A memorial cross to be erected in the churchyard

16th September 1919
The vicar read prayers this morning and afterwards appealed to the boys to assist in contributing towards a memorial cross to be erected in the churchyard.

Log book of Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School (C/EL72/3, p. 214)

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The time is approaching when the names will be wanted

Burghfield was finalising its list of names for the war memorial.

The War

Private Joseph West, of Trash Green (late Rifle Brigade), has just been mentioned in dispatches. He was wounded at Neuve Chapelle in March, 1915, and was discharged about a year later. Congratulations to him on his belated honour.

Mr Willink hopes that any Burghfield men who has received any mark of distinction not already announced in this magazine will communicate with him.

He hopes also that relatives of Burghfield men who have lost their lives on service in the war will take the trouble of studying the Roll of Honour in the inner Church Porch, and also the List of the Fallen which rests against the screen inside the church near the lectern, and that they will notify him of any omissions or mis-statements which should be attended to. The time is approaching when the names will be wanted for inscription upon the cross to be erected in the churchyard.

Burghfield parish magazine, September 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A want long felt

Clewer had decided on a recreation ground for its memorial.

The Parish War Memorial

The following circular has been issued by the Memorial Committee, and will be distributed amongst the subscribers:-

Dear Sir or Madam,

The Committee are glad to be able to announce that they have acquired a piece of land about six acres in extent in a very central part of the parish, for the purpose of a Recreation Ground – a want that has long been felt. The sum of £422 17s. 10d. has already been subscribed and some £250 more is necessary to complete the purchase, laying out and fencing. It is earnestly hoped that those who have not already supported the Fund will kindly contribute now and so share in providing a permanent War Memorial to the gallant men of the parish who have laid down their lives for King and Country.

Yours faithfully,

Clewer parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)

It is very important that the list of names of those who died should be accurate

Plans were well advanced for the memorial at St Bartholomew’s Church.

The War Memorial

The committee met on Sept 4 at 7.30pm. There was a good attendance. Present: The Chairman, Mr Churchwarden Brown and Mr FB East (hon. Treasurers), the Rev. H B Mead, Messrs. W Lawrence, A H Salman, H Masters, J A Murray, G C Sturgess, T R Stevens, E Clayton Jones, A J H Wright, E Long; Ladies – Mrs Newbery, Miss Goose, Miss Stevens, Miss Lawrence, Miss Driscoll, Miss Type.

The minutes of the last meeting were confirmed. The chairman read a letter from the architect saying that the drawings for the builder were on the point of completion. It was suggested that the names be cut into the oak panelling to avoid difficulty in adding names sent in late and to avoid expense. It was agreed that the porch be lined with stone and the two shields carved with emblems. Mrs Newbery kindly consented to include the lower part of Cumberland Road in her district. Subscriptions received to date were paid in, with one new promise. The treasurers reported at the close of the proceedings as follows:-

Subscriptions paid or promised, as already announced £455 10s 0d
New subscriptions Sept 4 £21 10s 2d
New promises £5 0s 0d

The date of the next committee meeting was fixed for Thurs Oct 16 at 7.30pm.

Since the above meeting, a letter has been received from Mr Comper suggesting that the shields should bear “the three knives ascribed to S Bartholomew on one and Reading (emblem) on the other.” He is glad that the committee consents to stone lining of the porch, and adds “You must have the names cut on a stone or slate (and not oak) slab which will form part of the stone lining of the walls recessed within a simple shallow moulding. This, I believe, will cost no more, and be durable, and part of the fabric as it ought to be. The slab need not be fixed till the walls are built…. I dare say that you will be content with the surnames and initials …. Prefixed by some inscription.

Upon this we would say that it is very important that the list of names of those who died should be accurate, and any known name, not at present posted up in the church under the flag, should be given to the Vicar without delay.

Mr F N A Garry has presented a stone beautifully carved with old Christian emblems, which Mr Comper desires to be placed 5 feet from the floor within the porch on the west wall south of the entrance. We have also to thank Mr S Newbery for making a copy of the drawing of the porch which is hung on the church door.


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

An Institution in which disabled sailors and soldiers could be taught crafts and trades and thus become able to do useful work would be the best form of memorial

What form should a county-wide memorial take?

1 September 1919

The suggestions as to the form of the memorial put forward by Lady Wantage, Alderman Cox, Brigadier General Wigan, Mr Bartholomew of the Oxford Street Social Club and Lt Col Walsh were considered. None of the suggestions were regarded favourably and the meeting discussed generally what kind of memorial would seem most suitable having regard to the fact that a County Memorial was wanted.

Schemes of a utilitarian nature were favoured by Alderman Martin and also by Councillor Quelch, but each referred to the question of a scheme of the kind having a limited radius of usefulness and could not benefit the whole county. Mr F G Belcher suggested that an Institution in which disabled sailors and soldiers could be taught crafts and trades and thus become able to do useful work would be the best form of memorial. He alluded to the monotony of the lives of these poor men, and the need to do everything possible to provide them with interests in life. As an alternative he suggested the establishment of an Orphanage to benefit the children of the men who had fallen in the war. The Chairman pointed out that in any such Institution the question of endowments to provide an income for its maintenance must be met and also that the need of either kind of Institution would pass away within a limited number of years.

It was proposed by Councillor Quelch and seconded by Alderman Martin, “that in all the circumstances and having regard to the fact that no scheme of a utilitarian nature would be likely to benefit the whole county, this Committee is compelled to fall back on the proposal to erect a suitable monument as a permanent memorial in commemoration of the sailors and soldiers of Berkshire who had lost their lives in the war”. Passed unanimously.

Councillor Quelch proposed and Alderman Martin seconded “that the architects of Berkshire be invited to assist the Committee by submitting, voluntarily, sketch plans of such designs as would in their opinion be suitable for the purpose required.” Passed unanimously.

It was mentioned that some 8000 to 10000 names would require to be inscribed.

The question of site was spoken of, and Councillor Quelch undertook to bring the subject forward at the next meeting of the Markets and Estates Committee of the [Reading] Town Council who would no doubt consider the possibility of assisting the project by offering sites which might be suitable for the building of the monument.

The Secretary was requested to ascertain the terms upon which the triangular piece of land at the junction of Caversham Road and Friar Street could be acquired in the event of its being a fitting position for the memorial.

Berkshire War Memorial Committee minutes (R/D134/3/1)

A reception for the Boys returning from the war

The men who had served from London Street Primitive Methodist Church were honoured.

26 August 1919

Resolved…

That as regards the unveiling ceremony,

(a) It be held on Wednesday 1st October at 7.30 pm
(b) That Rev E J T Bagnall preside.
(c) That Mr Waite be asked to receive memorial on behalf of Trustees.
(d) That Mr Smith be asked to present his roll of honour to the church.
(e) That Mr Smith speak first & Mr Alderson to follow.
(f) That Mr Drew be asked to arrange for suitable music.

That reception be held for the Boys returning from the war on following night, viz Oct 2/19.

That committee consisting of Mr Cheyney, Mr Pierce, & Ferguson arrange for the supper.

That Mr Cheyney, I Godden, A Chilton, arrange concert etc.

That reception be limited to Boys & one friend each. Trustees & Leaders to act as Waiters.

London Street Primitive Methodist Church trustees’ minutes (D/MS59/1A/2)

A touching memorial

Lockinge-born William Hallam, living across the border in Swindon, was moved by a war memorial.

24th August 1919

Wife and I went to St. Paul’s this morning. A touching ceremony was the unveiling – after the service – of a memorial window to Lieut. James who died of wounds.

Diary of William Hallam of Swindon (D/EX1415/26)

Love for those who have defended us, especially those who have given freely of their lives that we might live

Important – War Memorial Chapel at St Luke’s

At last, after much preliminary work, we are launching this scheme of ours, by which we are trying by beautifying our Church to mark our gratitude to God for his protection and care, and our love for those who have defended us, more especially for those who have given freely of their lives that we might live. Briefly, we hope to build (where the Vestries now stand) a Chapel panelled in oak with the names of the fallen on each panel, in which we may hold quiet services, and where, overshadowed by the sense of the presence of those we love that have passed beyond the veil, we may meditate without bitterness on the wonderful mystery of suffering and sacrifice, as made more clear to our finite minds, by the Cross of the Son of God, in whose House we shall be at prayer.

All our generosity and the help of our friends will be needed, if we are to do this worthily. At a meeting held on August 21st, Miss Apthorp – well-known to us as Commandant of the VAD Hospital – was unanimously elected as Hon, Sec. of the Fund. Reluctantly, as a mere clergyman, I accepted the office of Hon. Treasurer. An account has been opened at the London, County, Westminster and Parr’s Bank in High Street, called the “St Luke’s War Memorial Fund”.

A circular letter, we hope, will shortly be distributed to every house in the Parish, except in Furze Platt, which has its own scheme. If any are left by accident outside the Parish, it will be by mistake. Of course, any friend may obtain one personally by asking for a copy. Then collectors will call. I hope every house will give something. The names of all the fallen from the Parish (whatever their religious views) will have the first claim to a place on a panel, unless anyone’s relatives do not wish them to be remembered there. After that we will place the names of all worshippers at St Luke’s. Any doubtful case will be decided after taking full advice.

The scheme adopted is to try and raise the money in twelve months, beginning this September.

I hope very much that all who can, will give a monthly subscription, even if they cannot give a large donation. Personally, I have given a donation, and I intend to give each month as well. So far, the biggest donation has been £25, but I hope that will soon be surpassed; and a shilling a month, please remember, means 12/- by next year. Some good collectors have already volunteered, but we want many more. Each collector will be given a card with 25 houses on, and will bring the card to Miss Apthorp to be initialled on the Monday after the first Sunday of each month, either between 10 am or 1 pm in the morning, or between 6 pm and 8 pm in the evening, giving her any money they have collected during the previous month. From October 1st Miss Apthorp will be at Stanlow, High Town Road; till then her address is Ray Court. The first paying-I day will be Monday, October 6th. Miss Apthorp will take the money, initial the card, and return it to the collector. If any collector is ill, if Miss Apthorp is notified, she will call for the money. Further volunteers are asked to inform Miss Apthorp at Ray Court or the Vicar at the Vicarage of their readiness to undertake a district.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

A Peace oak in Remenham

The happy suggestion has been made that we should plant a “Peace Oak” in the field adjoining the School as a memorial of the close of the War. The suggestion has been warmly received, and the tree will be planted as soon as the suitable time comes.

Remenham parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P99/28A/5)

After paying the expenses of the Peace Celebrations there will be a surplus remaining

There was a peace bonus for Burghfield children.

Peace Celebrations and War Memorial

The Committee appointed at the second General Meeting of the 17th June (see July Magazine) met on 14th August. The accounts will be audited and published in due course. But it may be stated that after paying the expenses of the Peace Celebrations there will be a surplus remaining. The Committee decided to allot £10 of this to the provision of suitable games, tackle and appliances for the use of the children in all the schools – the remainder to be added to the Memorial Fund.

Of this latter Fund it was decided that three quarters should be available for the provision and erection of the proposed Cross in the Churchyard, and one quarter for the sports and recreation grounds of the parish; and two sub-committees were appointed to enquire and report upon these two latter matters.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1919 (D/EX725/4)

The dawn of peace is a time when high ideals are needed more than ever

By the summer of 1919 some were unhappy with the way the country was going in peacetime.

Editorial

The dawn of peace is a time when high ideals are needed more than ever. A well known cartoonist in Punch has recently represented John Bull lying lazily in a hammock with a pipe in his mouth and refreshments at his side, sighing, “Funny thing how slack this victory feeling makes you. I’ve done nothing since last November. Wonder if a spell of work would cure me.” Where restraint and self-sacrifice were merely enforced during the war, there has been a sharp re-action in favour of license and self-indulgence. The strike epidemic is one form of it. The voluntary sacrifice that is recorded by war memorials up and down the country – memorials which sometimes bear the names of 10,000 men of one regiment – leaves a very different heritage; courage, endurance, vision: vision, not the fading illusion of the unpractical dreamer of dreams, but the inquiring ideal which the prophet had in mind when he said, “Where there is no vision the people perish”.

Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1919 (D/EX1675/6/2/2)

“An exact copy of the single crosses which are to be erected in France and Belgium will link up our churchyard with the resting places of our gallant men who have fallen out there”

Burghfield planned a simple yet effective war memorial.

The result of the collection for the Celebration Fund and the Memorial Fund is not yet known as we go to press.

Until the amount of the latter at their disposal is ascertained, the Committee can hardly consider how to spend it. At present, as regards the Cross, the only suggestion made is that it should be an exact copy of the single crosses which are to be erected in France and Belgium, one in each cemetery. It is argued that this will, as it were, link up our churchyard with the resting places of our gallant men who have fallen out there, and will not be inappropriate for those whose deaths occurred elsewhere.

Burghfield parish magazine, August 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A Reredos for the Side Altar

Plans were advancing for the Clewer church memorial.

Mr. F. E. Howard, the architect employed by the War Memorial Committee for the Brocas Chapel has been requested to prepare a design for a Reredos for the Side Altar, which will cost about £100. Towards this we have in hand about £80. Further contributions are invited.

Clewer parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)

Any selfishness of any class must stand in the way of real peace and happiness at home

The vicar of Newbury urged a generous spirit in rebuilding national life, and thought servicemen should have first call on all jobs.

The long hoped for signing of the Peace Treaty has taken place, and the Nation has joined together in humble and hearty thanksgiving to Almighty God for His great and undeserved mercies. It is impossible to imagine from what horrors we have been saved by His goodness, and through the willing sacrifice of so many of our splendid men, and the courage and energy of millions, both men and women. If the terms imposed by the Allies on Germany seem hard they would have been nothing to the terms they would have imposed on us if they had won, and for generations our Country would not have recovered, if ever it did recover. Thanks be to God for His mercy to us.

And now we have to reconstruct our National Life. That is no easy task, and it calls for the spirit of willing co-operation and sacrifice from all classes. Any selfishness of any class must stand in the way of real peace and happiness at home. It is the duty surely of employers to give returned soldiers and sailors the first chance of employment, even if it means displacing someone else, and those who have fought and endured should have no just cause for grievances. The Government will have to put down profiteering with a strong hand, and should also severely punish the professional agitator and “him that stirreth up strife among brethren”. While all of us should do our best to spread the spirit of love and service. God has been gracious to us and now it is for us to prove ourselves worthy of His favour.

Sunday, July 6th, was observed as a day of Thanksgiving for Peace, and the services were well attended. The Municipal and National rejoicings took place on July 19th. There was unfortunately a lot of rain, and the children’s tea had to take place in different buildings instead of all together on the Cricket Field. The Procession in London must have been a magnificent sight.

The War Memorial Committee have had two meetings lately, the first with Mr C O Skilbeck to advise them, and the second with Mr Cogswell for the same purpose. They hope soon to have a design from the latter to put before the congregation and parishioners.

Newbury parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

A memorial commemorative of those who have served in the war as well as those who have lost their lives in it

The great and good of Berkshire gathered to consider a county war memorial. They decided ordinary soldiers should be involved too.

30 July 1919
Meeting of the War Memorial General Committee held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, Reading, on the 30th July 1919.

Present
J H Benyon esquire, Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire, Chairman
Stanley Hayward esquire, Mayor of Reading, Vice Chairman
Mrs L Hayward, Mayoress of Reading
Col T J Bowles
Louis H Beard esquire, Constable of Hungerford
Councillor W E Collier
F J K Cross esquire
W Dockar Drysdale esquire
Ernest Gardner esquire, MP
Rev F J C Gillmor
S H Hodgkin esquire
Councillor W R Howell
Dr J B Blay
Councillor Edward Jackson
A J Mackay esquire
Councillor Frank E Moring
H C Mylne esquire, Mayor of Wokingham
Councillor Thomas Norris
W Howard Palmer esquire
Major M L Porter
Councillor L E Quelch
F A Sargeant esquire, Deputy Mayor of Reading
Councillor Wm Sparks
Edmund Stevens esquire
E M Sturges esquire
G A Watson esquire
Col George S Willes

The Deputy Clerk of the Berkshire County Council submitted the resolutions adopted at the Public Meeting held on the 22nd July appointing and defining the duties of the Committee.

This being the first meeting of the Committee since their appointment the Committee proceeded to elect a Chairman and Vice Chairman, when J H Benyon esquire, Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire, was elected to be Chairman and Stanley Hayward esquire, Mayor of Reading, was elected to be Vice Chairman.

The Deputy Clerk of the Berkshire County Council read apologies for absence from the following:

Lady Wantage
Col F W Foley
Brigadier General J E Wigan
Alderman F A Cox
Lt Col Leslie Wilson MP
P E Crutchley esquire
W Crosland esquire
Col J C Carter
W Carter esquire, Mayor of Windsor
Sir Geo Young, bart
Major C W Darby-Griffith
C Adrian Hawker esquire
Rev W M Rawlinson
F A Simonds esquire
Mrs G S Abram

The Committee then considered the appointment of a secretary and
Resolved: That, if he be willing to act, Mr E W J Arman, late Postmaster of Reading, be appointed Honorary Secretary to the Committee.

The Deputy Clerk of the Berkshire County Council submitted a letter, dated 28th July, which the Town Clerk of Reading had received from Col F W Foley, expressing the opinion that more members of the rank and file of the many battalions of the Royal Berkshire Regiment should serve on the Committee, and, upon consideration thereof,

It was Resolved: That three nominations of NCOs or men for representation on the Committee be invited from each of the following:

1. The regular battalions of the Royal Berkshire Regiment.
2. The Berkshire Territorial Force Association.
3. The Comrades of the Great War.
4. The Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers.


[An Executive Committee was appointed]

It was decided that it be a recommendation to the Executive Committee to frame their scheme and inscription as commemorative of those who have served in the war as well as those who have lost their lives in it.

It was decided that the suggestions received from Lady Wantage, Brigadier General J T Wigan, Alderman Cox, Lt Col Walsh and others as to the form which the memorial should take be referred to the Executive Commmittee for their consideration.

The question of the desirability of limiting the amount of individual subscriptions was considered but no resolution upon the subject was passed.

Berkshire War Memorial Committee minutes (R/D134/3/1)