Fine views of the War in the Holy Land

Sulhamstead people heard about the First World War in Palestine – and got to see pictures.

April

WAR SAVINGS LECTURES

A Lecture on the war will be given on Thursday, April 3rd, at 7 pm. The subject will be illustrated by lantern pictures on “The War in the Holy Land”.

The Lecture in March was not given, owing to the widespread epidemic of influenza.

May

WAR SAVINGS LECTURE

The last lecture was delivered on April 3rd. There was a good attendance, the subject was “War in the Holy Land”, and some of the views were very fine.

Sulhamstead parish magazines, April and May 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Advertisements

The work of the Navy in the Great War

Newbury children attended a lecture on the Navy.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School
19th February 1919

A party of boys was taken, at the suggestion of the Education Committee, to a lecture at the Picture Palace on ‘The work of the Navy in the Great War’.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School
28th February 1919

On the afternoon of Feb. 19th the upper classes attended an illustrated lecture on ‘The Navy’, at the Picture Palace.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School log book (90/SCH/5/3, p. 48); Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School log look(90/SCH/5/5, p. 244)

A Lecture at the Picture Palace on the Navy

em>You may remember that Mrs Thornton had been absent since the 12th, due to the return home of her soldier husband. This was causing difficulties for her colleagues.

Sunninghill
18th February 1919

Mrs Thornton is still absent, & as a consequence 4 teachers are managing 5 rooms, & each teacher has charge of 2 classes – an instance of overwork of which we have had much undesirable experience of this school.

Speenhamland
Feb 18th

About 120 children of the Upper Standard attend a Lecture at the Picture Palace on the Navy; they will be required to write an Essay on what they see and hear and prizes will be given for the best.

Receipt for £1.1.0 received from the Organiser of the King’s Fund for the Disabled.

Ascot
February 18th 1919

Through lack of coal great difficulty is being experienced in keeping the rooms warm enough for the boys to work in any degree of comfort.


Log books of St Michael’s CE Mixed School, Sunninghill (88/SCH/32/3); St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Ascot Heath Boys’ School (C/EL110/4

Money will no longer be needed for carrying on the war, but it is needed as much as ever for winding it up

The war might be over, but it still had to be paid for.

“War Savings”

Although we may hope that money will no longer be needed for carrying on the war, we are assured that it is needed as much as ever for winding it up. And the “Guns Week” will take place just the same, under the happier name of “Thanksgiving Week”. A gun has been promised to be lent for the week 17th to 24th February, during which time it will visit the principal centres in the District of their Local Committee, so that country folk may see a specimen of the weapon that has helped to give us victory. Meanwhile, we are also promised the loan of some excellent lantern slides, illustrating various features of the war, with explanatory lectures. Notices will be given in the usual way.

Burghfield parish magazine, December 1918 (D/EX725/4)

Interesting lectures to stimulate the “War Saving” campaign

A series of illustrated lectures showed people at home something of what the war had been like.

February

An interesting lecture on the war, accompanied with lantern views, was given at the Schools on Thursday, January 9th. The object of the lecture was to stimulate the “War Saving” campaign in the neighbourhood. The lecture was well worth attending, but it appears that there were many who did not know that it was to be given.

A second lecture is fixed for February 6th. The subject will be illustrated by lantern pictures on the war in Italy.

A Thanksgiving week is to be held from February 17th to 22nd, and it is hoped that as large an investment as possible will be made in War Savings Certificates during that week. On Tuesday, February 18th, a Gun will travel over Burghfield Common and Sulhamstead during the morning, and War Savings Certificates will be sold during the stay of the Gun in the parish.

March

PEACE AND THANKSGIVING CAMPAIGN

The second Lecture was given in the School on February 6th. The Lecture was not as announced, on “Italy”, but on the “War at Sea”. The views exhibited were very fine, and the attendance was good.
The next Lecture will be on “War in Italy”, and will be given, accompanied by Lantern Views, in the Ufton Schoolroom, on March 6th.

Sulhamstead parish magazines, February-March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Influenza forbids

Money still needed to be raised for meeting the costs of the war.

War Savings

On 5th February there was another Lantern Lecture, “The War on Land”, this time at the Jubilee Room. The Rector, Mr Anderson, and Mr Lousley, all spoke on the importance of saving. There was to have been another Lecture, this week, but influenza forbids.

Burghfield parish magazine, March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A thrilling escape

Philip Godsal, sone of a Welsh landowner, was captured early in the war, and eventually made a daring escape in 1917.

5 February 1919

Monthly Meeting

A most interesting lecture was given by Capt Philp Godsal on his experiences as a prisoner of war in various camps in Germany, and his thrilling escape to Holland.

Hurst WI minutes (D/EX1925/33/1/1)

Due to the general prevalence of illness throughout the county, people in many districts have been averse to congregating together

Applications for roadside war memorials were starting to come before Berkshire County Council.

Report of the Highways and Bridges Committee, 11 January 1919

WAR MEMORIALS

An application has been received from the Bath Road Club for sanction to erect a war memorial, in the form of a signpost, near Aldermaston lane on the Bath road.

The Committee do not recommend that consent be given.

A similar application from Cookham for permission to erect a memorial in the form of an Iona Cross is under consideration.


Report of Agricultural Instruction Committee to Education Committee, 11 January 1919

…The Committee present the following report of the Agricultural Organiser, received from the Principal and Acting Dean of University College, Reading, viz…

It should be pointed out that [during the quarter ending 31 December 1918] the work has been disorganized by the general prevalence of illness throughout the county. People in many districts have been averse to congregating together, with the result that in some places it was impossible to get audiences, whilst in others it was found necessary to postpone, or cancel, lectures which had been arranged. Moreover most, if not all members engaged on county work, have suffered illness during the quarter.

G S Bedford
Agricultural Organiser…

TRAINING OF DISCHARGED OFFICERS

The Committee have been asked to carry out a scheme for the training in agriculture of discharged officers; and a special Sub-committee has been appointed, consisting of representatives of this Committee, the Agricultural Executive Committee and the War Pensions Committee (in consultation with the Local Director of the Ministry of Labour). Under the scheme selected officers will receive an allowance of £125 per annum for 2 years, and additional allowances will be made to married officers, with children, up to £90. The administration of the scheme, and the amount of award, have been entrusted to this committee….

TRAINING OF MILKERS

Out of 29 applications, fifteen certificates have been awarded to women who (without State assistance) had been milking since the commencement of the war, and previous to 1918. Letters of appreciation have been sent to the applicants whose work was satisfactory, but whose length of service did not entitle them to certificates….

BCC minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

War echoes

The war was over but not forgotten.

WAR ECHOES

Honours and Promotions

Temporary Captain G H B Chance (MGC) to be Temporary Major (November). Harry D West (RGA) is Farrier Sergeant Major (date unknown).

Casualty

Private William West (MGC), died in France (of broncho-pneumonia).

Repatriation

Private F J Painter (5th Royal Berks)

Christmas Parcels

In view of the difficulties both of obtaining things to send, and of ascertaining correct addresses, and also in consideration of the fact that hostilities are suspended, Mr Willink has made no arrangements for sending parcels this season to sailors and soldiers. They may be sure, however, that they are not forgotten by all at home.

The Influenza

This epidemic, which has amounted to a veritable plague, seems to be abating in this country. We are told that throughout the world it has directly, or by after-effects, caused over 6 million deaths, more than the number reported from action of this war of 4 ½ years.

WAR SAVINGS

Peace and Thanksgiving Campaign

The war may be practically over, but money is still urgently required for a time. The National War Savings Committee have been called on by the Government to make one more big effort during the period ending with next autumn. Berkshire’s share is assessed at £900,000, of which our Bradfield Local Committee are asked to raise £50,000. with this object, Lantern Lectures, with excellent slides, will be given in each Association’s area from January to April. The present arrangements for Burghfield are:

January 8th War on Land
February 5th War in Italy
March 5th War at Sea
April 2nd War in the Holy Land

The first and third will be at the Handicraft Room, Mrs Bland’s School; the second and fourth in the Jubilee Room or the C of E School, 7 o’clock in all cases.

The Committee hope that readers of the magazine will make these facts known, and do their best to see that the campaign is a success.

A Burghfield War Memorial

It is, perhaps, too soon to begin public consultation of this matter. But it is not too soon to begin thinking about it. Probably we are all agreed that there should be some visible memorial of this Great War to keep alive the recollection of the working part playing in it by Burghfield men.

Burghfield parish magazine, January 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A red letter day

Aston Tirrold
20th December 1918

In commemoration of the signing of the armistice, a lady in the village, Mrs Moon, gave the school children a tea followed by a conjuring entertainment. Needless to say it was a red-letter day in our little community. Later on in the evening (7.30) under the auspices of the local War Savings associations, a Lantern lecture was given by Dr Smith.

Speenhamland
Dec 20

Visit of Edward Tuck of the Royal Navy.

Ascot Heath
December 20th 1918

School closed (a.m.) for the Xmas Holidays. An Entertainment was given to the Children this afternoon by the Managers to mark in some way the end of actual Hostilities.

Log books of Aston Tirrold CE School (C/EL105/1); St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Ascot Heath Boys’ School (C/EL110/4)

“We hope this most important work of re-construction will appeal to those who have till now given their time up to war work”

Women were invited to join in the work rebuilding the country after the war.

Hare Hatch Women’s Institute

The Women’s Institute was started in August, 1918 and Mrs. Noble agreed to be Hon. Secretary for three months. Twenty-three members have been enrolled, the meetings have been well attended and the members seem to appreciate the advantages offered to them. Lectures have been given by London speakers on Food Production, Children’s Welfare and Fuel Saving. We are asked now to make the land girls living in our midst Honorary Member of the Institute. The Hospitals and Depots will shortly be closed. We hope this most important work of re-construction will appeal to those who have till now given their time up to war work.

More Members are wanted. Will anyone volunteer now, or after their present work is over, and enrol their names as Pioneers in the Re-construction of Village Life.

Will anyone willing to help, kindly send her name to Mrs. Winter, The Vicarage, or to Mrs. Wilson Noble, Hon. Sec., Kingswood, Hare Hatch.

M.C.N.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

We have now finished blackberry picking

The terrible flu epidemic hit Hurst.

Hurst
25th October 1918

Some of the boys in the lower class are away with influenza. School closed for a fortnight owing to influenza.

Hampstead Norreys
25th Oct.

We have now finished blackberry picking & altogether this school has picked 2001 lbs. With Filsham (177 ½ lbs) and Yattendon (163 ½ lbs) we have sent away 2,342 lbs.

On “Our Day”, 24th Oct., we collected £6 7s 0 ½ d for the Red Cross Funds.

Reading
1918
Oct 25

School closed till the 5th Nov. because of the prevalence of Influenza. Three teachers – Miss Tilley, Miss Godwin, and Mrs Page, away through influenza.

25th October 1918
A Lantern lecture was given in the schoolroom this evening by Dr Smith – the proceeds going to the Red Cross Fund.


Log books of Hurst C of E Boys School log book (D/P73/28/23, p. 39); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); St John’s School, Reading (D/P172/28A/23); Aston Tirrold CE School log book (C/EL105/1, p. 168)

The NCOs do not seem to know a great deal about bombs

Sydney was battling through his digestive issues – not to mention his self confidence.


Monday 22 July 1918

As I had had a hard day yesterday, what with the reconnaissance & my indisposition, I did not attend the first parade but went to aid post & there obtained some castor oil for inspection uses.

Went on 9.45 parade. Did platoon training which included some interesting fire orders work. After lunch rested & censored letters.

At 5.15 gave a lecture to all NCOs on bombs, chiefly about the mills bomb. The NCOs do not seem to know a great deal about bombs. I hope I didn’t bore them stiff. After the lecture there were no other parades.

Spent remainder of day in writing, playing patience etc. To bed fairly early. Feeling better after castor oil!

Diary of Sydney Spencer (D/EZ177/8/15)

“Rather boring but a necessary part of a course I suppose”

Sydney Spencer continued his gas course.

Sunday 9 June 1918

Got up at 7.15. After breakfast wrote up some of my notes. On parade. A long lecture on yellow cross shelling. A very good lecture. After a break, we each had to give details for different drills. Rather boring but a necessary part of a course I suppose. Then a talk by SSOI training Lt Col Porrit Morris. A lecture on cause of casualties in yellow cross. Then we dismissed.

After lunch, during which we had a few contretemps owing to bad mess waiting, a lecture on gas poisoning. After tea lolled about a bit. Wrote notes until 7 pm & then down to Hesdin to dinner with Barker. Noticed a French Major at dinner. He was a curious old man & had curious manners.

After dinner walked back to mess & wrote up my notes until 12.30. Then to bed and read more of Tartarin de Tarascon. A highly entertaining book. A lot of ‘sweet’ rain today to cool the atmosphere. A fine night.

Diary of Sydney Spencer (D/EZ177/8/15)

A very vigorous lecture on the Navy’s work in the War

Grammar schoolboys in Newbury heard about the Navy – with an eye to recruiting them, perhaps?

On Tuesday, May 21st, we were treated to a very vigorous lecture on the Navy’s work in the War, by Mr. White, a chief lecturer of the Admiralty, who has been doing a tour of the Public Schools. Incidentally it was remarked how few boys we send into the Navy from the school.

The Newburian (magazine of St Bartholomew’s School, Newbury), July 1918 (N/D161/1/8)