Flag waving children greet the Royal Family

Reading children were excited to witness a royal visit.

George Palmer Boys’ School
12th March 1918

Visit to Reading of H.M. King George & H.M. Queen Mary. Assembled school at 9.30 and marched along Elgar Rd, Field Road, Carey St. & Howard St to Oxford Road, lining the street between the premises of Messrs Callas, Sons & May Ltd, and Messrs Dunlops Ltd. The royal party was seen on its way to No.1 War Hospital & on its return. Flags were kindly lent to the boys by Mr Drew, proprietor R.F.S.C.

St Giles Boys’ School, Reading
12th March 1918

Boys were allowed to go to Jackson’s Corner to see HM the King and his Queen. They returned to school.

Battle Infants School
15th March 1918

The Head Mistress was not in school till 1.50 o’clock on Tuesday [12 March] as permission was granted to witness the ceremony of the reception of representative inhabitants and war workers of the town, by their Majesties, the King and Queen, in the Town Hall.

Redlands Boys’ School, Reading
March 12th 1918
The School marched to Broad Street marching at 1.55, in order to see the King and Queen passing the factory. At 3.30 the Scholars returned and were dismissed when close to the School.

Alfred Sutton Primary School, Reading
12th March 1918

The Infants’ school is very small on account of the King’s visit, the Junior pupils are being taken by the teachers to see the procession.

Sonning CE Girls and Infants
12th March 1918

School closed for children to see the King in Reading.

Lower Sandhurst School
March 12th 1918

I was absent from school during the latter part of the afternoon as I was attending a War Savings Conference at Wellington.

Log books of George Palmer Boys’ School (89/SCH/8/1, p. 149); Reading St Giles Boys School (R/ES2/9, p. 259); Reading: Battle Infants School (SCH20/8/2, p. 312); Redlands Boys’ School, Reading (86/SCH/3/30, p. 335)Alfred Sutton Primary School log book (89/SCH/37/1, p. 246); Sonning CE Girls and Infants’ School (89/SCH/1/4, p. 284); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL66/1, p. 429)


Trying to ‘do their bit’

Food shortages were encouraging people to take up growing heir own fruit and veg.

Food Production.

The Committee of the Crowthorne, S. Sebastian, Finchampstead and Sandhurst Horticultural Society has decided to hold a Fruit and Vegetable Show during the month of October, the idea being to encourage the cultivation of food to the greatest extent possible. For this same purpose the Wokingham Horticultural Society has just been formed and proposes to hold a Show on Sept. 25th.

In this connection the ‘Wolf Cubs’ are trying to ‘do their bit’ on a piece of ground kindly lent to them.

Will anyone send them along a few seeds, but more especially seed potatoes.

Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine, March 1918 (D/P154C/28A/1)

Helping the villagers to fill in forms for rationing

Two more schools were helping with the implementation of rationing, while Warfield children’s gathering of horse chestnuts had resulted in a bumper crop to turn into munitions. But not everyone was pulling together.

Sandhurst Methodist School
March 4th 1918

I (the master) was at the New hall, Sandhurst, this morning from 10-12, giving advice and help to villagers to fill in forms for rationing.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School
8th March 1918

School closed for teachers to assist with Food forms.

Warfield CE School log book (C/EL26/3)
4th March 1918

The chestnuts collected by the scholars have been sent to the munitions works.

1918, 4 March

Sacks for chestnuts received this morning with letter from Minister of Propellants explaining that delay is due to Railway [?] neglect!

Log books of Sandhurst Methodist School Log Book (C/EL42/2, p. 161); Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School (90/SCH/5/3, p. 41); Warfield CE School (C/EL26/3, p. 390); Wallingford Boys Council School (SCH22/8/3)

Willing to pay a substitute

A Maidenhead teacher was so desperate to spend her husband’s short leave with him, she paid the salary of her substitute.

25th February 1918

Mrs Wells wanted leave of absence for three days owing to her husband’s leave before returning to France. She was willing to pay a substitute & Mistress obtained services of Mrs Eustace of St Luke’s Rd. Notice of this leave was sent to the office.

Lower Sandhurst
February 25th 1918

Admitted 3 children from London.

Log books of King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1, p. 413); and Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 424)

Taking refuge from the air-raids

Another family fled to the safety of Berkshire.

February 11th 1918
Admitted another boy from London whose mother is taking refuge from the air-raids.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 424)

Ladies and younger lads keep the bells going, with energy & zeal

Bellringers reflect on the ways the war had changed their profession.

The annual meeting of this branch took place at Wokingham on Sat. Jan. 19th. A short service was held at All Saints’ Church at 4.30 pm with Intercessory Prayers…

The Rural Dean, Canon G F Coleridge, gave an excellent address, & practical, on the words – “Every man according to his ability” (Acts XI.29). He said he had chosen those words, because they brought home what was being done throughout the country regarding the “War”, at that time, & they should appeal with great force & meaning to those present, as Church Bell Ringers. Many of these, amongst other church officers, had been called to active service abroad, some of them from that branch, of whom some had given their lives for their country, & many ladies & younger lads had taken their places, & kept the bells goings, with an energy & zeal which would always be remembered in the Ringing world!…

The National Anthem was heartily sung at the close…

Tow members had been killed in action during the year. – A Edwards & F Collins, while G Collins was still “missing”, as in last year.

Minutes of Sonning Deanery Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers
(for bellringers of the parish churches of Arborfield, Easthampstead, Finchampstead, Hurst, Sandhurst, Sonning, Wargrave, Wokingham All Saints and Wokingham St Paul) (D/EX2436/2)

A commercial kitchen for school children

School dinners, promised a week or two earlier, were instituted in Aldermaston, while an old boy came to visit his old teacher in Sandhurst.

Aldermaston School
15th January 1918

A commercial kitchen was started in the village hall today, for the benefit of the school children, 57 children availed themselves of the opportunity, and were made up as follows- 23 over 10 years of ages, 20 under 10 years and over 7, 14 under 7 years.

Lower Sandhurst School
January 15th 1918

William Worrall, an old boy of the school, now a midshipman in the Royal Navy, came to see me to-day.

Aldermaston School log book (88/SCH/3/3, p. 80); Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 421)

King George’s Sailors’ Fund gets a boost

Children and teachers at Sandhurst supported a new charity for merchant seamen affected by the war.

December 18th 1917

Sent £3. 16. 0 to the ‘Daily Telegraph’ for ‘King George’s Sailors’ Fund’. This amount has been contributed during the past few weeks by the teachers and children.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 419)

London children find safety

More refugees from London arrived in Berkshire.

October 29th 1917

Admitted five children from London.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 415)

More children from London

More informal evacuees had fetched up in Sandhurst.

October 22nd 1917
Admitted five more children from London. There are now 341 children on Roll.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 414)

Flags and horse chestnuts

The patriotic children of Lower Sandhurst were still keen to contribute to the war effort.

October 18th 1917

‘Our Day.’

The children made Red Cross flags for sale for the fund.

Our collection box was opened and was found to contain £1 – 14 – 0 which sum was forwarded to the Secretary of the local Red Cross Committee.

One cwt. of horse-chestnuts was forwarded for the manufacture of munitions.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 414)

Visitors from London

The attacks on London had led to many families fleeing to the safety of Berkshire.

October 1st 1917
Owing to air raids in London several visitors are in this district. Have admitted 6 children in consequence.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 413)

Sandhurst children help the Red Cross

Sandhurst children supported the Red Cross.

July 5th 1917
Forwarded the sum of £1 – 17 – 0 to the British Red Cross Society as a further contribution from the School Collecting Box.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 406)

“May blossoms and war seem as though they ought to be impossible in the same world”

The minister of Maidenhead Congregational Church tried to encourage members to look on the bright side of life despite all the horrors and losses of the war.

May blossoms and war seem as though they ought to be impossible in the same world. The dreadful mud in the midst of which our soldiers have been living is more congruous with the spirit of warfare than sweet grass and hawthorn buds. Many letters from the front have spoken of the start of surprise with which a lark’s song is heard over the trenches. We have all, when some sorrow is heavy upon us, felt a sort of astonishment that the sun should go on shining, and the birds twittering, and passers by smiling, as though nothing had happened. But the worst of sorrows cannot cover the whole sky. We want taking out of ourselves at times. Evils won’t bear brooding over, we only make them worse. We shall be able to bear “the strain of toil, the fret of care” better, if we make rich use of the ministry of the blossoms.


We are glad to hear that Reginald Hill is progressing, though slowly. He has had several operations, and probably must undergo two or three more. The doctors think he may have to be in bed for at least three months yet, but they hope he will make quite a good recovery.

We regret deeply to have to record that John Boyd, formerly the Caretaker of the Chapel, was killed in action on March 29th. He enlisted in the 2nd Berks. In June 1916, and was sent to France on Sept. 22nd. He was a most genial and kind-hearted man, and had a wide circle of friends among whom he was very popular. We offer our Christian sympathy to Mrs. Boyd and her family.

It is distressing too to hear that Stephen Harris is returned as “missing.” The Captain of his Company has written to Mr. and Mrs. Harris that he has made all possible inquiries and can gain no information. The best that can be hoped for is that he may be a prisoner in German hands. Robert Harris was killed in July last. May God grant His patience and consolation to the distressed parents.

Wallace Mattingly has been admitted to Sandhurst Military College for eight months’ training. G. Frampton is expecting to be called up immediately. We are glad to see Cyril Hews at home again on leave, looking in the pink of health. P.S. Eastman writes in good spirits from “somewhere in the East.”

He says, “I have not yet left for the special work for which I was sent out, but may do so any day now. In the meantime I have had quite a variety of work, until at present I find myself in the C.O.’s office. Yesterday I had a line from Frank Pigg, who is with the R.F.C in Salonica; may be one of these days I shall be able to pay him a visit.”

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, May 1917 (D/N33/12/1/5)

Another old boy has given up his life for his country

There was yet more sad news for Lower Sandhurst School.

May 26th 1917
Another old boy Alfred Seaby has given up his life for his country.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 403)