“It is difficult to obtain a complete list of those parishioners or worshippers in our church who died in the War”

Would this be the final list of names for the St Bartholomew’s war memorial?

As it has been said before, it is difficult to obtain a complete list of those parishioners or worshippers in our church who died in the War and whose names will be inscribed on the wall of the memorial porch. We shall be glad to corrections or additions to the list printed here:-

Edward Fisher Septimus James Hawkes
William J KItchin Gilbert Barber
Henry Kitchin Harold Cole
George Bond Bert David
Ralph Pusey Henry William David
Albert Ernest Gibbs Alfred Gilbert Allen
Clifford Salman Ernest John Hallett
William David Stevens W T Martin
Francis Harry Stevens George Strudley
Ronald Eric Brown H G Huggins
John William Allen A H Martin
Leonard Noble Love F E Wickens
William Love E E Baggs
Charles Love Ernest Thomas Baul
Richard Frederick Crockford Charles Henry Hunt
James Benjamin Butler Thomas William Bew
John Andrew Ritson George William Goddard
Frank Edgar Hewitt Edwin Harry Goddard
Frederick Richard Stieber Percy George Franklin
Leonard Streake Sidney Hartwell
John O’Callaghan Arthur George Harris
Frank Gosling H G Davis
Edward Osbourne Stanley Richard Flower
Charles James Bird Percy William Lemm
Albert Povey* Ernest Thomas Wicks
Frank Washbourne Earley A H Pace

*We are unable to trace the address of this name

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, November 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

The Peace Dinner is a success

An entertainment was offered to Wargrave’s ex-servicemen.

August
The Peace Dinner

It is proposed to entertain to dinner on Saturday August 2nd, all the men of Wargrave who have served their Country in His Majesty’s uniform during the war.

The dinner will be in the Woodclyffe Hall and will be followed by a Smoking Concert.


September
The Peace Dinner

A Dinner was held in the Woodclyffe Hall on Saturday, August 2nd, to which all the men of Wargrave, who had served their Country in His Majesty’s Uniform during the war, were invited. There were more than two hundred guests and the evening passed very happily. Fortunately the weather was fine, so that it was possible to get an extra table out of doors and people could pass in and out in comfort. Mr. Henry Bond presided. The usual toasts were honoured. Sir James Remnant and Major Howard Jones, D.S.O., responded for the guests.

The dinner was followed by an exceedingly good smoking concert for which Mr. A. Booth was entirely responsible. A large number of people had worked hard to make the evening a success and they were amply rewarded.

Wargrave parish magazines, August and September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Impossible to hold a Public Holiday without some form of public entertainment

Sports took centre stage at the Wargrave peace celebrations.

The Peace Holiday

July 19th, 1919, was proclaimed as the Peace Holiday with very short notice for the necessary arrangements. The first suggestion was that Wargrave Regatta should be held on that day, but after very careful going into the matter the Amusements Sub-Committee reported that it was impossible. The Committee therefore abandoned the attempt and fixed August 9th for the Regatta.

It was, however clearly impossible to hold a Public Holiday without some form of public entertainment, but there was no time to summon a public meeting to discuss what should be done. So it was suggested that there should be a Tea and Sports for everyone and it was ultimately decided that the Recreation Ground would be the most suitable place. It was understood that upon such an occasion all parishioners would like to have an opportunity to contribute, so it was decided that a circular letter should be issued, inviting subscriptions, and that a box for contributions should be set at the gate; but it was necessary to enter upon the expenditure at once, if arrangements were to be made in time, so Sir William Cain and Mr Henry Bond very kindly acted as guarantors.

All arrangements were made by the Committees, which enrolled about seventy-five people, all of whom worked hard for the success of the day.

The Sports Committee was fortunate in having Captain Lindemere as Secretary and the whole of the Cricket Club Committee kindly joined forces with them.

Mr. P. H. Stringer was elected Master of Ceremonies for the Sports with the task of arranging the order of events. This was not an easy matter, because there was no opportunity to make out a time-table beforehand and the events had to be so arranged as to leave the outer course free when the rope was let down at tea time. But all difficulties were overcome and the programme went with a swing from start to finish. All the competitors ran well (including the PIG), no obstacle proved insuperable, and those who did not win the first prizes will have another opportunity at the Victory Flower Show, on Wednesday, September 3rd.

The Wargrave Lads’ Club gave a very good gymnastic display which was most appreciated by everyone.

The weather was not all that could be desired, but it might have been very much worse and the rain in the morning was a warning to everyone to come prepared for heavy showers. At all events there were some bright intervals and some quite long periods without rain.

The Children

There must be a special paragraph for the children, because they have a special place in everyone’s thoughts when there is a Public Holiday on an historic occasion and we want them to remember it in after years.

There is no doubt they had a first rate time on July 19th. The day began with a parade at the Piggott School when every child was presented with a half-crown and a bag of chocolates from Sir William and Lady Cain. These were presented by Miss Cain and every coin was fresh from the mint dated with 1919.

Then there were races at the Recreation Ground, where Major Kenneth Nicholl and others kindly worked off some forty heats to relieve the programme for the afternoon.

The fun began again at half-past one, in spite of the rain, with special treats for children under seven. A Ladies’ Committee had taken entire charge of these infants and provided all sorts of pleasures ending up with a Bran Pie and a present for every one.

Then came tea, and afterwards a victory medal for each child presented by Mr. Bond. And all the afternoon there were the sports to watch, and a wonderfully caparisoned steed to ride, led by an oriental gentleman beautifully attired and a hurdy gurdy which played whenever the Band was at rest, and dancing in the tent to finish the day, altogether a very happy time.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Peace Day Celebrations were duly held at Crazies Hill on July 19th, and many appear to have thoroughly enjoyed the day, in spite of the inclemency of the weather. Over three hundred people, old and young, were entertained to dinner and tea. A Cricket match, Married Versus Single, resulted in a close victory for the Single eleven. Then followed sports, for which there were many entries, and a tug-of-war. In the evening, a firework display brought to a close a memorable occasion.

The congratulations of all are due to the Committee on having organised a most successful day’s proceedings, which will long be remembered by those who took part in the festivities.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

A superb investment

The country was still paying for the war.

Hare Hatch Notes: The Victory Loan

The object of the loan is to place our Country’s finance on a firm foundation. It has a claim hardly less imperious that that of any loan in the last four years. Even the small investor has his chance, by purchasing a war savings certificate, which costs the holder 15/-. H. C. Bond, Esq., generously adds 6d. to each certificate up to 25. In ten years time 26/- is paid for the 15/6 certificate. This is a superb investment. By means of the coupons small sums can be paid weekly as well as larger sums. We strongly advise our readers to save their money and invest it in war savings certificates. Mr. Chenery will gladly give any information that may be desired.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Pigs scattered over Wargrave, Knowl Hill and Crazies Hill

When food was in increasingly short supply, some turned to keeping pigs.

The Wargrave Pig Club

The Annual Meeting was held on the 13th February. The Report and Balance Sheet were presented showing a balance on hand on 31st December last of £31 2s. 4d. The following is a copy of the Report:-

“The Wargrave Pig Club was formed at a meeting held in the Parish Room on 4th April, 1918, when the Officers and Committee for the year were elected. The membership has reached a total of 79, and at one time there were 290 pigs registered on the Club books.

The Parish Council gave permission for two rooms in the old District School buildings to be used as a store, and arrangements were made for members to attend there on Friday evenings to purchase pig food. The food has been procured by certificates issued by the Livestock Commissioner, and although there has sometimes been difficulty in getting the necessary quantity from the millers owing to the general shortage, there was only one week when millers’ offals were unobtainable. That however did not mean that the pigs were without food altogether, for, thanks to Mr. Bond generously advancing money with which to buy other kinds of pig food in large quantities, the Club had a good supply of unrationed pig meal in store, and the Committee were enabled to “carry on”. Altogether over 36 tons of feeding stuffs have been dealt with.

Mr. Bond has had erected at his own expense six capital sites on the Station Road Allotment ground which he has agreed to let to members of the Club at the low rent of 5s. a year. Five of these sites have been occupied. He also advanced money with which to purchase young pigs. 33 pigs have been so bought and resold to members at the actual cost price.

Sir William Cain provided the sum of £6 for prizes for the best bacon hog. Mr. A.B. Booth £3 3s., for porkers, and Mr. Bond £3 as extra prizes. Mr. Rose and Mr. A’Bear acted as judges, all the pigs being viewed in their own sites. The prizes were distributed at a meeting of the Club members on 3rd December.

The competing pigs being scattered over Wargrave, Knowl Hill and Crazies Hill, it occupied the judges the whole of one day for inspection. The Committee offer them their sincerest thanks for undertaking this work.

One of the objects of the Club is the insurance of pigs and although 27 members paid premiums, the Club only had one claim to settle.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Fireworks and thanksgiving to God for the victory of the Allied Cause

Crazies Hill Notes

Thanksgiving services were held on the day of the signing of the Armistice, and on the following Sunday, when a large congregation gathered in the Mission Hall to offer praise and thanksgiving to God for the victory of the Allied Cause.

On Saturday, Nov 16th, the scholars of Crazies Hill School assembled in the Hall for Tea by the kindness of Mr. Bond, who generously provided the refreshments. Afterwards Mr. Chenery showed us a varied selection of interesting and amusing lantern slides, which were greatly appreciated by all.

We desire to record our grateful thanks to all who kindly helped to provide a most enjoyable evening for the children.

Many availed themselves of the opportunity offered by Sir William Cain to witness an excellent firework display at the Manor.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

A very narrow escape

There was news of the fate of several men from Burghfield.

THE WAR

Honours and Promotions

Temporary Captain G H B Chance, MGC, to be Assistant Instructor, graded for pay at Hythe rate.

Casualties

Captain R P Bullivant, MC (1st County of London Yeomanry), killed in action, in Palestine; 2nd Lt A Searies (Suffolk Regiment), severely wounded; Albert Bond (13th Royal Fusiliers), wounded last April; L Clarke (2/4th Royal Berks), wounded; Eric G Lamperd (London Regiment), prisoner; F J Maunder (Devon Regiment), wounded; Lance Corporal Percy Watts (Royal Berks Regiment), wounded; Lance Corporal Alfred West (Inniskilling Fusiliers), prisoner.

No details have yet been received about the lamented death of Captain Ritchie Bullivant, of which the whole parish will have heard with regret. It is hoped to give some fuller notice in a future magazine. Meanwhile his brother may be assured of general sympathy.

It is to be deplored that gallant Alfred Searies should have been seriously wounded, gunshot wounds in face and hand. He has, however, been able to be removed to hospital at Wimereux, so his mother may hope for the best. He had been doing duty for some time as acting captain; and we hear that he had also been recommended for the Military Cross, so he had been distinguishing himself before receiving his third wound.

2nd Lt G D Lake, ASC, MT, has lately had a very narrow escape from a shell bursting close to him and killing and injuring several men. We hope to see him safe and sound home for his approaching marriage, which is to take place (if he gets his expected “leave”) about mid-November.

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1918 (D/EX725/4)

“After four years of war we ought to do what we could to make up to the little people for the many ordinary pleasures of childhood which they had necessarily missed”

The Armistice was greeted with joy and celebration in Wargrave.

Victory

The news that the Armistice was signed reached the Wargrave Post Office at almost 11.20 a.m. on Monday November 11th. The Foreman of the Belfry was ready to summon his Ringers and in a very few minutes the bells of the Parish Church rang joyously. The houses were soon bedecked with flags, the village street became full of people and the wounded soldiers marched in procession with noise and merriment. At noon there was a short service for the few who could assemble, but at 7 p.m. there was a general Service of Thanksgiving to Almighty God and the Parish Church was crowded.

The Authorities have permission for the arrangement of public festivities with bonfires and fireworks to be held within one week only of Armistice day. It seemed right to do all that could be done to impress the event upon the memories of the children, and it was felt that after four years of war we ought to do what we could to make up to the little people for the many ordinary pleasures of childhood which they had necessarily missed. But there was no time to call a public meeting to discuss the matter because the only chance of securing provisions was to make the purchases at once. By the hospitality and spirit of Sir William Cain and Mr. Bond the general entertainment of the whole village was happily arranged.

Mr. and Mrs. Bond entertained all the young people under the ages of 18 to tea. The infants met in their own school and were afterwards taken to join the older children in the Piggott School for a magic lantern entertainment. The Boys’ Club, the Girls’ Club, and the other young people had their tea in the District School. The Crazies Hill Children were well provided for in the Mission Hall and Mr. Chenery showed them a good exhibition of lantern slides.

There were many kind helpers and a good many visitors to the tea parties. At each place of entertainment there were a few words spoken to help impress the memories of the young people with the greatness of the occasion and our cause for thankfulness. Mr. Bond, Mr. Huggins, and the Vicar all said something at one place or another, and everywhere there were loud cheers for the host and hostess. It was delightful to see the enjoyment of the children.

The Fireworks were announced to commence at 8 p.m., at the Manor, and the entertainment was for all parishioners. It was a most magnificent display with many set pieces, a host of rockets and a bonfire at the last. The show was arranged at the top of the park just below the garden terrace. A great crowd of people thronged the lawns and overflowed to the grass beyond.

At the conclusion of the fireworks, when the people were gathered to the bonfire, the Vicar, supported by Mr. Bond, expressed the thanks of the parish to Sir William and Lady Cain. Everyone understood that when both time and supply were so limited there could have been no entertainment at all unless someone had acted at once. Sir William Cain has always shown that he has the welfare of Wargrave in mind and on this occasion he acted immediately, taking the whole burden upon himself and supplying an entertainment which no combined effort could have surpassed. The cheers of the guests must have done something to show how much the hospitality was appreciated, and it would indeed be difficult to think of anything that could have been devised that would have been more calculated to impress the memories of the young people with the glorious event of this happy victory than the entertainment which they enjoyed at Wargrave.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

It is a constant source of anxiety to know if our funds will hold out til the end of the War

The people of Wargrave contributed to help for Berkshire PoWs, including sending them bread to supplement what the Germans provided.

Prisoners of War of the Royal Berkshire Regiment

It is one of the first duties laid upon us to provide for the prisoners of War of our county regiment.

A Committee, of which Rear-Admiral Cherry is Hon. Treasurer and Mrs. Mount of Wasing Place, is Hon. Secretary, has undertaken this work. In February last it was realised by the Committee that to look after the prisoners of all the seven battalions now at the front would be more than they could undertake. It was therefore decided that this committee should only deal with the 1st, 2nd, 5th, and 8th battalions – the prisoners of the 1/4, 2/4 and 7th battalions were handed over to Mrs. Hedges, 19, Castle Street, Wallingford, and the prisoners of the 6th battalion to Mrs. Dowell, 155 Malden Road, Colchester.

An appeal was sent to the Parish of Wargrave for support and Mrs. Henry Bond undertook to collect subscriptions for the fund. Mrs. Bond’s appeal has met with a ready and generous support- the amount collected by her in the parish was £101. 2s., in sums of £5 and under.

In acknowledging the cheque Mrs. Mount writes:

Wasing Place,
Reading,
August 21st.
Dear Mrs. Bond,

I really do not know how to express to you my thanks for the splendid collection you have made in Wargrave for the Royal Berks Regt. Prisoners. It is a constant source of anxiety to know if our funds will hold out til the end of the War. Our bread bill alone amounts to between £60 and £70 a month, besides which we have to find adopters for our 280 prisoners willing to pay each £21 per year for these prisoners.

Your splendid collection will go far towards removing any immediate anxiety.

Yours sincerely,
Hilda Mount.


Wargrave parish magazine, September 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

A call for economical but wholesome recipes

The vicar of Wargrave was at the heart of the village’s flourishing War Savings Association, and also efforts to encourage food to be produced locally. The March issue of the parish magazine announced:

War Savings and War Rations

A meeting of the Wargrave War Savings Association will be held on Saturday, March 10th at 7 .p.m., in the Iron Church Building. All Parishioners are most cordially invited to attend. The subject of War Rations will also be discussed.

The total sum paid into the Secretary’s hands up to February 26th, amounts to £1014 9s. 6d., which has been extended in the purchase of 726 Certificates value £1 five years hence; 21 value £12 five years hence: and 13 value £25 five years hence.

Bonus

There is no doubt that the Chairman’s kind gift of one sixpenny coupon on every Certificate up to ten has proved a strong inducement to save that number. And he is so pleased with the response that he has most generously determined to extend his offer up to 25 Certificates for each person.

Vicarage Office Hours

On Saturdays 9.30-10.30 .a.m. and 5.30-6.30 .p.m. the Parish Room is open for War Savings Business.

Certificates due members may then be obtained, and Certificates may be purchased.

During the days of the War Loan the Vicar was glad to welcome War Savings business on any day and at any time when he was at home, but he must now ask members to be more particular in the observance of Office Hours.

Money may be sent to the Vicar if accompanied with a clear statement of Certificates required, full names and sufficient postal address.

The meeting duly took place:

War Savings Association

A very well attended Meeting was held on Saturday, March 10th, in the Iron Church Building. Mr. Bond presided and gave an address on Food Production and War Rations.

A Committee was appointed for Food Production of which Mrs. Bulkeley is Chairman, supported by Mrs. Hinton, Miss. Rhodes, and Messrs. Butcher, Chenery, Crisp and Pope.

A good deal of work has already been done in organising parties to dig, and in providing allotments and seed potatoes for those who want them.

A Committee was also appointed for Food Economy in charge of Mrs. Winter, supported by Mrs. Bennett, Mrs. Cain, Mrs. Chenery, and Mrs. Hermon.

It is hoped that the committee may give much help in disseminating information and enlisting support. Mrs. Winter will be very grateful for any economical recipes which have proved wholesome and successful. These recipes will be exhibited in the Parish Room.

Wargrave parish magazine, March and April 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

“Should the Choir Boys take up the matter seriously the War may end sooner than we think”

Two East Berkshire villages publicised their new War Savings Associations.

Crazies Hill Notes

As regards the War Savings Association Mrs. Gladdy has most kindly consented to be what is officially called “The Collector”. That is any member having a Card can purchase stamps from Mrs. Gladdy at her shop in the village. The stamps are called “Coupons.” The Cards are divided into squares for 31 Coupons. 30 Coupons together with Mr. Bond’s bonus of 6d. entitles the member to a 15/6 War Certificate – the benefits of which are well known to most of us by now.

A certain patriotic gentleman in the neighbourhood has promised to place the first stamp on the card of any Choir Boy (from Crazies Hill Choir) who wishes to become a member.

Should the Choir Boys take up the matter seriously the War may end sooner than we think.

Hare Hatch Notes

For those who desire to help their Country by paying into the War Savings Association, Cards and Coupons can be obtained any Monday evening 6.30 p.m., Hare Hatch Mission Room “in the Vestry.”

Coupons only can be had on application at Kiln Green Post Office any day during office hours.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

“Everyone can help to win the war by lending money to the Government”

The people of Wargrave were impressed by the call to help the war effort by placing their personal savings in a Government scheme.

War Savings Association

The Wargrave War Savings Association was very successfully started at a well attended Public Meeting on Tuesday, January 9th, 1917.

Mr. Henry Bond presided, and was supported by Mr. W. C. F. Anderson, Hon. Secretary for Berks, Mr. G. G. Phillimore, who is Secretary for a local branch, and the Vicar.

The Speakers explained that everyone can help to win the war by lending money to the Government. The Government gives 5 per cent, interest, so everyone can help himself at the same time as he helps the country. The man who saves now is helping our soldiers by going without something himself. The less we consume from over the seas, the more room we leave in the ships to carry necessities and comforts for our soldiers.

A resolution to form a Wargrave War Savings Association was unanimously passed.

Mr. Henry Bond was unanimously elected Chairman and Hon. Treasurer. The Vicar was elected Hon. Secretary.

The following were elected to the Committee of Management, with power to add to their number.

Wargrave: Mrs. Groves, Messrs. H. Butcher, W.H. Easterling, F.W. Headington, and E. Stokes.
Hare Hatch: Mrs. Oliver Young, Messrs. A. E. Chenery and A.E. Huggins.
Crazies Hill: Messrs. J.T. Griffin and T. Moore, the Rev. W.G. Smylie.

The Office of the Association is at the Vicarage. The Certificate if affiliation to the National War Savings Committee, the Rules and Statements of Accounts will be exhibited in the Parish Room.

Office Hours at Vicarage, SATURDAYS 9.30- 10.30 a.m. and 5.30-6.30 p.m.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

A Military Hospital for mentally-affected German prisoners

There was more on the idea of using Broadmoor for insane PoWs.

2 September 1916
The Board of Control
66 Victoria Street, SW

My dear Simpson

With reference to the memorandum which I left with you on Thursday evening respecting the proposed use of a wing of Bmoor as a Military Hospital for mentally-affected German prisoners, it occurs to me that the Council of Supervision may think we are not showing them proper consultation if we allow the project to approach final settlement without consulting them officially. If you agree I would suggest that a communications should go to them from the Home Office. The War Office will probably approach you soon on the question of the financial and administrative arrangements to be made for running the Block as a Military Hospital: we have told them that the Home Office is the supreme authority over Bmoor….

As you know the Visiting Committee of County and Borough Asylums which have become War Hospitals continue to carry on the general work of administration of their Institutions under the supervision of Dr Marriott Cooke & Dr Bond. These Commissioners would of course be willing, if asked, to render any services desired of them in connection with Broadmoor.

Yours sincerely
W P Byrne

Broadmoor correspondence file (D/H14/A6/2/51)

Accommodation for insane German prisoners of War

Some prisoners of war were mentally unwell. It was suggested that perhaps they could be housed at Broadmoor.

Report of a visit by Dr Bond on 14th August 1916 to Broadmoor Asylum with the object of judging whether certain vacant accommodation is suitable for the use of insane German prisoners of War.

Under a provisional arrangement made between Sir William Byrne and Sir Edward Troup, & at the request of the Director General of the Army Medical Service, I, on the 14th inst, paid a visit to Broadmoor Asylum, where I called upon Dr John Baker & inspected a disused block of the Institution.

The block in question has been unoccupied for the last 2 years, but, generally speaking, is in good condition & available for immediate use…

While situated within the boundary wall of the Institution, it can nevertheless easily be provided with a separate entrance from the road by making a doorway in the wall at the spot marked D on the plan [not in the file].

DESCRIPTION OF THE BLOCK.

The block comprises 3 storeys. On the ground floor are 16 single rooms for patients, 2 attendants’ rooms, a scullery, bath-room, and a small sanitary spur. All these rooms are repeated on the first and second floors; but on each of these 2 floors are 2 day rooms… Each floor is provided with an alternative exit in case of fire.

There is thus accommodation in the block for 48 patients…

OBSCURING OF WINDOWS.

The window panes in the lower sashes of windows in the corridors and day rooms would have to be obscured if it is desired to prevent the inmates of the block from seeing the patients in other divisions….

Dr Baker is very short of attendants for the wards & would be quite unable to find staff for the block, but thinks he would be able to loan 2 experienced & trained men, one to act as charge attendant & the other to act as deputy charge attendant of the block, provided 2 inexperienced men were given him in lieu. It would thus be necessary for the War Office to supply whatever number of orderlies is required.

SUGGESTED NAME OF PROPOSED HOSPITAL.

It is suggested that if the block in question be handed over to the War Office the name & address of the new hospital should be either: Crowthorne Military Hospital, Crowthorne, Berks, or in the event of “Crowthorne” being already the name of a local hospital used for sick & wounded soldiers, Owlsmoor Military Hospital, Crowthorne, Berks….

SUGGESTIONS RELATING TO THE STAFF THAT WOULD BE REQUIRED

That Dr Baker & Dr Foulerton each receive a commission in the RAMC.

That two or three of the present more experienced attendants should be made non-commissioned officers & given the responsible positions in the block; & that orderlies to the necessary number be supplied by the War Office….

C Hubert Bond
Commissioner of the Board of Control

Broadmoor correspondence file (D/H14/A6/2/51)

A masque for Serbian relief

An enterprising drama teacher put on a performance in aid of our suffering Serbian allies. To get an idea of the evening, here is the script of The Masque of the Two Strangers.

THE TOWN HALL, READING

MISS MARY HAY, A.L.A.M. ELOCUTION, ASSISTED BY HER PUPILS, Has much pleasure in announcing Two Dramatic Recitals of the “Masque of the Two Strangers” (by kind permission of Lady Alix Egerton), And Scenes found on incidents in Dante’s “Vita Nuova”, On Wednesday, October 20th, 1915 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m., IN AID OF THE SERBIAN RELIEF FUND,
And under the distinguished patronage of

The Lord-Lieutenant of Berkshire and Mrs Benyon,
His Worship the Mayor of Reading
His Excellency Monsieur Creddo Miyatovich (Serbian Minister)
Mr. Henry Ainley
Lady Armstrong
The Rev. and Mrs Beloe
Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Benson
Mr. Acton Bond
The Principal of University College, Reading and Mrs. Childs
Mr. John L. Child
The Ven. Archdeacon of Berkshire and Mrs. Ducat
Mr. and Mrs. C. I. Evans
Mrs. Downing Fullerton
Countess Gurowska
Viscountess Hambleden
Miss Holmes
Miss Knighton
The Misses Lacy
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Mackenzie
Lady Makins
Mrs. W. A. Mount
Mrs. Murdoch
Miss Musson
Mrs. G. W. Palmer
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Palmer
Miss Prebble
Mr. and Mrs. Rannie
Lord and Lady Reading
Mr. F. G. T. Rowecroft
The Rev. Gore Skipwith and Mrs. Skipwith
Mr. W. Stewart
Mrs. Tyser
Lady Wantage
Mrs. Waring
Miss White
Mrs. Leslie Wilson.

Doors open at 2.30 and 7.30 P.M.

Tickets: Afternoon Sofa Stalls, 4- Reserved Seats, 3/- Admission 2/-
Evening Sofa Stalls, 3/- Reserved Seats, 2/- Admission 1/-
Special Terms to Schools.

Box Office : – Attwells, Binfield & Co., 162 & 163 Friar Street, Reading. Telephone No. 11 .

Programme for recitals at Town Hall in Aid of Serbian Relief Fund, 1915 (D/EX1734/1)