner in March 1918. His company was left 10 miles, or so, behind the German front line after their sudden sweeping advance in that month, and defended themselves there for many hours without any hope of rescue.

Lieutenant Colonel Greenley, DSO, Royal Army Service Corps, whose marriage is reported in this number, has been further distinguished by the conferment by His Majesty of the Companionship of St Michael and St George.

Major Gilbert Shepherd, RE, DSO, Chevalier Croix de Guerre, has been promoted to Brevet-Major.

AN ORGAN FOR ST MICHAEL’S CHURCH

Mrs Tyser has most generously promised to give an organ for St Michael’s Church in memory of Major George B Tyser, East Lancashire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Tyser of Oakfield, who was killed almost instantaneously on July 6th, 1916. He was last seen in the act of encouraging his men across to the enemy trenches in one of the brilliant assaults that we were then making.

Mr J Price, Wilts Regiment, has received his commission as Second Lieutenant, on discharge from the Army. We congratulate him and his family on the well-merited promotion. His brother, Mr Stanley Price, has received a similar promotion. He has been gazetted Second Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force, and is now engaged in instruction work. He, too, receives our best congratulations.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, February 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A home for these men, who had come so far from their kith and kin to fight

Our wounded allies were nursed in Sulhamstead. The house is now the Thames Valley police training centre.

The Convalescent Auxiliary Hospital which was organised and carried on by Lady Watson at Sulhamstead House has now been closed, after rendering splendid service. The hospital was opened in May, 1915, for the reception of 15 convalescent soldiers from Reading Military Hospital, and this number was increased to 22 in July, 1916. Lady Watson’s main object was to receive overseas troops, and as far as military rules allowed, to make a home for these men, who had come so far from their kith and kin to fight. The number of convalescents passed through the hospital was close on 400. The work has been a great pleasure to Lady Watson…

For the last two years Sister Helen Parker has devoted herself unselfishly to the most important duty of caring for the health and happiness of the men in hr charge. A word of thanks is also due to the indoor and outdoor staffs, who were keen to help with the work of the hospital and arrange the men’s amusements, not forgetting Mr Ralph the engineer, who willingly gave up two evenings weekly all through the winter, while the hospital was open, to give the men cinema entertainments.

(From “The Reading Mercury”.)

Sulhamstead parish magazine, February 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Interesting lectures to stimulate the “War Saving” campaign

A series of illustrated lectures showed people at home something of what the war had been like.

February

An interesting lecture on the war, accompanied with lantern views, was given at the Schools on Thursday, January 9th. The object of the lecture was to stimulate the “War Saving” campaign in the neighbourhood. The lecture was well worth attending, but it appears that there were many who did not know that it was to be given.

A second lecture is fixed for February 6th. The subject will be illustrated by lantern pictures on the war in Italy.

A Thanksgiving week is to be held from February 17th to 22nd, and it is hoped that as large an investment as possible will be made in War Savings Certificates during that week. On Tuesday, February 18th, a Gun will travel over Burghfield Common and Sulhamstead during the morning, and War Savings Certificates will be sold during the stay of the Gun in the parish.

March

PEACE AND THANKSGIVING CAMPAIGN

The second Lecture was given in the School on February 6th. The Lecture was not as announced, on “Italy”, but on the “War at Sea”. The views exhibited were very fine, and the attendance was good.
The next Lecture will be on “War in Italy”, and will be given, accompanied by Lantern Views, in the Ufton Schoolroom, on March 6th.

Sulhamstead parish magazines, February-March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Lieutenant East lost his leg in the service of the Country and Empire

Men were starting to return from imprisonment.

COMMISSION IN THE AUSTRALIAN IMPERIAL FORCE

Mr and Mrs East, of Church Cottage, have received notification from General W Birdwood, CO, Australian Force, that their son, Mr Robert East, has been appointed Second Lieutenant from August 10th, 1917. The notification is dated 6/3/1918. It will be remembered that Lieutenant East lost his leg in the service of the Country and Empire.

RETURN OF PRISONERS OF WAR

The first prisoner of war to return to the parish has been Private Roland Pitherall, who returned at the beginning of November.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, January 1919 (D/EX725/4)

It is hoped that the attendances at the Intercession Services will be as large and the progress as real as during the last four anxious years

The war might be over, but there was still plenty to pray for.

JANUARY 5TH, 1919

For four years the first Sunday in the year has been observed as a Day of Intercession for our cause in the Great War. This year the Archbishops have requested the Church to observe the day as one of Prayer for the Nation and our Allies, and to devote the offertories at all services to the Red Cross Society and the Order of St John of Jerusalem. It is hoped that the attendances at the Intercession Services will be as large and the progress as real as during the last four anxious years.

11.0 a.m St Mary’s Church, Morning Service.
11.45 a.m. St Mary’s Church, Holy Communion.
3.30 p.m. St Michael’s Church, Evening Service.
6.0 p.m. Rector’s Room, Evening Service.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, January 1919 (D/EX725/4)

The great gift of Peace

How would the country change now that it was at peace again?

January 1st, 1919.

My Parishioners and Friends,

Four successive years have found us in the midst of the heavy stress of war with its grievous anxieties and sorrows. A New Year opens with this war closed and our hearts full of thankfulness to the God Who has righted wrong and saved the world from its deadly peril.

November 17th found our churches filled with devout worshippers, and our Thanksgiving Service with its glorious “Te Deum” moved us, perhaps, as we have never been moved before. Even our great days of Intercession during the war scarcely seemed to bring the power and providence of God so near.

Shall not the close of the war make a fresh beginning in our relations with God. The beautiful “General Thanksgiving” in our Prayer Book teaches us to say:

“We beseech Thee, give us that due sense of all Thy mercies… that we shew forth Thy praise, not only with our lips, but in our lives.”

We often try to adjust our lives towards one another. The whole of England is trying to do it now in what we call “Social Reconstruction”. This great gift of Peace calls us to adjust our lives towards God….

May God make the year one of peace and happiness to us all, our Nation and Empire.

Your affectionate Rector,
Alfred J P Shepherd.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, January 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Suddenly the end of the long drawn tragedy has come – so use your vote unselfishly

Sulhamstead advised new voters – women and less wealthy men – to use their new votes wisely.

We thank God that this paragraph is no longer headed “The War”. Suddenly the end of the long drawn tragedy has come, and the whole kingdom and Empire has united in thanksgiving. May God grant that the lessons learnt during the War may be fruitful in the “Reconstruction” of our country and in the increased happiness of the lives of all.

Within a few days of the receipt of this issue of the magazine, an election will be held through the country. For the first time women will vote in a Parliamentary Election. The vote is a serious responsibility. We must all aim at so giving our votes that they may not be used selfishly, but for the good of the whole community.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, December 1918 (D/EX725/4)

“It is not often that all the anxieties connected with one parish have been so happily relieved”

Having a loved one reported missing was a cause for great anxiety.

THE WAR

Gunner W C Giles, RFA, and Private Rowland Pitheral, 2nd Royal Berks, who were both reported missing since May 27th, are now reported as prisoners of war. Private Ernest Adams, also missing for some time, is now reported prisoner of war. We are thankful that the fears of their relations have been removed in this way. It is not often that all the anxieties connected with one parish have been so happily relieved.

Captain Gerald Merton, RAF, was gazetted Major on July 30th. He has also been mentioned in despatches for work in Mesopotamia. This is the second time he has been so named.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, October 1918 (D/EX725/4)