More difficult work

Burghfield would commemorate the war dead by offering opportunities to the living.

The War Memorial Committee

On October 17th they adopted a report by the “Sports” Sub-committee, recommending that £10 be spent on levelling and improving a pitch in the old triangular recreation ground at the Hatch; and an estimated sum of £68 upon similar but much more difficult work on the new Recreation Ground by Holiday House…. The £10 voted for the school children’s games (see Oct. Magazine) has been paid over to Mr Sheppard, to be expended as may be agreed by the Head Teachers of the several Schools.

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1919 (D/EX725/4)

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Beautiful glass representing St George

The Earley war memorial porch plans were altered to save money.

Memorial Porch Committee Meeting

There was a good attendance on October 16. Present: The Chairman, Mr Churchwarden Brown and Mr FB East (hon. Treasurers), Messrs. W B Waters, H B Mole, W Lawrence, A H Salman, H Masters, H Knapman, J A Murray, G C T Carter, F C Edwards, E Clayton Jones, E Long; Ladies – Mrs Newbery, Miss Goose, Miss Lawrence, Miss Driscoll, Miss G Fanstone.

The meeting was occupied with many matters of importance for an hour and a half. It was decided by a majority of votes that a resolution to line the porch with stone to be rescinded on the grounds of expense, and that the walls be plastered. It was agreed that the question of slate or stone material for the slab upon which the names be inscribed be left to the judgement of the architect; and the committee confirm their previous resolution that all parishioners should have the right to place names of their sons who died on this tablet; they felt, however, that it was not desirable that this should be done in cases where the names were associated with a memorial in another church, without special reason. The chairman produced some figures supplied by the builder which are of general interest:-

Estimated cost of Porch £559 13s 0d
Less nett cost of stone lining £20 18s 0d
£538 15s 0d

Add cost of figure in niche, also slate or stone tablet with names cut, amount uncertain, Architect’s commission of 10% on above amount

£53 17s 6d
£592 12s 6d

At the close of the meeting the treasurers made the following statement

Subscriptions paid or promised, as already announced in October Magazine

£482 0s 2d
Less unredeemed promises £2 1s 6d
£479 18s 8d

Collection at dedication festival £39 11s 0d
New subscriptions Oct 16 £11 5s 5d
£530 15s 1d

The next meeting of the committee was fixed for Nov 20 at 7.30pm

The work is now growing rapidly, and it is interesting to watch the plan of dovetailing the new work into the old wall of the present building. To do this the old north doorway had to be lowered to meet the timbered ceiling of the porch, a new arch has also been turned on the inside and the door cut down correspondingly. Thus the new doors and doorway will be considerably lower. Adjoining this doorway, about three feet eastward, will be a small door leading to the stairs to the chamber over the porch. The stairway is cut partly in the thickness of the wall and abuts in part on the floor of the porch, being concealed by brick walls. For this purpose one of two lights has been removed and there remains one single window just east of the stairs doorway. This light will be filled with beautiful glass painted by Mr Bewsey, representing S George. It is a gift from Mr B H Butler in memory of his son Benjamin James Butler whose ship was torpedoed in the Mediterranean. The glass is finished and ready for fixing. The ceiling of the porch will be built of rebated oak joists with oak panels to ceiling covered with deal floor (above) and a layer of felt between. The chamber above will thus be impervious to sound and draught. It has been decided to plaster the walls of the interior; and not as stated last month to line the porch with stone; the expense, £20 18s, seemed not justified by the advantage.


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, November 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Accidentally killed at Archangel

A Burghfield mechanic was killed abroad.

NAVAL OR MILTARY NOTES

We regret to record that Mr and Mrs Green, of Mill Cottage, have received a telegram informing them that on 4th September their son, Albert L Green, 2nd A/M, RAF, was accidentally killed at Archangel. He was only just 20, and was one of our Brightwell apprentices.

Burghfield parish magazine,October 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Never completed on account of the War

Roadside memorials required permission from the council.

MAIDENHEAD: CRAUFURD RAILWAY ARCH

The Committee have received a report with reference to the widening and improving the Craufurd railway arch on the main road between Maidenhead and Marlow.

An agreement was arrived at between the County Council and the Maidenhead Town Council, in 1914, whereby the Council agreed to pay one half of the then estimated cost.

It appears that the arrangements for a grant from the Road Board were never completed on account of the War. Having regard to the increase in the estimated cost of the work, the Committee cannot recommend the Council to contribute thereto.

The Committee recommend, however, that caution posts be erected at the bridge approaches.

WAR MEMORIALS

Maidenhead.

Application has been received from Maidenhead Town Council for the erection of a War Memorial on the Bath road (High Street), Maidenhead.

The Committee recommend that no objection be raised – provided that certain suggestions as to the surface of the roadway are carried out, and that no expense is thrown on the County Council.

Arborfield Green.

An application has also been received from Mr John Simonds for permission to erect a War Memorial opposite the pond at Arborfield Cross.

The Committee recommend that no objection be raised to the proposition.


Highways and Bridges Committee report to Berkshire County Council, 11 October 1919 (C/CL/C1/1/22)

The cost of the memorial will be just about covered

Burghfield wanted to echo the war graves abroad in its parish memorial.

The War Memorial Committee has held two meetings in October. On October 10th they adopted a report by the “Cross” Sub-committee recommending that Messrs G Maile & Sons’ tender should be accepted for the erection of a facsimile, 10 ft 6 ins high, of the Cross designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield, RA (for use in military cemeteries abroad). The price of the Cross itself will be £175. The cost of the foundation, erection and lettering cannot yet be stated, but will just about be covered by the sum available. The foundation will be put in at once, and the Cross be erected in the spring.

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1919 (D/EX725/4)

There should be some sort of Peace Memorial

There were mixed views in Wargrave as to how to commemorate the war.

October
Peace Memorial

The Parish has summoned a Parish Meeting for Friday, October 10th, which will be held 7.15 p.m. in the Woodclyffe Hall.

It is felt that this would be a suitable occasion for raising the question of a Peace Memorial in the Parish.

I. – There is a very general feeling that there should be some memorial in the Parish Church, in memory of those who fell and to record the names of those whose lives were freely jeopardised for the glory of God. Such a memorial has been already dedicated in the East Window, as a tribute from an individual donor, and it will be completed by a Chancel Screen with the names carved on the panels. But there are those who would like to have a share in raising a General Memorial, which would remain as a tribute from the parish as a whole. With this view the East End of the South Aisle was specially reserved by a Resolution of the Vestry. Sir Charles Nicholson has prepared a scheme of decoration, for this which will be submitted to the meeting on Friday, Oct. 10th. It provides for a screen, in continuation of the proposed Chancery Screen, and for the panelling of the walls. A lectern might be added with a large volume, after the fashion of an old chained bible, in which the names might be engrossed and biographical particulars added. We should thus have a Place of Memorial.

No scheme of embellishment can give to any part of the church the least dignity and sanctity without making it a place of Communion, because the whole plan in the building and decorating of our churches is to lead the worshippers to the altar, as that to which everything else is subordinated. In our Peace Memorial there is unfortunately no space for an altar. But the East Window of the chancel itself is a memorial to the fallen and all who approach the choir to enter the sanctuary will see the names on the chancel screen.

II. – there are also those who feel that there should be some sort of Peace Memorial outside the church. If so it would seem that this should be either a monument to commemorate the services rendered or an institution to benefit the families of those who served and their children after them.

There may be many suggestions made when the opportunity of the public meeting gives occasion and, if so, the widest possible range is to be encouraged. We want all the suggestions which commend themselves to the different views and tastes of parishioners. It will be easy to refer such proposals to a committee, who shall report to a subsequent meeting, if such a course is thought to be advisable.

It is therefore to be hoped that the meeting will be very largely attended.

The actual purpose for which the meeting is summoned is to decide about a German Gun.

The War Office has sent a 77 m/m Field Gun and Carriage to the Parish Council to be kept in the parish as a public trophy of the great victory and as an acknowledgement of the V.C. which adorns the Wargrave Roll of Honour.

It has been presented to the Parish Council that there is some difference of opinion as to how the gift should be dealt with. The Parish Council has therefore summoned a Public Meeting of the Parishioners to decide the matter.

November
The Parish Meeting

Three matters were brought before the Parish Meeting, which was summoned by the Parish Council on Friday, October 10th, at the Woodclyffe Hall. The Peace Memorial, a German Gun presented by the Trophies Committee of the War Office, and a new Burial Ground.

There were very diverse subjects, but in each case it was felt that the matter should be put to the widest possible vote, and when the prospect arose of a largely attended meeting it seemed best to take the opportunity of bringing them all forward on the same night.

The Peace Memorial

The Vicar, as chairman of the Parish Council, presided. He introduced the subject by explaining that there was no notice of any particular Resolution before the meeting, but it would seem that a Peace Memorial should either take the form of some sort of monument to commemorate the fallen, or some sort of institution to benefit those who had served in the Great War or their dependents.

A memorial to the fallen might be either inside the Church or outside. A memorial was already secured inside the Church in the East Window and Chancel Screen given by Sir William and Lady Cain. The names of the fallen would be carved on the panels of the screen. But this was an individual gift and several people had expressed a wish to add something more, as a memorial by public subscription. Any such proposal having to do with the fabric of the Parish Church must be submitted to a “Vestry Meeting”.

A Vestry Meeting had decided that the East End of the South Aisle should be reserved as a Place of Memorial and the walls had therefore been left free from individual tablets. The consulting architect, Sir Charles Nicholson, had considered that if this proposal was eventually adopted the best [plan would be to erect a screen, in harmony with the Chancel Screen, and to panel the walls in oak. It would be possible to preserve a record of the names of all who had served, together with biographical particulars of the fallen, in a book, after the fashion of a chained bible, on a Lectern inside the screen. Sir Charles Nicholson’s sketch design was exhibited in the Hall.

After some discussion it was proposed that a Committee be appointed to consider the best form of Peace Memorial outside the Church and to report. The following gentlemen were elected on the Committee with power to add to their number:- Messrs. R. Sharp, H. A. Hunt, T. H. Barley, F. Headington, A. B. Booth, W. Sansom, J. Richardson, J. Hodge, Major Howard Jones, Col. C. Nicholl, Major K. Nicholl, and Dr. McCrea.

Another Parish Meeting will be summoned in due course to receive the report of this Committee.

It is no doubt a good thing to leave the question of any Memorial inside the Church to a Vestry Meeting. A Vestry is an equally public Meeting, but it is summoned by the Vicar and Churchwardens and is technically qualified to apply to the Chancellor of the Diocese for het legal ‘faculty,’ which gives permission to proceed with the work. A Parish Meeting summoned by the Parish Council is not thus qualified and could only make a recommendation to a Vestry.

The German Gun

The next question was that of the German Gun. A resolution asking the Parish Council to accept the trophy was lost by a considerable majority.


Wargrave parish magazine, October and November 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Commemorate God’s mercy to us, and the valour of our gallant dead

War Memorial Chapel

May I remind all Collectors that they should take their cards for initialling, together with any money they have collected, to Miss Apthorp, OBE, at Stanlow, High Town Road, on Monday, October 6th.

Miss Apthorp will be at home to receive them from 10 am till 1 pm, and again from 6 pm to 8 pm. If any Collector is ill, will she please send a card to Miss Apthorp, and she will call for the money. I hope to publish a list of subscriptions to date in the November Magazine. As Treasurer, I have already received a good many subscriptions, and one legacy of £100, and a promise of a beautiful oak Altar for the new Chapel from the Sawyer family, through Miss A E Sawyer. The Altar would be in memory of the Rev. W G Sawyer, formerly Vicar of this Parish.

In connection with this, I may say that while the oak panels will be kept exclusively for the Fallen in the War, the other ornaments of the Chapel can commemorate other past worshippers in St Luke’s…

We have thus made an excellent start, but we have still a long way to go in the next 11 months, if,as we all hope, we are worthily to commemorate God’s mercy to us, and the valour of our gallant dead.

PS – We still want a few more Collectors. Will any volunteers (ladies or Gentlemen) please apply to the Hon. Sec. Miss Apthorp, or to the Hon. Treasurer, the Vicar.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

“The familiar hymns were never better sung or seemed more full of meaning”

Warfield unveiled its war memorial – a simple, tasteful stone tablet inside the church.

September

The unveiling of the Memorial in the Parish Church, will take place at the evening 6.30 service, on Sunday, September 28th, the eve of Michaelmas Day.

November

The Service of Dedication of the War Memorial on Sunday evening, September 28th, will live long in the memory of those who took part in it.

The Church was full, and the familiar hymns were never better sung or seemed more full of meaning.

The Memorial, so well executed by Mr. Murphy, is very beautiful in its extreme simplicity.

A perfectly plain white marble slab, with the words “Roll of Honour” at the top and beneath “in Grateful and lasting Memory of the Men of Warfield who fell in the Great War, 1914-1919.”

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September and November 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/9, 11)

A wish to place wreaths or a few flowers by our wayside Crucifix on the anniversaries of the day when their relatives or friends died for our Country

People wanted to remember their loved ones who had fallen in the war.

St. Agnes’, Spital

Many people have expressed a wish to place wreaths or a few flowers by our wayside Crucifix on the anniversaries of the day when their relatives or friends died for our Country, and the question is often asked whether this may be done. It may indeed most certainly be done, and it is earnestly hoped that all who wish to thus perpetuate the memory of those who are dear to them will do so at any time as well as on the anniversaries, and will ask for prayer for his soul at the Holy Eucharist on the day that he died.

Clewer parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)

War memorial cross

War Memorial Cross
The “Cross” sub-committee met on 22nd September at Hillfields, and agreed unanimously upon a recommendation to the full committee, who will meet on 10th October at 6.30, at the Jubilee Room to consider it, and also a report from the “Sports” sub-committee, which will be ready by then. Any suggestions for suitable inscriptions should be sent either to Mr Lousley or Mr Willink.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1919 (D/EX725/4)

“I want it to be in every way worthy of the greatness of the men’s sacrifice “

The Vicar’s Letter

Dear Friends and Parishioners, …

I venture to appeal that our special effort for a War Memorial Chapel may not hurt our ordinary parochial funds, especially the Free Will Offering Fund. Unless we pay for our ordinary work in the Parish, our gifts to the War Memorial Chapel are not real thankofferings, but only a pretence. May I appeal for wider support for the Free Will Offering Fund (Assistant Clergy Stiepnds) …
Then I do beg of all who can to support the War Memorial Chapel we hope to build. I want it to be in every way worthy of the greatness of the men’s sacrifice and of the honour of being a part of the House of God…

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar, C E M Fry.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

A memorial cross to be erected in the churchyard

16th September 1919
The vicar read prayers this morning and afterwards appealed to the boys to assist in contributing towards a memorial cross to be erected in the churchyard.

Log book of Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School (C/EL72/3, p. 214)

Medals commemorating ‘peace’ and a portrait of Nurse Cavell

Edith Cavell was a British nurse based in Belgium, who heled a number of British and other soldiers to escape and was shot dead by the German occupying force. She is remembered for her words, “Patriotism is not enough. I must have no hatred or bitterness towards anyone.”

Wallingford Boys Council School
1919, 15 September

A portrait of Nurse Cavell, purchased by the boys, hung in the hall today.

Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School
15th September 1919

The whole of the boys attended the Town Hall this morning to receive medals commemorating ‘peace’.

Log books of Wallingford Boys Council School log book (SCH22/8/3, p. 76); and Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School (C/EL72/3, p. 214)

The time is approaching when the names will be wanted

Burghfield was finalising its list of names for the war memorial.

The War

Private Joseph West, of Trash Green (late Rifle Brigade), has just been mentioned in dispatches. He was wounded at Neuve Chapelle in March, 1915, and was discharged about a year later. Congratulations to him on his belated honour.

Mr Willink hopes that any Burghfield men who has received any mark of distinction not already announced in this magazine will communicate with him.

He hopes also that relatives of Burghfield men who have lost their lives on service in the war will take the trouble of studying the Roll of Honour in the inner Church Porch, and also the List of the Fallen which rests against the screen inside the church near the lectern, and that they will notify him of any omissions or mis-statements which should be attended to. The time is approaching when the names will be wanted for inscription upon the cross to be erected in the churchyard.

Burghfield parish magazine, September 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A want long felt

Clewer had decided on a recreation ground for its memorial.

The Parish War Memorial

The following circular has been issued by the Memorial Committee, and will be distributed amongst the subscribers:-

Dear Sir or Madam,

The Committee are glad to be able to announce that they have acquired a piece of land about six acres in extent in a very central part of the parish, for the purpose of a Recreation Ground – a want that has long been felt. The sum of £422 17s. 10d. has already been subscribed and some £250 more is necessary to complete the purchase, laying out and fencing. It is earnestly hoped that those who have not already supported the Fund will kindly contribute now and so share in providing a permanent War Memorial to the gallant men of the parish who have laid down their lives for King and Country.

Yours faithfully,

Clewer parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)