A sale of effects at the Military Hospital

War hospitals were closing.

Tuesday, the 10th day of June, 1919

HOUSE COMMITTEE

SALE AT BASINGSTOKE MILITARY HOSPITAL

The Master reported that there would shortly be a sale of effects at the Military Hospital at Basingstoke, and on the proposition of the Rev. A H Caldicott, seconded by the Rev. Sir J Key it was resolved:

That the Master and Matron be authorised to attend the sale and purchase any articles which they might deem expedient.

JUNIOR ASSISTANT NURSE

The Master reported that he had received a personal application for the post of Junior Assistant Nurse from Gertrude Roff of Sandford, Oxon. The Master explained that Mrs Roff desired a post in this district, so as to be near her husband, who was a patient in the Ashurst Military Hospital, and on the proposition of the Rev. A H Caldicott, seconded by Mr Hunt it was resolved:

That it be a recommendation to the Board:

That Mrs G Roff be appointed Junior Assistant Nurse at a salary of £20 per annum, plus an allowance of £4 per annum for uniform, with War Bonus at current rates, and that the appointment be for one month on probation.

REPORT OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE

On the proposition of the Rev. A H Caldicott, seconded by Mr A D Wells it was resolved:

That the appointment of Gertrude Roff to the post of Junior Assistant Nurse for one month on probation be confirmed.

Minutes of Wallingford Board of Guardians (G/W1/36)

Advertisements

Abnormal conditions

Wallingford Board of Guardians was reluctant to go along with pay rises for all.

Tuesday, the 20th May 1919

WAR BONUSES

Your Committee went very carefully into the question of War Bonuses which ought to be allotted to the Officials of this Board.

A letter from the Local Government Board was read stating that in accordance with an award of the Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Government Employees dated the 31st day of March, 1919, the Treasury have recently authorised for permanent Civil Servants a new scale of War Bonus, and Dr Addison suggests that Local Authorities might think it well to take this new permanent scale for guidance for fixing or amending War Bonuses for their Employees. It was pointed out in the letter that the Award does not extend to Officers receiving rations, but that in the case of rationed Officers of Local Authorities payments might be made at a lower rate to meet the special circumstances of the case. This letter pointed out that in the case of any difference arising between the Local Authorities and their Officers, the matter in dispute should be submitted to the Chief Independent Commissioners Dept, Ministry of Labour.

A further letter was read from the Conciliation Council for Poor Law Services, which was signed by Mr Herbert Davey, secretary of the Poor Law Unions Association, and Mr John Simons, Secretary, Poor Law Officers Association, which embodied the following resolution. – This Council recommends all Boards of Guardians who have not already done so, to obtain a scale of War Bonuses authorised by the Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Civil Servants, in full for non-resident whole time Officers, and 50 per cent of such scale for resident Officers.
The scales in question, as far as they relate to this Board, are 24/- per week for non-resident permanent Officers plus the equivalent of 10 per cent of their ordinary remuneration, and for resident and rationed Officers, men 12/- per week plus 20 per cent of their ordinary remuneration, and £20 a year for women plus 10 per cent of their ordinary remuneration…

Your Committee very carefully considered in all its bearings the question of increases, and having regard to the observations contained in the Local Government Board circular letter and … it seems there is no course open to this Board but to accept these Awards, and they therefore advise their acceptance, but the Committee wish the Board clearly to understand that the scales in question have been fixed for them and they adopt them with considerable reluctance.

The Committee also wish to draw attention to the last paragraph of the letter of the LGB which states that the increases hereby awarded are to be regarded as temporary increases intended to assist in meeting the increased cost of living owing to the War and to be recognised as due to and dependent on the existence of the abnormal conditions now prevailing.

Report of the General Purposes Committee, in minutes of Wallingford Board of Guardians (G/W1/36)

A war bonus of 20% on prewar salaries

The porter at Windsor Workhouse had had his job kept open for him.

Windsor
14th January, 1919

Letter from Mr W J Wood, Porter (now on active service) read with reference to Demobilisation and his return to duty.

The Clerk reported that he had informed Mr Wood that the Guardians had by resolution decided to keep his post open for him.

Resolved that no action be taken with regard to the Temporary Officer until the date of Mr W J Wood’s return is known.

Faringdon
14th January 1919

War Bonuses

Letter from Clerk to Guardians Wallingford. His Board has adopted a scale without waiting to call the proposed conference.

It was resolved to determine the question of the bonuses to be allotted to outdoor Officers in this Union independently.

It was accordingly resolved that a war bonus of 20% on prewar salaries should be granted to all the outdoor Officers to date from the 1st October 1918.

Windsor Board of Guardians minutes (G/WI1/26); Faringdon Board of Guardians minutes (G/F1/44)

In reference to the handing over of the Ex-Kaiser for trial

Feeling against the enemy leadership still ran high, even as people adjusted to peace.

23rd December 1918

The following letters were read and ordered to be filed for future reference:-

1. From the Local Government Board
(1) in reference to the steps to be taken for application for the release of men from the Forces
(2) as to the amounts of War Bonuses granted to the administrative technical and clerical staffs of Local Authorities and setting out copy of such bonuses now authorised for permanent Civil Servants
(3) stating that the Board would shortly forward to the Treasurer an order for the payment of the sum of 18s/3d in respect of the cost of the funeral expenses of John Meikalik
(4) in reference to special allowances at Christmas time
(5) setting out a copy of Section 10 of the War Pensions (Administrative Provisions) Act 1918 in reference to application of any part of a pension towards the relief and maintenance of a person not being his wife or child
(6) requesting that the returns of pauperism may now be sent weekly as heretofore instead of monthly during the War. Resolved that the returns be made weekly as requested by the Board.

2. from the Clerk to the Wallingford Union in reference to the grant of war bonuses and inquiring what steps the Board had taken and requesting a reply by the 10th inst. The Clerk reported that he
Had replied giving particulars of the recent grant of war bonuses by the Board to the Officers.

3. from the Clerk to the Lewisham Union setting out copy of a resolution passed by that Board in reference to the handing over of the Ex-Kaiser for trial …

Minutes of Abingdon Board of Guardians (G/A1/33)

Discharge papers produced by vagrants

Not all demobilised soldiers came home to the security of a job.

10th December 1918

Vagrants

Leter from secretary suggesting that when discharge papers are produced by a man asking for admission to the Institution or Casual ward, the Local War Pensions Committee should be communicated with.

The Clerk was instructed to ask the Matron to carry out this suggestion.

War Bonuses

Letter from the Medical Officers and Relieving Officers applying for a war bonus.

Letter from the Clerk of the Wallingford Guardians suggesting unanimity of action amongst neighbouring Guardians.

The Chairman & Clerk were instructed to meet the Chairmen & Clerks of the adjoining Unions if such a Meeting could be arranged to discuss the matter.

Faringdon Board of Guardians minutes (G/F1/44)

Fruit and nuts for gas masks

Wallingford boys were collecting various kinds of fruit.

Wallingford
1918, 18 September

Visited (pm) by Mr J Brown in connection with arrangements for collection of blackberries. We are already collecting nut-shells and plum-stones, for carbon used in gasmasks.

Hurst
18th September 1918

School closed the whole day owing to the Hurst fete at Staines Hill for the providing of funds for the Hurst prisoners of war.

Aldermaston
18th September 1918

Half holiday, 68lbs of blackberries.

Buscot
Sept. 18th

Older children gathered 88 ½ lbs blackberries – sent to Faringdon.

Log books: Wallingford Boys Council School (SCH22/8/3); Aldermaston School (88/SCH/3/3, p. 94); Hurst C of E Boys School (D/P73/28/23, p. 37)Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2);

Not possible to start a Cadet Corps at Wallingford Grammar School

Many teachers were absent serving their country.


Secondary Schools

WALLINGFORD COUNTY GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

The Governors have considered the question of the formation of a Cadet Company in connexion with the school, but have decided, in view of the present shortage of staff and the many calls on the time of the Head Master, that it is not possible to adopt the proposal at the present time….

BURSARS AND STUDENT TEACHERS

Of ten Student Teachers whose engagements terminate on 31 July, one is already on Military Service … and one is due for Military Service.

Report of the Higher Education Sub-committee to Berkshire Education Committee, 13 July 1918 (C/CL/C1/1/21)

Bring your own potatoes

Pupils learning to cook during the war had to use potatoes for pastry dough.

28 May 1918

Cookery: Course I. N. Moreton 5. S. Moreton 8. Wallingford C.E. 5

No. 12

Date: May 28th
Time: 1.45-4pm

Lesson: Shortcrust pastry. Tarts [alternative]

No. present: 8

Signature: R. D. Bronsdon.

Girls brought own potatoes for pastry.

Wallingford Cookery Centre Log Book, 1914-1920 (SCH22/8/5, pp. 169-170)

Both scout and cadet training should form part of the ordinary curriculum

Berkshire teenagers, whether they were still at school or had left to start work at 14, were encouraged to undertake semi-military training in cadet corps.

The following letters have been referred to us for consideration, viz:

9/3/18, from the Secretary of the County Territorial Association to the Secretary of the Berks Education Committee.
23/3/18, from General Sir R Scallon (Director General’s Department, War Office) to the said Association.
2/4/18, from General Sir H Sclater (GOC in C Southern Command) to the same.

The general effect of these letters is as follows, viz: The
Education Committee are specifically asked:

To give official recognition to the Cadet Companies already raised in the County Boys’ Schools of Windsor and Maidenhead, both of which units are recognised by the War Office and are affiliated to the 4th Royal Berks Regiment.

(Note – It is to be noted that the only other cadet units so recognised by the War Office as operating in the county are The Douai Cadet Company, affiliated to the 4th Royal Berks, and the 2nd and 4th Oxford Cadet CLB Battalions, both affiliated to the KRR. The Reading Cadet Company, affiliated to the 4th Royal Berks, is also mentioned as recognised, but this unit draws its recruits from the Borough rather than the County area.)

To urge upon other school masters the importance of raising cadet companies “in the schools throughout the County”.

It is, further, strongly recommended that a Committee should be formed in the County (Sir Robert Scallon suggesting that the Education Committee should undertake the formation of it) with a view to the development of the cadet movement. This Committee would be composed of the Director of Education (i.e. the Education Secretary), of leading gentlemen in the County who are interested in the movement, of employers of boy labour, of the secretary and representative of the Territorial Association, and of representatives of the volunteers and of labour interests. The functions of the Committee would be the encouragement and co-ordination of cadet corps, boy scouts, wolf cubs, and similar organisations, and would also have regard to boys outside any existing organisation. The Committee would not interfere with existing units. Sir H Sclater remarks that a Committee of this kind has been formed for Worcestershire and that it is doing excellent work.

It is pointed out that “the cadet movement is not a military one”, the aim being “the improvement both in character and physique of the boys”. Organised games should form a large part of the training.
Boys, it is considered by the War Office, should be encouraged to be scouts until aged 14 or 15; they should be cadets until 17, when “they might join Section C or the Volunteers if they are so willing”. Scouts wishing to be cadets need not cease to be scouts.
With regard to secondary schools, the writers suggest that both scout and cadet training should form part of the ordinary curriculum; also that school units should as a rule be grouped together, and not form part of either an adult unit nor of a cadet corps composed of boys who have ceased to attend school.
Corps composed of several school units should come together for the yearly Battalion camp, and be under the command of a suitably qualified man, whether a military officer or not.

We are not clear what “official recognition” of existing cadet companies would imply, or what expenditure by the Local Authority would be involved, or how far this could be legally incurred. Moreover, we are disposed to think that any recognition afforded to cadets should be available for scouts…

The Local Education Authority have no authority over secondary schools not maintained by them. Of boys’ schools so maintained, Wallingford School is the only one without a cadet unit. We recommend that the question of the formation of a cadet company at that school be brought to the notice of the governors with a view to their favourable consideration.

We think that such a Committee as is suggested might do good spade-work locally… Whether the Education Committee should take the lead in this matter, or whether it should be left to the Territorial Association is a matter for consideration. On the whole, having regard to the facts that the cadet movement is definitely non-military and that the Local Education Authority is likely to have increasing opportunities of keeping in touch with the lads, the advantages of the former course seems to us to be greater. On the other hand, the work, if taken over by the Education Committee, must eventually throw greater burdens on a depleted and overworked staff, and the suggested constitution of the proposed committee hardly seems to secure to the Local Education Authority such a voice in the proceedings as would be necessary if public money, assigned for educational purposes, is to be expended.

Report of Cadet Training Sub-committee to Berkshire Education Committee, 27 April 1918 (C/CL/C1/1/21)

The best results are obtained only by getting into touch with the men personally

Thousands of wounded or sick troops had now returned home. the nation owed them support for their service. Some needed medical help, others re-training for new occupations, or help finding jobs.

The Disablements Sub-committee beg to report that they have been notified of approximately 2,524 disabled soldiers and sailors discharged into the county. Of the cases now entered upon the Register, which exclude those being investigated, the numbers specifying disabilities are as follows:

Amputation of leg or foot 51
Amputation of arm or hand 34
Other wounds or injuries to leg or foot 353
Other wounds or injuries to arm or hand 147
Other wounds or injuries to head 69
Other wounds or injuries 192
Blindness and other eye affections 77
Heart diseases 217
Chest complaints 93
Tuberculosis 101
Deafness and affections of the ear 72
Rheumatism 151
Epilepsy 37
Neurasthenia 47
Other mental affections 31
Other disabilities 532

Of this number all have been provided with a Medical Attendant [i.e. a doctor] under the National Health Insurance Act, and special treatment, including the supply or repair of artificial limbs and surgical appliances, has been provided in accordance with the recommendations of Military Authorities, Medical Boards or ordinary medical Attendants.

From the 1 April 1917, 280 cases have received Institutional treatment – both in and out-patient – at Military Hospitals, Civil Hospitals, Sanatoria, Cottage Hospitals or Convalescent Homes.
The total number of tuberculous soldiers and sailors to date is 101, and of these 72 have received Institutional treatment within the County under the County Scheme and three have received Institutional treatment outside the County Scheme. This treatment is provided through the County Insurance Committee.

The Committee has assisted with Buckinghamshire War Pensions Committee in the provision of a new wing for Orthopaedic Treatment at the King Edward VII Hospital, Windsor. This, which was urgently needed, and will be of the greatest benefit to men in that part of the county, will be opened in the course of two or three weeks. The Committee has also been instrumental with the Buckinghamshire Committee in obtaining the approval of the Minister of Pensions to a proposed Scheme for the provision, equipment, and establishment of a special hospital for totally disabled soldiers and sailors at Slough and an assurance from the Ministry of adequate fees for maintenance thereof. Her Royal Highness Princess Alice is forming a provisional Committee, and we have every hope that the proposed arrangements will e speedily carried into effect.
(more…)

Mr Snow’s steam-trolley

The railways might not be co-operating, but they had an ingenious solution in Wallingford.

Wallingford
1918, 5 March

Mr Snow’s steam-trolley took away 24 sacks of Horse-Chestnuts.

Aldermaston
5th March 1918

A war savings association was started this morning. 11 children became members.

Wallingford Boys Council School log book (SCH22/8/3); Aldermaston School log book (88/SCH/3/3, p. 83)

Helping the villagers to fill in forms for rationing

Two more schools were helping with the implementation of rationing, while Warfield children’s gathering of horse chestnuts had resulted in a bumper crop to turn into munitions. But not everyone was pulling together.

Sandhurst Methodist School
March 4th 1918

I (the master) was at the New hall, Sandhurst, this morning from 10-12, giving advice and help to villagers to fill in forms for rationing.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School
8th March 1918

School closed for teachers to assist with Food forms.

Warfield CE School log book (C/EL26/3)
4th March 1918

The chestnuts collected by the scholars have been sent to the munitions works.


Wallingford
1918, 4 March

Sacks for chestnuts received this morning with letter from Minister of Propellants explaining that delay is due to Railway [?] neglect!


Log books of Sandhurst Methodist School Log Book (C/EL42/2, p. 161); Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School (90/SCH/5/3, p. 41); Warfield CE School (C/EL26/3, p. 390); Wallingford Boys Council School (SCH22/8/3)

Demonstrations of War Time Cookery

The Education Committee was facing challenged with fewer teachers and more children (the latter due to the arrival of voluntary evacuees). They also encouraged cookery teachers to learn how to cope with food restrictions.

Report of the Higher Education Committee, 12 January 1918

Secondary Schools

MAIDENHEAD COUNTY BOYS’ SCHOOL
In consequence of the increased number of pupils and the difficulties caused by a further member of the staff leaving for military service, the Sub-committee have approved of the vacant place being filled by a whole-time Mistress and a part-time Master.

WALLINGFORD COUNTRY GRAMMAR SCHOOL

Mr Preece, one of the Assistants, has returned from military service, and in view of the increased numbers in attendance, the Sub-committee have authorised the retention of the substitute Mistress on the staff for the present.

Report of the School Management Sub-committee, 12 January 1918

WAR TIME COOKERY

The Domestic Subject Instructresses of the County attended on December 13 and 14 a series of demonstrations on War Time Cookery arranged by the Ministry of Food, who paid their expenses.

Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/21)

The provision of light employment for discharged partially disabled men incapable of doing a full day’s work

The Disablements Sub-committee of the Berkshire War Pensions Committee reported on training programmes for disabled ex-soldiers, who faced an uncertain future.

The Disablements Sub-committee beg to report that the two schemes for training at Basildon and Windsor have now been approved by the Pensions Minister, with the exception of boot-making at Basildon, which is only provisionally sanctioned. The gardening course at Windsor has been extended from six to twelve months for suitable cases. Both schemes are now in full operation. Since the last meeting the Royal Warrant of April 1917 for treatment and training has come into force, payments being made under it as from 23 July 1917.

A list of hospitals throughout the county where treatment can be obtained for discharged men has been sent forward for approval to the Pensions Minister, also a special application for further necessary accommodation for out-patient treatment at King Edward VII Hospital, Windsor, to enable the authorities of that hospital to provide orthopaedic treatment for discharged disabled men within a radius of ten miles of that hospital. A special request was also put forward as regards the lack of hospital facilities in parts of North Berkshire, especially in the Wallingford District. It is proposed to formulate a scheme to include all facilities and arrangements for medical treatment and submit it as a whole for the approval of the Pensions Minister.

The National Health Insurance Commissioners have made new arrangements in respect of medical benefit for all discharged soldiers and sailors invalided from the Service, and have included those whose incomes do not exceed £160 per annum. Medical Practitioners are required to report to the Insurance Committee as to any special treatment to be provided by the Disablements Committee under the arrangements above alluded to. The scheme will also provide for any treatment recommended by a medical board for a man after his discharge, or for any man for whom treatment is recommended at the time of his discharge from the service by his invaliding board.

Instructions having been received from the Pensions Minister that discharged men who are not in receipt of a pension owing to the disability for which they were discharged not being considered attributable or aggravated by war service have now been afforded facilities for appealing against this decision. Instructions have been issued to all Sub-committees that such cases should be referred to this Committee. Three cases for appeal are coming up shortly for consideration.

The provision of light employment for discharged partially disabled men who are incapable of doing a full day’s work has been considered. A joint public appeal with the County Borough of Reading Committee has been issued through the Press to employers throughout the county for help in this important matter…

During the last three months 643 cases have been entered on the Register, making a total of 1,513 cases. In addition 325 cases (approximately) are being investigated. 512 new cases have been sent out to the various Sub-committees as follows:

Abingdon 34
Easthampstead 20
Faringdon 20
Hungerford 13
Lambourn 5
Maidenhead 72
Newbury 84
Reading Rural 43
Wallingford 27
Wantage 27
Windsor 95
Wokingham 52

220 cases have been considered by the Disablements Committee, treatment in hospital has been arranged for 62 cases, Sanatorium treatment for 7 cases, special training for 23 cases, and a number of men have been placed in employment.

12 November 1917

Berkshire County Council minutes, 1917 (C/CL1/1/21)

War Savings have fallen to the lowest level yet reached

Was enthusiasm for the war subsiding?

1917, 2 October

Receipts of War Savings Association have fallen to the lowest level yet reached.

Wallingford Boys Council School log book (SCH22/8/3, p. 63)