Girls need lodgings in towns while doing war work

Young women who had joined the workforce under war conditions needed somewhere safe to live.

In these days when girls need lodgings in towns while doing war work of various kinds it is well to bring before them the advantages offered by the “Girls’ Friendly Society” Lodges in the Diocese.
With the Lady Superintendents always at hand in case of little ailments or worries and other girls for company, a “Lodge” is more cheerful than solitary lodgings. Food too, can be better and more varied with a large number to cater for.

The Diocesan Lodges have charming gardens.

Those who do not belong to the Society need a reference and a charged a little more than members of the G.F.S.

The necessity for special training in various trades and professions, is well understood: it is now becoming recognised that this is also needed for domestic service. Girls can obtain this training at the Lodges.

Terms can be had by sending a stamped envelope to the Lady Superintendents :- G.F.S. Lodge, 63, St. Giles, Oxford; Berks G.F.S. Lodge, 62, London Street, Reading; Alma Cottage, Speen, Newbury.

Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

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‘He has now volunteered for Field Ambulance work at Salonika’

Will Spencer had news of several of his brothers. Stanley and Gilbert, both art students and a year apart in age, were very close to one another, and both had joined the Royal Army Medical Corps.

31 August 1916

Letters from Mother & from Florrie. Both contained the news that Gilbert had recently written from a hospital ship at Marseilles. He has now volunteered for Field Ambulance work at Salonika. Stanley hopes he may be going to Salonika, as he so much wants to be with Gilbert. Horace better, & making himself useful by making tables & chairs.

Diary of Will Spencer in Switzerland (D/EX801/26)

A Belgian refugee in Maidenhead finds work

The financial burden of supporting Belgian refugees lessened when they were able to find work.

OUR BELGIAN REFUGEES.
As Mr. Van Hoof is now earning regular wages, the Committee has decided to be responsible in future for rent and gas only.

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, August 1916 (D/N33/12/1/5)

The daily harvest of the best and most promising

John Maxwell Image wrote to his friend W F Smith with his latest thoughts on the tragedy of the war and his Trinity colleague, Bertrand Russell, the famous philosopher who was preaching pacifism.

29 Barton Road
[Cambridge]
Wednesday 30 Aug. ‘16

My very dear old man

Monday I was at War Work!…

[Today] the Signora is away in Cats working swabs for the wounded…

Our whole young manhood is forced to the Front, and it is the best and the most promising of their lives that the by no means “blind” Fury slits. It sickens me to read her choices, and to know that the daily harvest goes on and on and on.

Bertrand Russell has taken his name off the Trinity boards, and sold by auction the furniture of his rooms – but he is refused permission to cross to USA and preach mischief there – as I hear did Norman Angell at an earlier period….

Letter from John Maxwell Image to W F Smith (D/EX801/2)

Romania declares war

A new ally joined the war. Romania’s objective was to acquire Transylvania, a region within the Austro-Hungarian Empire with a high Romanian population.

29 August 1916
Roumania has declared war on Austria, & Germany on Roumania next day.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

Reported wounded and missing long ago in Gallipoli

Children and adults in Bracknell contributed what they could to the war.

EGGS FOR THE WOUNDED.

During the last seven months from January, 1916, 1,106 eggs have been sent to Reading for the National Egg collection.

I should like to take this opportunity to thank on behalf of the Soldiers all those who have sent eggs, and also Mr. Barnard, who has most kindly conveyed them to Reading free of charge. I hope that everyone will continue to send as many eggs as possible each week either direct to the Vicarage or to Mr. May, High Street.

A.M. BARNETT.

WAR WORK.

Names of some of the Bracknell Children who have lately sent knitting to the War Work Depot:- Ethel Brant, Alice Cheney, Phoebe White, Amelia Quick, Phyllis Gough, Dorothy Gale, Mary Wera, May Rance, Grace Fowler, Evelyn Townshend, Margery Metson, Ethel Morley, D. Townshend.

We regret the news has now come through that Jack Franks, who was reported wounded and missing long ago in Gallipoli, is dead. He was one of our choir boys, and though it is now some years since the family left Bracknell, many of us remember him very well, and much sympathy is felt for his mother.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

Italy declares war on Germany

Our diarists Florence Vansittart Neale and William Hallam were busy in different ways. Italy had been at war with Austria for a year, but now formally added Germany to her enemies.

Florence Vansittart Neale
28 Aug 1916

Most lovely. Submarines about….

Went to Folkestone… Invited soldiers for Wed.

Italy declared war on Germany.

William Hallam
28th August 1916

Fine day. Gun work came in to-day so working overtime till ½ past 7.

Diaries of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8);
and William Hallam (D/EX1415/24)

“Rendered unconscious for 48 hours by the bursting of a trench mortar within a yard of him, and suffering from nervous shock”

Winkfield men continued to suffer.

PARISH NOTES

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.-

We deeply regret to have to record that to our list of those who have laid down their lives for their country must now be added Gunner Joseph Church, who was killed in action at the end of July. Our hearts go in sympathy to his bereaved parents and relatives, and a Memorial Service was held for him on the evening of Sunday, August 27th.

Yet more of our men have been wounded, but we are thankful to know that the wounds are comparatively slight and all are well.

Pte. Ernest Faithful has been wounded in the knee.

Pte. George Benstead has a shell wound in the knee, and is in hospital in France.

Pte. Walter Reed was rendered unconscious for 48 hours by the bursting of a trench mortar within a yard of him, and is suffering from nervous shock, but he is now out of hospital on short leave home, and we trust that time and rest will soon set him up again.

Pte. Albert Fletcher has joined 9th Royal Berks Regt., and Pte. Frank Simmonds the Durham Light Infantry.

Our prayers are asked for Pte. Charles Edward Burt, who left his wife and children in Canada to come over and do his bit for the old country, and is now at the front, and also for his brother William Burt, who went out to France last month and is now in the trenches.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/9)

Howitzer training for Sydney Spencer

Sydney Spencer was sent on howitzer gun training.

1916
Aug 27

By order 1378. Howitzer course. Capt Loughton will not attend this course. Lieut Spencer will attend in his place.


Diary of Sydney Spencer of Cookham (D/EX801/12)

“Bits for the war”

Ascot people were active supporting some of our Allies undergoing the hardships of war.

ASCOT “LEAGUE OF PRAYER” (during the war.)

We very earnestly invite our people generally to join this League, and thus help bring down special blessing from GOD upon the Parish. Hitherto, except on Sundays, very few have been accustomed to enter GOD’S House at all. Some never enter it even on Sundays. HIS Sanctuary has been “put in coventry” during the week. Shall we, as one fruit of the National Mission,” change all this?

The Rule of the League is extremely simple, and is as follows.-
“I promise to go into the Church at least once a week between the hours of 7.30 a.m. and 7.30 p.m., and to spend at least 10 minutes in prayer or silent meditation before GOD.”

SERBIAN FLAG DAY.

Our readers, (so many of whom contributed, by their help and generosity towards the great success of the Serbian Flag Day on July 1st) will be delighted to hear that £150 was realized, after paying expenses. Of this the sum of £100 has been given to the Serbian Relief Fund and £50 to the continued upkeep of the “Ascot” Bed in the Hospital belonging to the Serbian Unit of the Scottish Women’s Hospital.

A remarkable feature of this day (due to the liberality and energy of the organisers) is the fact that expenses amounted to only a few shillings over £2. Kosobo [sic] Day, June 28th (the Serbian National Day), was kept in our Parish by special instructions in Serbia in our schools. On Sunday, July 2nd (Serbian Sunday), our gallant and suffering Allies were specially remembered at God’s Altar, and at all the other services, with addresses at Matins and at the Catechism Service. The Serbian National Anthem was sung at the conclusion of Matins and Evensong.

A COLLECTING BOX in aid of the Ascot Military Hospital is kept at the “Foresters’ Arms” Hotel by the kindness of Mr. Pendell. This was opened for the first time a short time ago, and its contents – £1 1s. 3½d. – forwarded to the institution named.

THE BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ SALE, in aid of the starving Belgian children (in Belgium itself) came off at the Ascot Schools on Saturday afternoon, July 22nd, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

It was an enormous success, and is of exceptional value as bearing witness to the unselfish and very hard work of the boys and girls of our Schools, led by their teachers, and representing the most ambitious among many “bits for the war” that represent our “children’s war offerings” since the war itself began.

We will give a list of some of these “bits” in the September Magazine, as also a full account of the sale. For the present, it must suffice to state that the approximate profits of the sale amount to over £40, represented as follows:

Boys’ department … £13 0 0
Girls’ “ … 16 10 0
Infants’ “ … 11 7 0

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

A present to the interned Germans

The Spencers found out more about the interned Germans in Switzerland. They had also been in contact with Johanna’s brother in the USA.

26 August 1916

J[ohanna] read that the recent steamer-trip of the soldiers (of Aug. 23) & two others, one of which yesterday – we saw the steamer in Lucerne – were a present to the interned German soldiers from Freiherr v. Brunig (of the Hochst Farbwerke) – 600 were taken each trip. Johanna this afternoon forwarded Robert’s letter to Bonn (as he desired). It contained the news that Erich had gone to Texas with the Militia.


Diary of Will Spencer in Switzerland (D/EX801/26)

Another air raid

Another air raid hit the country.

25 Aug 1916
Air raid on S. E. coast & London.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

Saying goodbye to a beloved son

Will Spencer kept in touch with his Cookham family, and had news of two of his serving brothers.

24 August 1916

Letter from Father… Had been to Aldershot to say ‘goodbye’ to ‘dear old Stan’, who had been home while Father was away, ‘& expects to be leaving England in two or three days’. Horace has had an attack of malarial fever, & is still in hospital.

Diary of Will Spencer in Switzerland (D/EX801/26)

Surprised by a tramp of soldiers

Foreign soldiers from both sides were interned in neutral Switzerland, mainly prisoners of war transferred to receive medical treatment. British expat Will Spencer and his German wife Johanna, holidaying on Lake Lucerne, were interested to see them.

23 August 1916

Shortly after dinner we were surprised by a tramp of soldiers, & saw soldiers & civilians interned from Alpnachstad & “our” interned soldiers assemble by the waterside in hotel garden, & afterwards embark on a large steamer (with music & many other soldiers on board) which came from Lucerne. I fetched the camera just in time for J[ohanna] to take a couple of snapshots of the steamer as it moved away.

Diary of Will Spencer in Switzerland (D/EX801/26)

Experiencing the true horrors of war

Winkfield men were facing the horrors of war as the Battle of the Somme raged on.

PARISH NOTES

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Lieut. R. Hayes-Sadler having recovered from his wound has now returned to the Front. Pte. Walter Reed and Pte. Fred Thurmer have also just left for France. We trust that they and all our men who are now experiencing the true horrors of war will have the support of our very earnest prayers at this critical time.

Six of our men were wounded in the recent big advance in France.
2nd Lieut. George Ferard had a very narrow escape from death, he was hit in three places, the result of a shell bursting at his feet, killing several of his men and blowing him away five yards. He has made a wonderfully quick recovery and were rejoiced to see him in Church on July 16th, but of course it must be some time before he is fully recovered.

Pte. James Winnen was wounded in two places, but is now doing well in hospital in England. In a letter to the Vicar he writes:

“The wounds in my leg have healed up again, but when it was put under X rays it was discovered that there was a piece of shrapnel in the centre of the bone, which is impossible to get out. My arm is getting well, in fact the doctor said he had never see a wound heel up so soon considering it was a shrapnel wound. I think I was very lucky to escape with such slight wounds. I shall most certainly come and see you when I get home. I know it will interest you to hear about my experiences in the German lines [he received first aid from a German doctor] I can’t quite realize yet that I am in England, in fact, I still fancy I can hear the guns roaring.”

Pte. Reginald Knight was also wounded in two places, but is recovering rapidly in hospital and is already up and about the wards.

Lance-Corporal Harry Rixon has been wounded for the second time during this war and so has earned two of the new gold stripes. He and his brother, Sergt. William Rixon, we are glad to hear, are going on well.

Pte. Edward Holloway has been wounded slightly and is doing well at a base hospital in France.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)