Lovely procession

The Bisham war memorial was dedicated.

18 June 1919

Memorial service in church, then processed through village to Cross for dedication. Bishop [of] Buckingham came. Most lovely.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

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“It was decided to place a Memorial on the wall”

There was progress towards a Newbury war memorial.

The War Memorial Committee came to the Church on June 18th at 2.30, to meet Mr C O Skilbeck, who came down from London to advise them, on behalf of the Oxford Diocesan Advisory Committee. It was decided to place a Memorial on the wall just near the Lady Chapel, and Mr Skilbeck gave the Committee the name of an architect who would draw up a design. As soon as this is settled upon, an appeal for funds will be made. To provide this Memorial, and to put the Westminster Chimes upon the Bells, may involve an expenditure of £200 or £250.

Newbury parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

The war will not, strictly speaking, have “terminated”, until the peace terms have been duly ratified

The war had still not technically ended, as the treaties had not been signed. But peace celebrations were in full swing.

Peace Celebrations

At a second General Meeting, on 17th June, the recommendation of the Committee that these celebrations should take the form of a Tea, with games, etc, for the children of the parish, was approved. “Children” to include all ages up to 14, and any still attending school over that age. By the time this magazine appears it is hoped that the German Representatives will have signed the Peace Terms. But Austria, Turkey, and Bulgaria remain to be dealt with, and moreover the war will not, strictly speaking, have “terminated”, until the terms have been duly ratified by the proper representative assemblies. No doubt, however, an official Peace Celebration Day will be proclaimed before this has taken place in all the countries concerned.

Meanwhile, as announced at the Meeting, the Military Authorities are arranging central functions for those who have served overseas, and there will be a gathering and entertainment in Reading.

War Memorial

At the same Meeting, further recommendations of the Committee were adopted, viz:

(a) The erection of a Cross in the Churchyard in memory of those who have fallen;

(b) The improvement of the Parish Recreation Grounds, in connection with a Sports Club to be formed.

It was referred to the Committee to raise two separate funds for these two objects (Peace Celebrations and War Memorial), the latter fund to be applied first to the Cross, and secondly to Recreation Grounds, etc.

Burghfield parish magazine, July 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A stormy meeting

Opinion in Bisham was divided over the parish’s war memorial.

16 June 1919

Meeting in evening at schools about war memorial in church. Rather stormy.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Wireless messages concerning the armistice coming from an agitated operator at the Eiffel Tower, before many in authority knew what was being said

St Augustine’s was the only children’s home for boys run by the Community of St John Baptist. Many of its inmates went on to serve in the Armed Forces, and they shared their experiences with the Sisters.

June, 1919
Dear Friends of St Augustine’s Home

The health of the boys has been excellent this winter, for which we are most thankful. We had a bad epidemic of influenza a year ago, and when the disease made its re-appearance in Windsor in the beginning of winter, we trembled, but schools were closed, and we resorted to gargling and house-spraying, and had not more than half a dozen cases at most.

Our always kind doctor and dentist have returned home from war work, and again look after our boys…

We ended our financial year with bills amounting to more than £200 unpaid. We are printing not merely our last balance sheet, but a pre-war one, by way of an interesting and instructive comparison. One thing that may strike you is that not merely are our expenses heavier, but our subscriptions are considerably less. There have been so many claims on everyone, but we hope that as these lessen, the claims of a Home like ours, which has sent many sons to the front and is helping to train others to take the place of those who have fallen, may appeal not merely to former subscribers but to those who will become new friends…

Our household linen cupboard, and our clothes cupboard, were almost empty this spring… Then … came a large package of garments, cutlery and other things from a war hospital… during the last two weeks of March.

A number of kind friends at Eton and other places made a special Lent effort and sent us a nice contribution of stockings… If other friends would follow this example (perhaps some of those who have knitted so assiduously for soldiers) and ask their friends to do the same, the stocking basket would wear a more cheerful aspect…

August will soon be here, and we hope to see some of our old boys down for the holidays, though Peace celebrations may very naturally take them elsewhere. They have come and gone from time to time as leave allowed, and many thrilling things some of them have to tell – though told always in the simplest, most matter-of-fact way. Some have been in ships torpedoed, one received and transmitted wireless messages concerning the armistice coming from an agitated operator at the Eiffel Tower, before many in authority knew what was being said. And some of our boys will of course never return, but have won the “great promotion” of which the Home is so proud.

Yours very gratefully
The Sister-in-Charge

Letter to Friends of St Augustine’s Home, Clewer (D/EX1675/23/4/6)

Gratitude for deliverance from the German menace

The War Memorial

The committee met on June 13.

Present: The vicar, the Rev. H B Mead, the two churchwardens, Messrs F B East, W B Waters, H Masters, E Long, G C Sturgess, H B Mole, E Clayton Jones, A H Salman, J A Murray, H Knapman, T R Stevens, F C Edwards, G C Love. Ladies: D A Lawrence, G Fanstone, E Type, N Driscoll, A L Martin, H L Stevens, S Goose, B Newbery. The appointment of Mr Richard Brown and Mr Frank B East as joint treasurers of the fund met with approbation. The newly elected treasurers proceeded to receive the first payments, and a first and most gratifying instalment, in cash and promises, the amount of £407 8s 1d was returned. It was resolved to ask the builder to proceed with the work with as little delay as possible. The committee adjourned to Friday 18 July.

This glorious start, recorded above, may rightly call for a word in these pages. There are hundreds of people round about the church who may like to have a share in this Memorial; and the generosity of the first givers will, we hope, move them to follow their example. As we may have said before, we do not want to beg anyone to give to our memorial porch; we only desire to ask them to decide whether or not they will show their gratitude for deliverance from the German menace in this way. Those who have given, and those who mean to give, know that a considerable sum must be yet obtained if the architect’s fee and builders expenses are to be met. We have a large and determined committee, and they may be relied upon to bring the matter under the notice of the parishioners and worshippers of the church. Outside these there are but a few that can be approached; the amount must be raised amongst ourselves, and we are confident that it will be raised.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Designs of the proposed Cross

A Committee Meeting of the War Memorial Fund was held on the 13th of June, when Mr. C. Seymour was appointed Secretary and Treasurer, and he and the Duke of Newcastle and the Vicar were chosen to meet Mr. Nutt in the Churchyard and discuss with him designs of the proposed Cross.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/7)

“We are truly sorry to lose from our midst one from whom we expected much in coming days”

After all the dangers of war it was illness which felled one returning soldier.

CONDOLENCE

We much regret to have to record the death of Mr Frank W. Snell of 22 Eldon Road. Our friend had not long been demobilised. He was on active service for a considerable time in France, and was seriously wounded in the head and face. There can be no doubt whatever that the brief illness to which he succumbed was due to this cause. We are truly sorry to lose from our midst one from whom we expected much in coming days, and we tender our sincerest sympathy to his parents, and the other members of his family, in their sore bereavement.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, June 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

From telegraph pole to war memorial

The Cookham Dean war memorial was on its way.

The Vicar’s Letter

There has been no meeting of the War Memorial Committee since April 26th. I understand that a few corrections have been made in the list circulated last month, and also a few names have been sent in; these, of course, though it is impossible to say more at present, will receive the sympathetic consideration of the Committee, whose decision in the matter will be final. The Post Office authorities have consented to the transfer of the telegraph pole that at present stands upon the site where the Memorial is to be placed, and it will be moved to its new position in the course of a few days.

Cookham Dean parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P43B/28A/11)

“We want to have on the Memorial the names of all the old boys who received their education in Speenhamland School, and who made the great sacrifice in the War”

Plans were afoot for another memorial.

The School War Memorial, which is being generously given by Mrs Waldron, has taken a forward step in the past few days. The architect has paid a visit to the Schools, and we hope very soon to see the proposed design. We want to have on the Memorial the names of all the old boys who received their education in Speenhamland School, and who made the great sacrifice in the War. Names should be sent in to Mr Herring at once. He would like full name, rank, and regiment or ship.

Speenhamland parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P116B/28A/2)

Still more to come

June 5th

My list of old scholars who have died during the War numbers 38, and there are still more to come.

St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

Gratitude for being saved from overwhelming peril

Earley churchgoers gave generously towards the war memorial.

The Vicar has received two munificent gifts of £100 and £50 towards the expense of the porch of remembrance of those who from this parish went out and laid down their lives in the war. The gifts in both cases are anonymous, and one of the donors expressed a hope that the parishioners would give liberally and be thankful for the opportunity of shewing their gratitude for being saved from overwhelming peril. With such a lead it is not too much to expect an outpouring of offerings from all whose hearts are touched with thankfulness, and that the work may immediately be put in hand.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

The number of old boys who died for their country is now 34

June 3rd

The number of old boys who died for their country is now 34. I have advertised in NW News, and have had many answers.

St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

A memorial to which it is thought that all, whatever their religious opinions, would be glad to subscribe

Clewer planned on two war memorials – one in the church, and one for everyone.

Clewer War Memorials

As our readers are aware there are to be two Memorials to commemorate those of our fellow parishioners who gave their lives for their King and Country in the Great War which by the Blessing of God has been crowned with victory after more than four years of stupendous effort and heroic endurance on the part of the Allies. To commemorate this glorious consummation and the debt we owe to those in this Parish who made the supreme sacrifice in order to achieve it and as a thank offering to Almighty God it was decided more than a year ago in a Vestry Meeting, to restore the Side Chapel in the Parish Church, commonly known as the Brocas Chantry, by placing an altar there and using it for the purpose of the Daily Eucharist. This has long since been accomplished, but as yet it has not been decided what form the Special Memorial shall take. The best way of recording the names of the fallen, which is an essential part of the scheme is not so easy a matter to decide as some may think, especially in an old church like ours. Brass tablets for the inscription of the names, of which we have too many specimens already, are out of keeping with the architecture of the church, and we are strongly urged by the Diocesan authorities to avoid them as a distinct disfigurement to an ancient church. They advise as an alternative that the names be inscribed on a parchment scroll, or in a book which could be kept in the church as a permanent record of our local heroes. For this purpose a beautifully bound book has been presented by the Hon. A. P. Henderson, as previously announced. As soon as the lists are completed and arranged in alphabetical order they will be transcribed, and the book will record in one portion the names of the fallen and in the other the names of the survivors. The architect whom we are employing, Mr. Howard of Oxford, has suggested some further improvements for the renovation of the Chapel which may in time be carried out when sufficient funds have been obtained. At present we have about £70 in hand. So far with regard to the Religious Memorial.

In addition to this a secular and more public memorial has been suggested, which is to take the form of a public Recreation Ground, and to which it is thought that all, whatever their religious opinions, would be glad to subscribe. Towards this purpose some £450 has already been contributed and negotiations are being carried on for the purchase of a suitable piece of ground. Certainly a recreation ground would be a valuable asset to the parish, and would tend to the physical and moral well-being of our young people, who often get into mischief from not having sufficient scope for the legitimate exercise of their physical energies. We commend both the memorials and especially the former to the favourable considerations of our readers.

Clewer parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)

Death at Aden

A tragic death on the way home.

CONDOLENCE

We were all much grieved to hear of the sad loss which our old friend, Mrs Hussey of 32 Northumberland Avenue, had sustained in the death of her son at Aden, when on his way home after service abroad in the army.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, May 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)