One of the chief peace victories is to be gained by thrift

War Savings Association

Victory Week was a momentous one in the Association as the sum of £21 12s 4d subscribed brought the total subscriptions since November, 1916, to £1,009 19s 5d. This almost doubles the total quoted last December and is a sign that some at least realise that one of the chief peace victories is to be gained by thrift. Miss Johnston has kindly undertaken to carry on the work of secretary as the Association merges into the peace scheme for national savings.

Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1919 (D/EX1675/6/2/2)

Advertisements

“We have seen the women’s movement culminate in the claim for priesthood”

It would be a long time before the Church of England agreed to admit women to the priesthood, but here we see the changes of WWI first brought the movement to life.

My dear friends.

One of the immediate Ecclesiastical outcomes of the war is a demand on the part of the chaplains for reunion on practically any terms. That reunion is the crying need of Christendom is apparent to most people, but it must be only on a sure and lasting basis. It is understood that proposals will be laid before the Bishops in Convocation asking them to consent (1) to the interchange of pulpits with non-conformist preachers (2) to admit women to a larger share of teaching work within consecrated buildings. The first of these proposals would be to disguise the evil of division without removing it…

On the question of women preachers the Church Universal must speak before any part of the Church dare introduce new practices. We have seen the women’s movement culminate in the claim for priesthood. This shocks most people and should warn our Bishops how carefully they should walk. I earnestly hope that our communicants will not be apathetic about writing their protest.

South Ascot Parochial magazine, July 1919 (D/P186/28A/19)

Charging the rates

Wages were reviewed in the light of new conditions.

1st July 1919

Your Committee have considered the reference to them of the Local Government Board’s circular letter as to the Treasury’s revised scale of War Bonuses for Civil Servants which they have authorised for Officers’ salaries generally.

They are unable to recommend that the revised scale of bonuses be adopted in its entirety for all officers of the Board generally.

They recommend that the Deputy Clerk’s Bonus be increased by the sum of £5 per annum as regards the Board of Guardians.

Your Committee have considered the salaries of the Indoor Officers and recommend as follows:

That, subject to sanction of the Local Government Board, the salaries of the Master and Matron be increased by the sum of £20 each with War Bonuses as at present.

That the salary of the Head Nurse be increased from £45 per annum to £50 and a further increase of £5 from 1st April, 1920, the War Bonus to be on the existing scale.

That the salaries of the Assistant Nurses be increased as follows:

Nurse Webb, from £30 to £35,
Nurse Leache, from £25 to £27,

The War Bonuses to remain at the existing amounts.

That the salaries of the Cook be increased from £30 to £36 per annum, the Industrial Trainer from £25 to £27 per annum, the Workhouse Porter from 35/- to 27/6 per week, the temporary Assistant Matron from 7/6- to 10/- per week, the War Bonuses to remain at the existing amounts.

All the foregoing increases to take effect as from the 1st April, 1919…

Your Committee have also considered the application of Dr Joy for a superannuation allowance in respect of his services and for the addition of a number of years to the number of years he has actually served.

As regards the latter proposal, your Committee regret that they are unable to recommend the Board to charge the rates with the extra expenditure which would be incurred by such addition of years.

Bradfield Board of Guardians: Finance Committee report (G/B1/39)

The final downfall of German militarism: the most epoch-making moment of the year nineteen hundred and nineteen

A woman who grew up in Windsor was present at the celebrations after the signing of the treaty which brought a formal end to the war.

The Peace of Versailles

Probably the most epoch-making moment of the year nineteen hundred and nineteen was that marked by Hermann Muller signing the Treaty of Peace in the name of the German Republic. We did not see that signature affixed. We reached the palace of Versailles as the first gun fired its signal to the waiting crowds. In fact, we were late, for motor cars had been sorely taxed, and we had come with a relay. But the rush in this car from the Arc-de-Triomphe in Paris to Versailles was full of vivid impressions.

Our route lay through the woods of Boulogne-sur-Seine and St Cloud, then in the full flush of their summer glory and lit by a warm sun. The road all the way was kept by French soldiers posted every hundred yards, and at every bend, and as our car dashed furiously along the clear road, people looked at us so curiously, that we felt we must be taken for late arrivals, who hoped at least to defer and perhaps to annul the Treaty.

At last we swung into the long straight avenue leading up to the Palace gates. On either side, dense lines of cavalry – chestnut mounts, azure blue uniforms and helmets overtopped with gleaming lances and red and white pennons, al in perfect alignment. As our late car approached, the whole formation, till then “at ease”, sprang to attention, and we felt we were very fraudulent, and quite undeserving of such salutes. We got out quickly, and as we reached the terrace beyond the Palace, the first gun told us that peace had been signed. The followed a great scene in a great setting: the long park front of the Bourbon’s home, the wide formal gardens of the terrace, the great fountains which play so seldom, and all of these were bathed in sunshine. The Republican Guard were much in evidence, the infantry in dark blue, with befeathered kepis, while the sun was reflected from the dazzling rows of the cuirassiers.

Whilst the German delegates were departing there was silence, but when the “Big Four” appeared, the assembled company on the terrace could restrain itself no longer, and their reception was immense, while the leading representatives of France and England, on making their way to the far edge of the terrace, were well-night carried off their feet by the crowd. The view which these leaders of the Congress had when they eventually reached their goal was unique – in the foreground, the steep slope of the formal gardens, then the high boundary rail, behind it and with the superb avenue and lake for background, the Parisian in his thousands, and with his wife and family all densely packed and cheering.

This was the picture which we left by a side entrance, to seek contrast in the solitude of the great park of Versailles, and there, buried in silent glades, or roaming amidst the artificial rusticity of the “hamlet” it was easy to see again as in a Watteau picture, the senseless but harmless frolics of the Court of Louis XV. Here we were free to muse upon the epochs of history which have had their opening and closing scenes in these surroundings. The revolutionary oath taken in the Tennis Court beyond the palace spelt doom to the regime of artificial shepherds and shepherdesses and all that they implied; from this a span of eighty-two years saw, in the Palais de Glace, the triumph of German militarism, and this day June 28th, 1919, after a further lapse of forty-eight years, had seen its downfall.

An Old Girl.


Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1920 (D/EX1675/6/2/2)

A devoted band of workers who came month after month so regularly to work for the wounded

Earley women’s work during the war was successful.

War Work

Mrs Norris wishes to thank all her devoted band of workers who came month after month so regularly to work for the wounded. Altogether 1,182 garments were sent in – everything well made, and appreciated at the Depot. We are thankful to have been able to help in this way.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

“Everyone seems to be doing war work but myself”

Old Girls and teachers of St Stephen’s High School in Clewer had done war work of various kinds.

News of Old Girls

E. Truman is abroad, Army nursing.

St Stephen’s High School Building Fund

For some time the need of new premises for the High School has been urgent, and now that the war is over it is proposed to carry out the plans…

It is felt that the Old Girls and former members of staff would like to contribute a substantial sum towards the Building Fund in commemoration of the Declaration of Peace, and we, the undersigned, urge upon all the necessity of making a special effort to support it as liberally as possible.

Extract from letter from Mrs Salmon

Miss Gedge has stopped writing. Do you know anything of her? She was doing war work when last I heard. Everyone seems to be doing that but myself. I had the chance of doing a little last year in Zemba, and was glad of it. I was elected Chairwoman of “Our Day” Fund, and in six months we collected over £3,700, which we were quite proud of, as, apart from the troops, there are under 600 whites in Nyasaland! We got up dances, concerts, a play, etc, and ended with a Fancy fair, at which latter we made £1,200. It was a great success. We held it in the Zemba Gardens, and the stalls were so pretty-arranged among the trees, and tea tables dotted about in the shade. The Governor performed the opening ceremony, and then liberally patronised each stall. Patricia, as a Red Cross Nurse, collected £12 as a 1/- dip.

We left a few days later as Hugh has retired from the service, and we are now waiting for an opportunity to get over to Australia.

Mollie Salmon.

Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1919 (D/EX1675/6/2/2)

Welcome Home to Returned Heroes

The men of Maidenhead were welcomed back home.

June
Welcome to Returned Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen by CEMS

On Saturday, June 14th, 5.30 to 9.30 pm, at St Luke’s, Vicarage Lawn. The Band of the Comrades of the Great War will play. if any returned Parishioner does not get an invitation, will he please communicate with Mr E Hazeldine, Hon. Sec., 5, College Rise.

July
CEMS Welcome Home to Returned Heroes

It was a happy inspiration of the St Luke’s Branch of the CEMS – which, of course, includes St Peter’s – to give a Welcome Home to the men of St Luke’s Parish, who as Sailors, Soldiers or Airmen have fought for their country in the Great War, together with their wives and sweethearts.

By the kindness of the Vicar, whose absence from home on such a memorable occasion was much regretted – not the least by the Vicar himself – the gathering took place on the Vicarage Lawn on Saturday, June 14th, and, favoured with brilliant weather, proved a great success.

When we say that 800 men and wives accepted the Society’s invitation to tea, it will be realised what a vast amount of work was entailed. But with the organisation in the capable hands of Mr Hazeldine (Hon. Sec.), and Mr Habbin (Chairman of the CEMS), and the willing help of many ladies of St Luke’s and St Peter’s congregations as waitresses, the large party was admirably served.
After tea, there were Concerts, a good programme of music by the Band of the Comrades of the Great War, and performances on the piano and violin by two wounded artistes, all of which was much appreciated. Between the various items were opportunities for conversation with, and congratulations to, the returned warriors – by no means the least enjoyable part of the proceedings – together with a further supply of refreshments. The heartiest thanks of the CEMS are offered to all the kind friends who gave them such valuable assistance in carrying through the “Welcome”, as also to those who generously contributed towards the cost.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, June-July 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

Gratitude for deliverance from the German menace

The War Memorial

The committee met on June 13.

Present: The vicar, the Rev. H B Mead, the two churchwardens, Messrs F B East, W B Waters, H Masters, E Long, G C Sturgess, H B Mole, E Clayton Jones, A H Salman, J A Murray, H Knapman, T R Stevens, F C Edwards, G C Love. Ladies: D A Lawrence, G Fanstone, E Type, N Driscoll, A L Martin, H L Stevens, S Goose, B Newbery. The appointment of Mr Richard Brown and Mr Frank B East as joint treasurers of the fund met with approbation. The newly elected treasurers proceeded to receive the first payments, and a first and most gratifying instalment, in cash and promises, the amount of £407 8s 1d was returned. It was resolved to ask the builder to proceed with the work with as little delay as possible. The committee adjourned to Friday 18 July.

This glorious start, recorded above, may rightly call for a word in these pages. There are hundreds of people round about the church who may like to have a share in this Memorial; and the generosity of the first givers will, we hope, move them to follow their example. As we may have said before, we do not want to beg anyone to give to our memorial porch; we only desire to ask them to decide whether or not they will show their gratitude for deliverance from the German menace in this way. Those who have given, and those who mean to give, know that a considerable sum must be yet obtained if the architect’s fee and builders expenses are to be met. We have a large and determined committee, and they may be relied upon to bring the matter under the notice of the parishioners and worshippers of the church. Outside these there are but a few that can be approached; the amount must be raised amongst ourselves, and we are confident that it will be raised.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

“There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease “

It was hoped that women who had worked together for the benefit of soldiers, might continue to help other deserving causes.

Crazies Hill Notes: Working Party

The Working Party which has done such excellent work during the war, was invited to a final meeting at Hennerton, on Friday, June 13th. There was a very large attendance and the weather was glorious. In the early afternoon the gardens were much enjoyed. Tea was at four o’clock. The party assembled afterwards in the drawing room, where Mrs Rhodes presented Souvenir Cards to all the members.

The Vicar in expressing the thanks of all concerned to Miss Rhodes for the very happy meetings which had been arranged, said that he had been asked to say that the members much hoped that Miss Rhodes would re-open the meetings in the autumn, and that they would be very pleased to work under her kindly leadership for any object she might choose.

This promises very well for the future. There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease altogether. Many people have acquired new habits of industry and there are many good objects which they could greatly benefit.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

A sale of effects at the Military Hospital

War hospitals were closing.

Tuesday, the 10th day of June, 1919

HOUSE COMMITTEE

SALE AT BASINGSTOKE MILITARY HOSPITAL

The Master reported that there would shortly be a sale of effects at the Military Hospital at Basingstoke, and on the proposition of the Rev. A H Caldicott, seconded by the Rev. Sir J Key it was resolved:

That the Master and Matron be authorised to attend the sale and purchase any articles which they might deem expedient.

JUNIOR ASSISTANT NURSE

The Master reported that he had received a personal application for the post of Junior Assistant Nurse from Gertrude Roff of Sandford, Oxon. The Master explained that Mrs Roff desired a post in this district, so as to be near her husband, who was a patient in the Ashurst Military Hospital, and on the proposition of the Rev. A H Caldicott, seconded by Mr Hunt it was resolved:

That it be a recommendation to the Board:

That Mrs G Roff be appointed Junior Assistant Nurse at a salary of £20 per annum, plus an allowance of £4 per annum for uniform, with War Bonus at current rates, and that the appointment be for one month on probation.

REPORT OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE

On the proposition of the Rev. A H Caldicott, seconded by Mr A D Wells it was resolved:

That the appointment of Gertrude Roff to the post of Junior Assistant Nurse for one month on probation be confirmed.

Minutes of Wallingford Board of Guardians (G/W1/36)

Separation allowance for a wife in the asylum

A soldier had difficulties paying for the keep of his mentally ill wife.

10th June 1919

Charles Hicks of Appleton is interviewed by the board with reference by him of the sum of £43.13.10 due to the Guardians for the maintenance of his wife in the Asylum whilst he was away from home on active service, as during a part of the time was being so maintained no Separation Allowance was paid by the Army Authorities, and he asked to have the amount incurred during this period £17.3.2 remitted. And it was resolved that the payment of the £17.3.2 be suspended pending an application to be made by him to the Army Paymaster for payment of the amount and the Clerk is instructed to give him any help he may require in making the application and Mr. Hicks agreed to pay the sum of £26.10.7 the cost of his wife’s maintenance in the Asylum for the period during which Separation Allowance was paid.

The following letters were read and ordered to be filed for future reference namely:-

1. From the Local Government Board…(b) enclosing amended scale of war bonuses recently authorised by the Treasury for permanent Civil Servants

Minutes of Abingdon Board of Guardians (G/A1/33)

A heartfelt “welcome back” to the men who had done and suffered so much for their country and for us

There was a warm welcome home for returning soldiers at Broad Street Chapel.

June

VARIOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS

It is proposed to give a “Welcome Home” to demobilised soldier and sailors connected with the church, in the Schoolroom, on Wednesday June 4th at 7 pm. A limited number of tickets for the tea and subsequent gathering will be sold to other friends at 1/6 each. Application for these tickets should be made to the Chapel-keeper or to any of the deacons.

July

“WELCOME HOME”

On Wednesday June 4th, members of the church and congregation assembled in the Schoolroom to give a cordial “Welcome Home” to men from the church and its various organisations who had been “demobilized”. About forty of these brethren attended, in response to the invitation which had been extended to them, and the whole proceedings were most enjoyable. At 7 o’clock the company sat down to a substantial tea which had been arranged by the wives of the deacons, and when the good things provided had been satisfactorily disposed of, the tables were cleared away for an informal meeting. Miss Vera Smith had very kindly arranged a capital programme of songs, recitations, etc, which were contributed by a number of her friends, and interspersed with the various items short speeches were delivered by several of the deacons.

The Minister was present, but owing to a relaxed throat, he was unable to speak. Mr Chas Steward Smith, JP, presided, and in fitting terms he gave a heartfelt “welcome back to Broad Street” to the men who had done and suffered so much for their country and for us. Other speakers in similar strain were Mr W. J. Brain, Mr Ernest Francis, Mr Swallow, and Mr Tibble. At the close, Mr W. J. Dance and Ex-Sergeant C. S. Stebbings voiced the gratitude of our guests for the welcome accorded them, and for the way in which the church had kept in touch with them by letters and parcels during their absence. The singing of “Auld Lang Syne” fittingly concluded a very happy gathering. Mr J Swallow was secretary, and Mr Tibble treasurer, of the committee which made arrangements for the function.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, June and July 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

We should cherish the memory of those who had laid down their lives to protect us

WE have lost in the war a large number of men who were educated in our Parish Schools, and it was felt it would be fitting that their names should be inscribed on a Roll of Honour to be hung in the Schools as a Memorial.

Mrs. Daubeny very kindly undertook the work, and on May 30th, brought a framed Roll of Honour, beautifully illuminated by herself, and presented it to the School in the presence of the Managers, some parents and other friends.

In well chosen words Mrs. Daubeny made it clear to the children why we should cherish the memory of those who had laid down their lives to protect us, and how their example should always be a srimilis…, and their names and brave self-sacrifice never be forgotten.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/7)

In memory of the men of the Albert Works who fell in the War

The Albert Steam Joinery, run by local firm Elliotts, had sent many of its workers to the war.

A well-attended service was held on May 24th, in memory of the men of the Albert Works who fell in the War, and when the new carved Litany Desk is presented by the Works was dedicated. It is a very handsome piece of work. Mrs Clifford Phillips sang “I know that my Redeemer liveth”, and “The Last Post” and the “Reveille” were sounded by two Buglers from Reading. The choir was present, and Mr Liddle played several appropriate pieces on the organ. We were glad to see a number of the employees of the Works present.

Newbury parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

Abnormal conditions

Wallingford Board of Guardians was reluctant to go along with pay rises for all.

Tuesday, the 20th May 1919

WAR BONUSES

Your Committee went very carefully into the question of War Bonuses which ought to be allotted to the Officials of this Board.

A letter from the Local Government Board was read stating that in accordance with an award of the Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Government Employees dated the 31st day of March, 1919, the Treasury have recently authorised for permanent Civil Servants a new scale of War Bonus, and Dr Addison suggests that Local Authorities might think it well to take this new permanent scale for guidance for fixing or amending War Bonuses for their Employees. It was pointed out in the letter that the Award does not extend to Officers receiving rations, but that in the case of rationed Officers of Local Authorities payments might be made at a lower rate to meet the special circumstances of the case. This letter pointed out that in the case of any difference arising between the Local Authorities and their Officers, the matter in dispute should be submitted to the Chief Independent Commissioners Dept, Ministry of Labour.

A further letter was read from the Conciliation Council for Poor Law Services, which was signed by Mr Herbert Davey, secretary of the Poor Law Unions Association, and Mr John Simons, Secretary, Poor Law Officers Association, which embodied the following resolution. – This Council recommends all Boards of Guardians who have not already done so, to obtain a scale of War Bonuses authorised by the Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Civil Servants, in full for non-resident whole time Officers, and 50 per cent of such scale for resident Officers.
The scales in question, as far as they relate to this Board, are 24/- per week for non-resident permanent Officers plus the equivalent of 10 per cent of their ordinary remuneration, and for resident and rationed Officers, men 12/- per week plus 20 per cent of their ordinary remuneration, and £20 a year for women plus 10 per cent of their ordinary remuneration…

Your Committee very carefully considered in all its bearings the question of increases, and having regard to the observations contained in the Local Government Board circular letter and … it seems there is no course open to this Board but to accept these Awards, and they therefore advise their acceptance, but the Committee wish the Board clearly to understand that the scales in question have been fixed for them and they adopt them with considerable reluctance.

The Committee also wish to draw attention to the last paragraph of the letter of the LGB which states that the increases hereby awarded are to be regarded as temporary increases intended to assist in meeting the increased cost of living owing to the War and to be recognised as due to and dependent on the existence of the abnormal conditions now prevailing.

Report of the General Purposes Committee, in minutes of Wallingford Board of Guardians (G/W1/36)