A danger board due to the PoW camp

Traffic associated with a PoW camp was a danger for local children.

May 6th 1919

Wrote to the Education Secretary recommending that a danger board be placed on the road above the school as owing to the German Prisoners’ Camp there is a good deal of motor traffic now passing the school.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 469)

Advertisements

“Upwards of 50% of those who had made the great sacrifice from the Parish had received their education in this school”

A school wanted its own war memorial.

Speenhamland

Mar 10th

Visit of J E Robbins – Assistant Master of this school. He joined up in 1914 and had just been demobilised. He will recommence work here in about a fortnight’s time.

Meeting of Parishioners held in this room last evening to decide on a War memorial for those who have fallen. After several propositions for windows in the Church etc, I proposed that as upwards of 50% of those who had made the great sacrifice from the Parish had received their education in this school, it would be fitting to put some memorial here as well as elsewhere. I am pleased to say my proposal was received with approbation, and a list of names suitable inscribed will be placed in this school.

Sandhurst

March 10th 1919

Have received a communication from Mr. Newey, lately an assistant master here stating that he hopes to return to school as soon as he is demobilized.

St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1)

Still continuing the War Savings Association work

War savings work continued.

January 15th 1919

Am still continuing the War Savings Association work.

The accounts for the period April-Dec. 31 have been audited and certified correct.

The amount of £101. 13. 6 has been paid in by the children.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 456)

“Right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style”

This supplement to the roll of honour’s bald list of names gives us more detail about the parish’s fallen heroes.

Supplement to the Wargrave Parish Magazine

ROLL OF HONOUR.
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of thy compassion: We remember before thee our brethren who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness of all our sins, and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself to us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

Baker, Edward
Private, 7th Wiltshire Regiment, killed in action on the Salonica Front, April 24th, 1917, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker. He was born at Wargrave and educated at the Piggott School. When the war commenced he was working as a grocer’s assistant in Wargrave. He volunteered in 1915 and was sent out in 1916. He was killed by a shell in a night charge.

Barker, Percy William

Private, 7th Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment/ Killed at Salonica, July 4th 1917, aged 19. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. William Barker at Yeldall Lodge. His father was for twenty years a gardener at Yeldall. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the village school. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. He was one of the most helpful lads on the Boys’ Committee of the Boys’ Club. He volunteered May 11th, 1916. On July 4th, 1917, he was hit by a piece of shell from enemy aircraft while bathing and died within an hour. The Chaplain wrote to his parents “Your loss is shared by the whole battalion”.

Bennett, William
Sergeant, 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in France, Dec 3rd, 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bennett, of Wargrave, and when the war broke out he was working on a farm. He volunteered at once. He was killed instantly by a shell. One of his officers wrote: “Sergt. Bennett was the best N.C.O. we had in the company. Fearless, hardworking, willing, he was a constant inspiration to his platoon. His splendid record must inevitably have led to his decoration. We have lost an invaluable N.C.O. and a fine man. He was buried with all possible reverence about half a mile from Eaucourt L’Abbaye”.

Boyton, Bertram
Lieut., 6th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds in Palestine, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 36. He was educated at King’s College, London, and was a Surveyor and Architect by profession. He was a Fellow of the Surveyors Institute and had won Gold and Silver Medals of the Society of Auctioneers by examination. He was married to Elsie, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Morris, at the Parish Church, Wargrave, Sept. 7th 1905, He was a member of the London Rowing Club and the Henley Sailing Club, and keenly interested in all athletics. He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company in April 1915. He was given a commission in the 6th London R.F.A., in July 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant soon after. He went to France with his battery in June 1916, and to Salonica in the following November. He was sent to Egypt and Palestine in June 1917, and was wounded while taking his battery into action in an advance on November 6th. He died at El Arish on November 9th, 1917.

Buckett, Ernest Frederick

Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action Sept. 20th, 1917, in France, aged 23. The dearly loved husband of Dorothy May Buckett, married May 31st, 1917. He was educated at the Henley National School, and before the War was a slaughterman with Messrs. O’Hara & Lee, butchers, Henley and Wargrave. In 1910 he joined the Berkshire Yeomanry (Territorial Force), and was called up on August 4th, 1914, at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in the spring of 1915. When he had completed his five years service, since the date of his enlistment, he volunteered for another year, but received his discharge as a time-expired man in January 1916. In July, 1916, he was called up under the new regulations and sent immediately to France where he remained, except for leave on the occasion of his marriage, until he fell in action, September 20th, 1917. (more…)

Reading School’s contribution to the war

A complete listing of Reading School’s alumni who had served in the war.

OLD BOYS SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES.

This list has been compiled from information received up to December 14th, 1918; corrections and additions will be welcomed and should be addressed to: – R. Newport, Esq., Reading School, Reading.

Allnatt, Rifleman N.R. — London Rifle Brigade.
(killed in Action).
Ambrose, 2nd Lieut. L.C. — S.L.I.
Anderson, Pte. L.G. — Can. Exp. Force
Appelbee, 2nd Lieut. T. — 13TH West Yorks.
(Killed in Action).
Atkinson, Lieut. E.G. — Indian Army
Atkinson, Capt. G.P. — 6TH Royal North Lancs.
Atkinson, 2nd Lieut. J.C. — R.A.F.
Aust, 2nd Lieut. H.E. — Yorkshire Regt.
(Twice Wounded).
(Killed in Action).
Aveline, Lieut. A.P. — Royal Berks Regt,
(Wounded).
(Military Cross).
Baker, 2nd Lieut. A.C.S. — R.G.A.
Baker, Rifleman A.E. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Rifleman R.S. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Lieut. T.H. — 8TH Royal Berks Regt.
(Wounded)
Balding, Capt. C.D. — Indian Army.
Banks, Pte. W.R. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Bardsley, Capt. R.C — Manchester Regt.
(Wounded).
Barnard, F.P. —
Barroby, Trooper. F. — Strathcona Horse.
Barry, Capt. L.E. — R.A.F.
Baseden, Lieut. E. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Baseden, 2nd Lieut. M.W. — R.A.F.
Batchelor, Lieut. A.S. — Duke of Cornwall’s L.I.
Bateman, Capt. W.V. — Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Bayley, 2nd Lieut. F. — Chinese Labour Battalion.
Beckingsale, Pte. R.S. — Canadian Contingent.
Beckingsale, Capt. R.T. — Tank Corps (Military Cross).
(Wounded).

Belsten, E.K. — R.A.F.
Biddulph, 2nd Lieut. R.H.H. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Died of Wounds).
Bidmead, Pte. — Wilts regt.
Black, Pte. F. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Blazey, A.E.H. — R.A.F.
Blazey, 2nd Lieut. J.W. — Royal Berks Regt
(killed in Action).
Bleck, Lieut. W.E. — R.F.A.
Bliss, 2nd Lieut. A.J. — Leinster Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Bliss, Pte. W. — 2ND Batt.Hon.Art.Coy. (more…)

“Our day”

Sandhurst children were raising money for the wounded, while those in Reading needed nursing themselves. “Our day” was a branded campaign used across the country to help raise money for the war.

Lower Sandhurst
October 24th 1918

“Our Day.”

Eight monitors in suitable dress visited the Class Rooms to sell flags of their own making. The amount thus realised was £2. 12. 4.

In the afternoon the “Red Cross Box” was opened in the presence of the Collectors and found to contain £2. 8. 0.

A total amount of £5. 0. 4 was forwarded to the local Hon. Secretary for “Our Day.”

Windsor
October 24th 1918

Mr. J. W. Beaumont has been given a Commission in the Royal Air Service and relinquished his duties.

East Ilsley
24th October 1918

Children willing to go blackberrying for M.O.F allowed to go – others remain at work.

Reading
24th October 1918

School closed for Influenza until Nov 5th.

Log books of Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL66/1, p. 451);St Stephen’s Boys’ School, Windsor (88/SCH/23/7, p. 166); East Ilsley CE School (C/EL39/1, p. 488); Alfred Sutton Primary School, Reading (89/SCH/37/1, p. 249)

Jam for the soldiers

The children were paid for their berrying activities.

Boyne Hill
Sept: 26th

Owing to the necessity of economy in the consumption of fuel and lighting it has been decided to open all schools at 1.30 pm instead of 2 pm from Oct: 1st.

Great Coxwell
26th September 1918

Instead of nature study walk, children went black-berrying this afternoon. The berries (13lbs) to be made into jam for the soldiers.

Aldermaston
26th September 1918.

Half day for blackberrying, 58lbs.

Lower Sandhurst
September 26th 1918

I paid the sum of £30 – 8s – 5d to the children for blackberry picking.


Log books: Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3); Great Coxwell CE School (C/EL81/2, p. 81); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL/66/1, p. 449); and Aldermaston School (88/SCH/3/3, p. 94)

Going out to pick blackberries for the soldiers

Strikes at home caused problems for many people.

Little Coxwell
Sept 25th

The older children are going out to pick blackberries for the soldiers in the afternoon.

Lower Sandhurst
September 25th 1918

The last half-holiday for blackberry picking was given this afternoon. 258 lbs. picked. The School has picked in rather over a fortnight 2465 lbs. of fruit for the Ministry of Food.


Datchet
25 September 1918

Miss Riley absent through Railway strike – came in 10.30 & walked from Staines.

Sparsholt
Sept 25th

The children were granted a half holiday this afternoon to gather blackberries for the Ministry of Food.

Log books: Little Coxwell CE School (C/EL80); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL/66/1); Datchet National Mixed School (SCH30/8/3); Sparsholt CE School D/P115/28/47)

From the Front to a football match

Some teachers were less enthusiastic than others about letting youngsters spend time picking berries and helping farmers, while soldiers on leave returned to their old school to play current pupils at football.

Windsor
20th September 1918

Eight old boys who are serving in His Majesty’s Forces visited the school this morning and assisted by three of the present scholars played a football match with the school team, the old boys winning by 4 goals to 2.

Braywick
20th September 1918

The classes went for berries on two fine afternoons, on Wednesday and Friday. The results of the pickings are very satisfactory.

Thatcham
Sep: 20th

Registers not marked this afternoon – blackberrying. 198 lbs sent in, making a total for the week of 519 lbs.

Sandhurst
September 20th 1918

Half holiday for blackberry picking. 297 lbs. sent.

Buscot
Sept. 20

Older children went blackberrying in the afternoon; 85 ½ lbs gathered.


Log books:

Hampstead Norreys
1918
20th Sep

The children this week have again been busy picking blackberries. The weather has been very changeable, and we have had to catch an hour or two whenever we could, so that in several cases we have been unable to send the children straightaway, having had to keep them until the blackberries dried. In these cases we marked registers.

We weighed out & paid for 479 lbs of blackberries during the week.

In the limited school time at our disposal we have mostly kept up the Reading Writing and Arithmetic.

Speenhamland
1918
Sept 20th

Attendance poor; four of St VI gone to pick up potatoes for Mr Whitington [sic] – they seem to have got permission from the Authority – Cecil Bishop has also got permission. I do not think this should be.

The school was closed on Tuesday afternoon for the children to gather blackberries but they got very few – only 190 lbs; we shall not go again.

Some of the girls took wood away from Mrs Farquhar’s property, and she wrote an indignant letter to the Vicar and another to myself. I wrote to her, and expressed regret.

Buscot
Sept. 20

Older children went blackberrying in the afternoon; 85 ½ lbs gathered.

Thatcham
Sep: 20th
Registers not marked this afternoon – blackberrying. 198 lbs sent in, making a total for the week of 519 lbs.


Log books of Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School log book (C/EL72/3, p. 193); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 204); Thatcham CE School (C/EL53/4); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL/66/1, p. 448); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2);St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2)
; Thatcham CE School (C/EL53/4)

Blackberrying

More blackberrying by Berkshire children.

Aldermaston
17th September 1918

Half holiday to pick blackberries, 89lbs picked and sent off by evening train.

Lower Sandhurst
September 17th 1918

Half holiday this afternoon for blackberrying.

Datchet
17 September 1918

Blackberrying this afternoon.

Buscot
Sept 17th

Older children with 2 teachers went blackberrying; 93 ¼ lbs gathered, weighed and sent to Central Agent.

Log books: Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL/66/1, p. 447); Datchet National Mixed School (SCH30/8/3, p. 406); and Aldermaston School (88/SCH/3/3, pp. 93-94); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2)

Sent off by the evening train

Children collected wild blackberries for jam to help oombat food shortages.

Thatcham
1918
Sep: 16th

Money earned by children picking blackberries received, £5.11.3. This was divided amongst the children according to the number of pounds each had picked.

Goosey
September 16th 1918

The children of classes I and II will be taken out for the purpose of gathering black berries for M.O.F during the school sessions in not more than three half days per week.

Aldermaston
16th September 1918

The children on three half days each week when fine will go under teachers supervision to pick blackberries for Ministry of Food. Half holiday to pick blackberries, 56lbs picked and sent off by evening train.

Lower Sandhurst
September 16th 1918

The children gathered 215 lbs. of blackberries after school this afternoon.

Datchet
16 September 1918

Blackberrying.

Log books: Thatcham CE School (C/EL53/4); Goosey CE School (C/EL89/1, p. 169); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL/66/1, p. 447); Datchet National Mixed School (SCH30/8/3, p. 406); and Aldermaston School (88/SCH/3/3, pp. 93-94)

Blackberrying again

It was another productive afternoon.

Sandhurst
September 13th 1918

Blackberrying half-holiday.

346 lbs. gathered.

Braywick
13th September

The girls accompanied, by the teachers went berrying on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday afternoons, and secured over 70 lbs which were duly weighted, packed and sent to Mr Harris.

Buscot
Sept. 13th

Older children taken out blackberrying (1.45 pm – 3.50 pm); 67 ¼ lbs gathered and forwarded to central agent.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p.447); Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4, p. 204); Buscot CE School log book (C/EL73/2)

A half holiday for blackberry picking

Sandhurst children had the chice of schoolwork or gathering berries for jam for the soldiers.

Sandhurst
September 11th 1918

A half holiday given to-day for blackberry picking. Those children not joining in the work were kept at school.

A total of 171 lbs. was the result.

Cookham Rise
11/9/18

School closed in the afternoon for blackberry gathering.


Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p.447); Cookham Rise County Primary School log book (C/EL71)

Picking postponed

Braywick
7th September 1918

The schools are invited to pick blackberries for the government, for jam, and three hay days allowed to school girls. The weather, however, as yet, has not been fortunate, so the picking has had to be postponed until the weather becomes more settled. The cookery class was resumed on opening school.

Sandhurst
September 7th 1918

Saturday. The day being fine, the children were encouraged to make an attempt to gather one cwt. Of blackberries. At the end of the day I was able to send off 13 baskets containing 246 lbs. of fruit.

Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4, p. 203); Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p.446)

Blackberry jam for the troops

Blackberry picking by schoolchildren continued.

Lower Sandhurst School
September 6th 1918

A half-holiday was given to-day to enable the children to gather blackberries. Unfortunately the weather was showery and only a small quantity was picked. Five baskets containing eighty-two pounds were despatched to the Central Office.

Maidenhead Gordon Road Boys School
September 6th 1918

Half Holiday. The elder children taken by the teachers to get blackberries to make jam for the troops.


Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p.446); Maidenhead Gordon Road Boys School log book (C/EL/107/1, p.112)