Westminster Chimes in the Tower or a Calvary or Crucifix in the Churchyard?

Newbury began to consider its war memorial.

A Meeting of Parishioners was held at the Parish Room on January 22nd to consider the question of a War Memorial to the memory of those fallen in the War. There was a fair attendance, though more might have been there. Various suggestions were brought forward and considerable discussion took place. Finally, it was decided to consider the putting of a Memorial of some kind in the Church to contain the names of the men; the putting of the Westminster Chimes in the Tower; and the erection of a Calvary or Crucifix in the Churchyard. For this a Committee was appointed, consisting of the following: the Rector and Churchwardens, The Mayor, Mr C Hawker, Mr G W Roberts, Mr D Geater, The Mayoress, Mrs L R Majendie, Mrs H E Pratt, Miss Godding, Miss Plows, Miss K Harrison, Miss L H Barnes, amd Miss P Belcher, with power to add to their number.

Newbury parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

Advertisements

Reading School’s contribution to the war

A complete listing of Reading School’s alumni who had served in the war.

OLD BOYS SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES.

This list has been compiled from information received up to December 14th, 1918; corrections and additions will be welcomed and should be addressed to: – R. Newport, Esq., Reading School, Reading.

Allnatt, Rifleman N.R. — London Rifle Brigade.
(killed in Action).
Ambrose, 2nd Lieut. L.C. — S.L.I.
Anderson, Pte. L.G. — Can. Exp. Force
Appelbee, 2nd Lieut. T. — 13TH West Yorks.
(Killed in Action).
Atkinson, Lieut. E.G. — Indian Army
Atkinson, Capt. G.P. — 6TH Royal North Lancs.
Atkinson, 2nd Lieut. J.C. — R.A.F.
Aust, 2nd Lieut. H.E. — Yorkshire Regt.
(Twice Wounded).
(Killed in Action).
Aveline, Lieut. A.P. — Royal Berks Regt,
(Wounded).
(Military Cross).
Baker, 2nd Lieut. A.C.S. — R.G.A.
Baker, Rifleman A.E. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Rifleman R.S. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Lieut. T.H. — 8TH Royal Berks Regt.
(Wounded)
Balding, Capt. C.D. — Indian Army.
Banks, Pte. W.R. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Bardsley, Capt. R.C — Manchester Regt.
(Wounded).
Barnard, F.P. —
Barroby, Trooper. F. — Strathcona Horse.
Barry, Capt. L.E. — R.A.F.
Baseden, Lieut. E. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Baseden, 2nd Lieut. M.W. — R.A.F.
Batchelor, Lieut. A.S. — Duke of Cornwall’s L.I.
Bateman, Capt. W.V. — Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Bayley, 2nd Lieut. F. — Chinese Labour Battalion.
Beckingsale, Pte. R.S. — Canadian Contingent.
Beckingsale, Capt. R.T. — Tank Corps (Military Cross).
(Wounded).

Belsten, E.K. — R.A.F.
Biddulph, 2nd Lieut. R.H.H. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Died of Wounds).
Bidmead, Pte. — Wilts regt.
Black, Pte. F. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Blazey, A.E.H. — R.A.F.
Blazey, 2nd Lieut. J.W. — Royal Berks Regt
(killed in Action).
Bleck, Lieut. W.E. — R.F.A.
Bliss, 2nd Lieut. A.J. — Leinster Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Bliss, Pte. W. — 2ND Batt.Hon.Art.Coy. (more…)

Numbers so low, and sickness so rife

Influenza was taking its toll, and many schools would miss out on celebrating the armistice as a result.

Sonning
4th November 1918

On Monday 4th November only 22 boys presented themselves at school. I informed the Correspondent (Rev G.S Crawford) and he communicated with the B.E.C. The Secretary of the B.E.C acting on the advice of the school Medical Officer advised the closing of the school until Nov 18th.

Braywick
4th November 1918

School re-assembled as usual this morning but as the numbers were so low, and sickness so rife Dr Patterson ordered the school to close for a week longer.

Upton
4. XI.18

Henry Roberts and Francis Webb had their marks cancelled during the morning as they appeared to be suffering from influenza.

Milton
Nov 4th

I, Alice Andrews, take up my duties here as Head Mistress.
Owing to Influenza only 30 children assembled – sent for the Rector who advised me to wire to Reading – dismissed children to await instructions.

Boyne Hill
Nov: 4th

School reopened at 9 am with 172 present out of 201. The MOH has been notified.
The building has been thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.
Children have again been dismissed until Nov: 11th.

Log books of Sonning Boys school (89/SCH/1/2); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); Upton CE School (C/EL48/2); Milton CE School (D/P85/25/25); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3);

News of Newbury men

More Newbury men joined the forces.

O.N’s in His Majesty’s Forces.
List No. 12.
Additional Names.

ALDERSON, Cadet C. B., R.A.F.
CHURCH, Pte. A. E., Artists’ Rifles.
GAUNTLETT, H., R.N.
GIBSON, Gunner J. M., R.G.A.
HURRELL, Cadet J.J. O.C.B
KENDRICK, 2nd A. M., P.A., R.N.A.S.
MICHELL, Lance-Corpl. C., Royal Warwick Regiment.
NEW, Cadet G. H., R.A.F.
NEWMAN, Gunner, 1/1st Wessex Heavy Battery.
PLUMB, T.
STRADLING, Cadet A. W. G., R.A.F.
SUMMERS, Cadet S., R.A.F.
WALTER, J.

Promotions.

BLAND, Cadet, W. H., to be 2nd Lieut., R.A.F.
CHURCH, 2nd Lieut. E. H., R.A.F., to be Lieutenant.
DAVIDSON, Corpl. I. C., Worcester Regiment, to be Sergeant.
HUDSON, 2nd Lieut. N. A., Leicester Regiment, to Lt. Adjt.
PARKER, Cadet G. L., to be Probationary 2nd Lieut., R.A.F.
PLENTY, Capt. E. P., R.A.F., to be Major.
ROBERTS, Pte. E. E., Civil Service Rifles, to be Lce.-Corpl.
ROSLING, Capt. D. W., The King’s Liverpool Regiment, to be Major.
TANNER, Cadet, W. J. V., to be 2nd Lieut., Royal Berkshire Regiment, attached Royal Warwick Regiment.
WEBB, Lieut. O. S., M.C., R.E., to be Captain.
YALDEN, Sergt. E. C., 7th Middlesex Regiment, to be 2nd Lieut., 7th Middlesex Regiment.

Honours.- Croix de Guerre.

BURGESS, Lieut. N .G., R.N.R.

Mentioned in Despatches.

ALLEE, Capt. J., A.S.C.
HALL, Lieut. G. W., R.G.A.

Reported Killed, Now Wounded and Prisoner of War.

MICHELL, Lnce.-Corpl. C., Royal Warwick Regiment

Wounded.

BROWN, Lieut. A. B. V., 3/17th London Regiment.
DAVIDSON, Sergt. I. C., Worcester Regiment.
FUNNELL, Pte. F., 10th Royal Fusiliers.
SANDBACH, Sergt. A. L., 2nd South African Horse.

Lost at Sea.

BURGESS, Lieut. N. G., Croix de Guerre, R.N.R.

Accidentally Killed.

COWELL-TOWNSHEND, Lieut. R., R.A.F.

Killed in Action.

HALLEN, Corpl. J V. 1st Surrey Rifles.
MORTIMER, Pte F. C., 4th North Staffordshire Regiment.

The Newburian (magazine of St Bartholomew’s School, Newbury), July 1918 (N/D161/1/8)

Starving and orphan children walked, some from Jerusalem and others 200 miles, to obtain food and shelter from the British

A missionary organisation was helping care for child refugees in British-occupied Palestine.

WORK OF THE CHURCH IN THE WAR ZONE

A Lawn Meeting was held at the Rectory on June 6th, when a most interesting account was given of the work of the Church in the Mohammedan Land of Palestine.

Miss Roberts told of how the Church Missionary Society were asked to re-open their Hospitals at Gaza, of the starving and orphan children who had walked, some from Jerusalem and others 200 miles, to obtain food and shelter. She exhibited samples of the lace work done by these children and others, and was ready to receive orders.

She showed how the Military Authorities were relying for such help upon the Church Missionary Society, and the danger of having numbers of orphans to maintain without the provision of funds. A voluntary collection was made, producing £2 6s 6d. This included a cheque from a lady who could not attend.

Sulhamstead parish magaizine, August 1918 (D/EX725/4)

Added to the prayer list

More Earley men were serving.

List of men serving in his Majesty’s forces

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:-

John Bowden, Frederick Llott, Richard Polden, George Anderson, Alfred Parsons, Lawrence Parsons, Hugh Parsons, Cuthbert Parsons, Leonard Streak, Albert Fostekew, Stanley Tanner, George Roberts, Henry Attwood, Thomas Cloke.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:-

Sick: Harold Ballard. Killed: Ernest Shears.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, March 1918 (D/P191/28A/25)

Fit to take wounded cases from overseas

The Managing Committee of Newbury District Hospital were pleased that had won their case to continue to take wounded soldiers rather than mere convalescents – but they feared their rivals in Reading were hogging all the most challenging cases.

Thursday July 12th 1917

Letters from Colonel Russel dated the 6th and 9th inst. Were read, and the Hon. Sec. reported that prior to the receipt of the latter letter he had seen the Consulting Surgeon of the Southern Command who had been over the Hospital with him and had expressed himself pleased in all respects and quite satisfied that it was fit to take wounded cases from Overseas as distinguished from Convalescent cases, and had promised to see that the Hospital received its quota of such cases through Reading.

Resolved that no further attempt be made to question the decision of the Authorities as regards affiliation to Reading and that every effort be made to insure that the Hospital does in fact receive from Reading its fair quota of wounded cases as promised, and not convalescent cases.

Resolved further that Messrs Peake, Graham Roberts, and Howard Savill be appointed to act with the Chairman as a small committee to suggest a scheme for working under the new arrangement, including any desirable re-arrangement or apportionment of the Clerical and similar duties involved, and the relief of the Matron from such duties as far as may be practicable.

Newbury District Hospital minute book (D/H4/3/2)

A church in a hut, and quite a parish!

An army chaplain from Newbury writes on his work:

The Rev. H C Roberts writes to the Rector from the Front as follows:

“I was very pleased to get your letter and to hear some of the Newbury news. It was forwarded on to me, as I have moved on from my last station, and am now at Garrison Mess, APOS 19. It doesn’t convey much, does it? This is a very much bigger place than where I was last, and I am in charge of this part. We have a very nice church in a hut all fitted out with an altar, reading desk, etc. I believe it is about the only one of its kind out here – it holds about 170 men, and at the voluntary evening service it gets quite full. We have two early services on Sundays, 6.15 and 7.15, and an evening communion on the last Sunday of the month. More men we find are able to make their communions in the evening owing to work, so it gives them the opportunity. Here too we have a CEMS Meeting one night in the week, and last time we had about 15 present. Of course work varies very much according to district, etc. In that way this is very much better than my last place. In addition we have various parade services on Sunday too. So you see it is quite a parish!! and, as you may imagine, a pretty big one too…

We are having some very hot weeks again (this was written in July, ED) now, but for one or two nights it turned quite cold. I am sorry I can’t tell you much of the place or work, but of course we are allowed to say very little in our letters, and all mention of places, kind of work, visits, etc, is prohibited, and I can imagine quite rightly.”

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, September 1917 (D/P89/28A/13)

“He feels it to be his duty to volunteer”

Two church workers from Newbury were headed to the front.

The Rev. H C Roberts has been accepted as a temporary Army Chaplain, and by this time will be in France. He will be much missed in the church for his thoughtful and direct sermons, and in the Day and Sunday Schools for his real power of teaching and interesting the children. We wish he could have been here longer with us, but he feels it to be his duty to volunteer, and we congratulate him on being so promptly accepted by the Authorities. We wish him every blessing and success in his new work, and a safe return home.

Mr G F Pyke has been called up, and is a severe loss to the CLB, which he Captained so well, and to the Boys’ School.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P89/28A/13)

“Confident that he would return safely, but God saw otherwise”

Two Newbury clergymen volunteered to serve as army chaplains, while soldiers from the town were reported killed. Another man returned disabled.

The Director General of National Service has entrusted the Archbishops and Bishops with the task of finding out what the clergy can undertake in this direction, and the Rural Dean of Newbury a short time ago held a meeting of clergy to discuss it.

The Rev. H C Roberts has felt it to be his duty to volunteer for a Military Chaplaincy, and his name has been sent up to the Chaplain General of the forces. We congratulate Mr Roberts upon his patriotic action, though we shall very much miss him in the parish if he is accepted; and we hope it may be possible for him to return to Newbury when the war is over. It will interest the parishioners to hear that the name of the Rev. A H D Newbold has also been sent up by his Rural Dean for a Military Chaplaincy. When Mr Roberts leaves us, there may have to be some alteration in the services of the church.

We offer our sincere sympathy to Mrs Albert Nailor on the death of her husband in action, and to the wife and father and mother of Richard Smith, also killed in action. He is another of our old choir boys who has laid down his life for his country. He had been home on leave, and had returned to the front full of his usual good spirits, quite confident that he would return safely, but God saw otherwise. We are glad to have Albert Hill back in Newbury with his honourable loss, and we hope that, when he is fitted out, he will be able to return to his former occupation.

Let us redouble our prayers on behalf of our nation’s cause, and for all those who are fighting for her by sea or land or air. This is our best war service.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P89/28A/13)

Greater love hath no man than this

Caversham men’s service was honoured.

ANOTHER DISTINCTION FOR CAVERSHAM.

Hearty congratulations to 2nd Lieut. A.F.C. Hill, upon receiving the Military Cross for gallant conduct with the Salonika Expeditions. This is the fourth Military Cross awarded to Caversham men, the other recipients being the Rev. C.W.O. Jenkyn, Army Chaplain; 2nd Lieut. D.T. Cowan, A. and S. Highlanders; and Sergt.-Major Wilfred Lee, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.

Lieut. E.J. Churchill, R.E., has been “mentioned in dispatches.”

Sergt. E. Canning, of 1/4TH Royal Berks, is one of the two non-commissioned officers selected out of his battalion for the honour of a Commission.

Caversham roll of honour.

“Greater love hath no man than this that a man lay down his life for his friend”

Name, Ship or Regiment and address, Date of death
(more…)

Parcels for prisoners

New restrictions made it harder to support PoWs in Germany.

ASCOT PARISH Prisoners of War Fund

On account of the new regulations in regard to the despatch of parcels to British Prisoners of War, it has become necessary to close this Fund. Happily, up to the present only two Ascot men have been taken prisoners, both of whom belong to the Berkshire Regiment. This Regiment has entirely adopted them, though arrangements have been also made whereby the parents in each case are still able to send parcels to their sons in their own name, through the Regimental Fund. With the consent of the subscribers to our fund, the balance in hand, £3 2s. 4d., has been sent to the Berkshire Regiment Prisoners of War Relief Fund, in acknowledgement of their generous treatment of our two Ascot lads. Our thanks are due to the kind donors and subscribers to this Fund during the past year.

THE CHRISTMAS SALE, in aid of the two “Ascot Beds” (French and Serbian Womens’ Hospitals) will be held at the South Ascot Parish Hall on Wednesday, December 6th. The Sale will be opened at 2.30p.m. by Countess Roberts.

Christmas Tree. Bran Pies. Admission, 2.30-5.30p.m., 6d. After 5.30, admission free. Tea, 6d.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1916 (D/P151/28A/12)

“The precautions now being taken at Newbury are doubtless spreading consternation among our enemies”

St Nicolas’ Church in Newbury was insured against potential air raid damage.

Unusual darkness having been imposed upon us, on account of the danger of Zeppelins, the time of evensong at the Parish Church has been altered to 5.30, but we hope that this will make no difference to the attendance at the Service: the parishioners will also have the opportunity of spending a longer Sunday evening at home, an opportunity not to be despised. Our readers will be glad to know that the Churchwardens, with their usual forethought, have specially insured the Church against the danger of aerial attack, this insurance involving the additional expenditure of £34. Dark blinds are being made for the Parish Room, so that the usual evening meetings, etc, may be held there, and we hope to be spared the attention of the Police. The precautions now being taken at Newbury are doubtless spreading consternation among our enemies.

We desire to offer our sincerest sympathy to the Rev. H C Roberts, who has lost a brother at the War, and also to Mrs Walter Lawrence on the death of her husband, and to his mother and relations. Sergeant Major Lawrence had done a great deal in Newbury for the Volunteer movement, and letters received by his widow from officers with whom he had served bring out his splendid soldierly qualities, keen patriotism, and unfailing cheerfulness: greatly though we regret his loss, we are truly thankful for examples such as his.

The Rev. F Streatfeild is returning home from the Front for a well-earned week’s rest.

Newbury parish magazine, March 1916 (D/P89/28A/13)

Special prayers for the war

At St Peter’s Church in Earley, worshippers prayed for the war dead, and those still serving.

Commemoration of the Dead.

We are having a special service on Monday evening, November 1st, at Evensong in commemoration of those who have died in the war and all the faithful departed, and on Tuesday, November 2nd (All Souls’ Day) a special Celebration of Holy Communion with special intention for all the faithful departed. Any members of the congregation who would like their departed friends mentioned by name are requested to send the names to one of the Clergy before Tuesday morning.

List of Men Serving in His Majesty’s Forces.

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:-

Ralph Hunter, Harold Matson, Albert Callow, Fred Bulpit, Colin Matson, Albert King, Tom Goodard, John Barnes, Jack Newey.

The following we especially commend to your prayers:-

Wounded – Osmund Matson, Arthur Worsfold (gas poisoning), John Chandler, Eric Cook, William O’Leary, Reginald Waite, Stanley Platt.

Killed in Action – Herbert Roberts, Rex Lewin, Bert Farmer, Herbert Mileam, George Wright.

With the sanction of the Bishop we are finishing Evensong on Sundays at the 3rd Collect and having special intercessions and prayers for the war. Each Sunday we read the names of wounded, sick, missing, prisoners and killed, and on the 2nd Sunday in each month the whole list of those who are serving. We hope all parents and friends will come and pray for their beloved ones.

Of course we are still continuing the Special Celebrations on Tuesdays at 7 when the full list of names is read; and the Intercession Services on Tuesday at 8pm.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, November 1915 (D/P191/28A/22)

“Every additional sand-bag may mean the preservation of a soldier’s life”

As Newbury men fell at the Front, the town’s women were trying to save lives by making sandbags.

The War has been lately still further brought home to us by the casualties which have occurred among our old lads. We should like to express our sincerest sympathy with the parents of those who have been killed or wounded, or reported missing, among the latter being Sydney Isaac Hughes, Joseph Alfred Hopson, and Harry Brice Biddis; and especially with Mr Gregory and his family on the death of his only son, William George, one of our old choir-boys, who was killed at that terrible scene of war, the Dardanelles. Willie Gregory was one of our best choir-boys, and was a young man of much promise, and we now hold his memory in special honour for his noble death of self-sacrifice. It has been truly said that ‘the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the Church’, and those who die today in the sacred cause of truth and justice, are adding strength and glory to the Church to which they belong, and are giving fresh incentive to us to lead a true Christian life.

A special War Intercession Service for men has been organised by Mr Rupert Adey, and has been held on Monday nights in the Parish Room. It is possible that this will be combined with the Men’s Bible Class, which starts again on the first Monday in October.

A Committee has been formed for the purpose of providing additional sand-bags for our troops. The committee consists of Mrs A Camp, Mrs H Cooke, Mrs C A Hawker, Nrs G W Roberts, with Miss Boldero as Treasurer, and Mrs L R Majendie in the chair. A large number of bags have been cut out by Mr H Godding, and these can be obtained at the Parish Room on Tuesday mornings from 11 to 12, beginning with Tuesday, October 5th, and Thursday evenings, from 7 to 8, beginning with Thursday, October 7th. We hope that many people will come and take the bags home to sew up, instruction as to which will be obtainable at the Parish Room: and the Treasurer will be very glad to receive subscriptions towards the cost of the material, which is between six and seven pounds. Every additional sand-bag may mean the preservation of a soldier’s life.

Newbury parish magazine, October 1915 (D/P89/28A/13)