The great silence: the sacrifice of those who fell must not be in vain

The first Remembrance Day was observed in churches across the county.

Wargrave

Armistice Day

The first anniversary was well observed in the parish. There was a celebration of Holy Communion at 8 a.m. A muffled peal was rung from 10.30 to 10.45 a.m. A service in church was held at 10.45 and ended with the two minutes of silence when 11 o’clock was struck on the tenor bell. A full peal of bells, with firing, was rung in the evening. The services were well attended and ringing was exceptionally good.

Crazies Hill Notes

On November 11th an Intercessory Service was held in memory of those who laid down their lives during the War, and, at the hour of eleven, a silent tribute was paid to the fallen. Those moments of meditation were for many of us, accompanied by grief; but there were also hope and pride and high resolve in the thoughts of all who took part in that Service. Perhaps the uppermost thought was that the sacrifice of those who fell must not be in vain.

Burghfield

Armistice Day

Rural circumstances do not lend themselves to such striking manifestations as were to be seen in towns and cities during the “great silence”. But there can have been few in the parish who did not act upon the King’s suggestion and desire. Many of us would like this mute solemn commemoration to be repeated annually.


Ascot

On the Anniversary of the Armistice there was a special Celebration of the Holy Communion at 10.40 at which all our parishioners, who gave their lives in the War, were remembered by name.
The service was so timed that, at the moment of silence throughout the Empire, the large congregation was in the act of pleading the Sacrifice of Christ for the Living and the Dead.

In the evening there was a special Service of Thanksgiving , when we prayed for God’s Blessing upon the Ex-Service Men’s Club, the first portion of the Ascot War Memorial, which was declared open by Lady Roberts, and handed over to the Men’s Committee immediately afterwards. During the first week over 150 men joined the club.

Cranbourne

On Armistice Day a large number of our Parishioners came to Church at a few minutes before eleven o’clock and spent the time in silent prayer. After the bell had struck eleven strokes and the two minutes had elapsed, a Celebration of the Holy Communion took place. Instead of a sermon the Vicar read Mr. Arkwright’s no well-known hymn “O Valiant hearts” and before the Church Militant Prayer the names of all our fallen were read at the altar and specially commended to God’s keeping.


Newbury

On Armistice Day, November 11th, we kept the King’s command by holding a Special Service at 10.55, including the two minutes silence at 11 o’clock. There was a large congregation. The sights in the streets of our great cities, when all traffic stopped and men stood with bared heads, must have been most striking. Truly does the whole Empire honour the men who gave their lives in God’s Cause of Righteousness.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1919 (D/P145/28A/31); Ascot and Cranbourne in Winkfield District Magazine, December 1919 (D/P 151/ 28A/11/12); Burghfield parish magazine, December 1919 (D/EX725/4); Newbury parish magazine, December1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

Bravery during the last Offensive Operations on the Marne

A soldier with links to Wargrave was honoured by our French allies.

Crazies Hill Notes

We are very pleased to record that Mr. Walter George, Gunner in the Royal Marines Artillery, has been awarded the French decoration, Croix de Guerre, for bravery during the last Offensive Operations on the Marne.

Mr George is well-known at Crazies Hill, where his wife, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Waldron, resides.

Wargrave parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

There should be some sort of Peace Memorial

There were mixed views in Wargrave as to how to commemorate the war.

October
Peace Memorial

The Parish has summoned a Parish Meeting for Friday, October 10th, which will be held 7.15 p.m. in the Woodclyffe Hall.

It is felt that this would be a suitable occasion for raising the question of a Peace Memorial in the Parish.

I. – There is a very general feeling that there should be some memorial in the Parish Church, in memory of those who fell and to record the names of those whose lives were freely jeopardised for the glory of God. Such a memorial has been already dedicated in the East Window, as a tribute from an individual donor, and it will be completed by a Chancel Screen with the names carved on the panels. But there are those who would like to have a share in raising a General Memorial, which would remain as a tribute from the parish as a whole. With this view the East End of the South Aisle was specially reserved by a Resolution of the Vestry. Sir Charles Nicholson has prepared a scheme of decoration, for this which will be submitted to the meeting on Friday, Oct. 10th. It provides for a screen, in continuation of the proposed Chancery Screen, and for the panelling of the walls. A lectern might be added with a large volume, after the fashion of an old chained bible, in which the names might be engrossed and biographical particulars added. We should thus have a Place of Memorial.

No scheme of embellishment can give to any part of the church the least dignity and sanctity without making it a place of Communion, because the whole plan in the building and decorating of our churches is to lead the worshippers to the altar, as that to which everything else is subordinated. In our Peace Memorial there is unfortunately no space for an altar. But the East Window of the chancel itself is a memorial to the fallen and all who approach the choir to enter the sanctuary will see the names on the chancel screen.

II. – there are also those who feel that there should be some sort of Peace Memorial outside the church. If so it would seem that this should be either a monument to commemorate the services rendered or an institution to benefit the families of those who served and their children after them.

There may be many suggestions made when the opportunity of the public meeting gives occasion and, if so, the widest possible range is to be encouraged. We want all the suggestions which commend themselves to the different views and tastes of parishioners. It will be easy to refer such proposals to a committee, who shall report to a subsequent meeting, if such a course is thought to be advisable.

It is therefore to be hoped that the meeting will be very largely attended.

The actual purpose for which the meeting is summoned is to decide about a German Gun.

The War Office has sent a 77 m/m Field Gun and Carriage to the Parish Council to be kept in the parish as a public trophy of the great victory and as an acknowledgement of the V.C. which adorns the Wargrave Roll of Honour.

It has been presented to the Parish Council that there is some difference of opinion as to how the gift should be dealt with. The Parish Council has therefore summoned a Public Meeting of the Parishioners to decide the matter.

November
The Parish Meeting

Three matters were brought before the Parish Meeting, which was summoned by the Parish Council on Friday, October 10th, at the Woodclyffe Hall. The Peace Memorial, a German Gun presented by the Trophies Committee of the War Office, and a new Burial Ground.

There were very diverse subjects, but in each case it was felt that the matter should be put to the widest possible vote, and when the prospect arose of a largely attended meeting it seemed best to take the opportunity of bringing them all forward on the same night.

The Peace Memorial

The Vicar, as chairman of the Parish Council, presided. He introduced the subject by explaining that there was no notice of any particular Resolution before the meeting, but it would seem that a Peace Memorial should either take the form of some sort of monument to commemorate the fallen, or some sort of institution to benefit those who had served in the Great War or their dependents.

A memorial to the fallen might be either inside the Church or outside. A memorial was already secured inside the Church in the East Window and Chancel Screen given by Sir William and Lady Cain. The names of the fallen would be carved on the panels of the screen. But this was an individual gift and several people had expressed a wish to add something more, as a memorial by public subscription. Any such proposal having to do with the fabric of the Parish Church must be submitted to a “Vestry Meeting”.

A Vestry Meeting had decided that the East End of the South Aisle should be reserved as a Place of Memorial and the walls had therefore been left free from individual tablets. The consulting architect, Sir Charles Nicholson, had considered that if this proposal was eventually adopted the best [plan would be to erect a screen, in harmony with the Chancel Screen, and to panel the walls in oak. It would be possible to preserve a record of the names of all who had served, together with biographical particulars of the fallen, in a book, after the fashion of a chained bible, on a Lectern inside the screen. Sir Charles Nicholson’s sketch design was exhibited in the Hall.

After some discussion it was proposed that a Committee be appointed to consider the best form of Peace Memorial outside the Church and to report. The following gentlemen were elected on the Committee with power to add to their number:- Messrs. R. Sharp, H. A. Hunt, T. H. Barley, F. Headington, A. B. Booth, W. Sansom, J. Richardson, J. Hodge, Major Howard Jones, Col. C. Nicholl, Major K. Nicholl, and Dr. McCrea.

Another Parish Meeting will be summoned in due course to receive the report of this Committee.

It is no doubt a good thing to leave the question of any Memorial inside the Church to a Vestry Meeting. A Vestry is an equally public Meeting, but it is summoned by the Vicar and Churchwardens and is technically qualified to apply to the Chancellor of the Diocese for het legal ‘faculty,’ which gives permission to proceed with the work. A Parish Meeting summoned by the Parish Council is not thus qualified and could only make a recommendation to a Vestry.

The German Gun

The next question was that of the German Gun. A resolution asking the Parish Council to accept the trophy was lost by a considerable majority.


Wargrave parish magazine, October and November 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Fireworks and flowers

Victory Flower Show

Sir William Cain has arranged a magnificent show of Fireworks in the Park at Wargrave Manor, to which he has issued a general invitation to all ticket holders of the Flower Show.

Full particulars of the Show and of the Sports have already been published. Tea will be obtainable on the ground at a reasonable price.

Admission to the show will be by ticket at the following prices at the gate: – From 2-3.30 p.m. 1/-; from 3.30-5 p.m. 6d.; from 5-7.30 p.m. 3d. Children under the age of 14 half price from 2-5 p.m.; 5-7.30 p.m. 2d.

All Exhibitors will have one Free Ticket of Admission.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Somewhere on the march between Baghdad and Mosul

It took years for some deaths to be confirmed.

Roll Of Honour:
R.I.P

Hodge, Albert. Lance-Corporal Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, died in Mesopotamia, July, 1916, aged 26. He was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hodge of Wargrave. When war broke out he was serving in India. He was sent straight to Mesopotamia and was taken prisoner at Kut. All that is known is that he left Baghdad about July 17th, 1916 with a party of prisoners and died somewhere on the march between Baghdad and Mosul.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The Peace Dinner is a success

An entertainment was offered to Wargrave’s ex-servicemen.

August
The Peace Dinner

It is proposed to entertain to dinner on Saturday August 2nd, all the men of Wargrave who have served their Country in His Majesty’s uniform during the war.

The dinner will be in the Woodclyffe Hall and will be followed by a Smoking Concert.


September
The Peace Dinner

A Dinner was held in the Woodclyffe Hall on Saturday, August 2nd, to which all the men of Wargrave, who had served their Country in His Majesty’s Uniform during the war, were invited. There were more than two hundred guests and the evening passed very happily. Fortunately the weather was fine, so that it was possible to get an extra table out of doors and people could pass in and out in comfort. Mr. Henry Bond presided. The usual toasts were honoured. Sir James Remnant and Major Howard Jones, D.S.O., responded for the guests.

The dinner was followed by an exceedingly good smoking concert for which Mr. A. Booth was entirely responsible. A large number of people had worked hard to make the evening a success and they were amply rewarded.

Wargrave parish magazines, August and September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The elephant had taken four years to grow its tail

Hare Hatch children had their first party since before the war.

On Saturday, July 26th, we had another example of Mrs. Young’s great kindness to and interest in Hare Hatch. The Sunday School Children, Choir Members and other Guests including Members of the Mothers Meeting were invited to the Lodge. After games in the meadow the children enjoyed a splendid tea. The chief attraction of their tea was the ‘Elephant’s Tail’. As there had been no treat since the early part of the war, one of the scholars aptly remarked that the elephant had taken four years to grow its tail. When tea was finished the adults were able to enjoy a number of very interesting and amusing games organised by the Misses Huggins. The children also had their games, cricket in the meadow for the boys, skipping etc., for the girls, and a few had quieter games on the lawn. Before dispersing, a hearty vote of thanks was unanimously accorded to Mrs. Young for a most enjoyable time.

Hare Hatch section of Wargrave parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Impossible to hold a Public Holiday without some form of public entertainment

Sports took centre stage at the Wargrave peace celebrations.

The Peace Holiday

July 19th, 1919, was proclaimed as the Peace Holiday with very short notice for the necessary arrangements. The first suggestion was that Wargrave Regatta should be held on that day, but after very careful going into the matter the Amusements Sub-Committee reported that it was impossible. The Committee therefore abandoned the attempt and fixed August 9th for the Regatta.

It was, however clearly impossible to hold a Public Holiday without some form of public entertainment, but there was no time to summon a public meeting to discuss what should be done. So it was suggested that there should be a Tea and Sports for everyone and it was ultimately decided that the Recreation Ground would be the most suitable place. It was understood that upon such an occasion all parishioners would like to have an opportunity to contribute, so it was decided that a circular letter should be issued, inviting subscriptions, and that a box for contributions should be set at the gate; but it was necessary to enter upon the expenditure at once, if arrangements were to be made in time, so Sir William Cain and Mr Henry Bond very kindly acted as guarantors.

All arrangements were made by the Committees, which enrolled about seventy-five people, all of whom worked hard for the success of the day.

The Sports Committee was fortunate in having Captain Lindemere as Secretary and the whole of the Cricket Club Committee kindly joined forces with them.

Mr. P. H. Stringer was elected Master of Ceremonies for the Sports with the task of arranging the order of events. This was not an easy matter, because there was no opportunity to make out a time-table beforehand and the events had to be so arranged as to leave the outer course free when the rope was let down at tea time. But all difficulties were overcome and the programme went with a swing from start to finish. All the competitors ran well (including the PIG), no obstacle proved insuperable, and those who did not win the first prizes will have another opportunity at the Victory Flower Show, on Wednesday, September 3rd.

The Wargrave Lads’ Club gave a very good gymnastic display which was most appreciated by everyone.

The weather was not all that could be desired, but it might have been very much worse and the rain in the morning was a warning to everyone to come prepared for heavy showers. At all events there were some bright intervals and some quite long periods without rain.

The Children

There must be a special paragraph for the children, because they have a special place in everyone’s thoughts when there is a Public Holiday on an historic occasion and we want them to remember it in after years.

There is no doubt they had a first rate time on July 19th. The day began with a parade at the Piggott School when every child was presented with a half-crown and a bag of chocolates from Sir William and Lady Cain. These were presented by Miss Cain and every coin was fresh from the mint dated with 1919.

Then there were races at the Recreation Ground, where Major Kenneth Nicholl and others kindly worked off some forty heats to relieve the programme for the afternoon.

The fun began again at half-past one, in spite of the rain, with special treats for children under seven. A Ladies’ Committee had taken entire charge of these infants and provided all sorts of pleasures ending up with a Bran Pie and a present for every one.

Then came tea, and afterwards a victory medal for each child presented by Mr. Bond. And all the afternoon there were the sports to watch, and a wonderfully caparisoned steed to ride, led by an oriental gentleman beautifully attired and a hurdy gurdy which played whenever the Band was at rest, and dancing in the tent to finish the day, altogether a very happy time.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Peace Day Celebrations were duly held at Crazies Hill on July 19th, and many appear to have thoroughly enjoyed the day, in spite of the inclemency of the weather. Over three hundred people, old and young, were entertained to dinner and tea. A Cricket match, Married Versus Single, resulted in a close victory for the Single eleven. Then followed sports, for which there were many entries, and a tug-of-war. In the evening, a firework display brought to a close a memorable occasion.

The congratulations of all are due to the Committee on having organised a most successful day’s proceedings, which will long be remembered by those who took part in the festivities.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

A superb investment

The country was still paying for the war.

Hare Hatch Notes: The Victory Loan

The object of the loan is to place our Country’s finance on a firm foundation. It has a claim hardly less imperious that that of any loan in the last four years. Even the small investor has his chance, by purchasing a war savings certificate, which costs the holder 15/-. H. C. Bond, Esq., generously adds 6d. to each certificate up to 25. In ten years time 26/- is paid for the 15/6 certificate. This is a superb investment. By means of the coupons small sums can be paid weekly as well as larger sums. We strongly advise our readers to save their money and invest it in war savings certificates. Mr. Chenery will gladly give any information that may be desired.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The church was filled with thankful people on Peace Sunday

Peace Sunday

The services on Sunday, June 29th, were given a special character of Thanksgiving for the Signing of Peace. There were processions and a solemn Te Deum, with special psalms and lessons. But Sunday July 6th, was fixed by authority as Peace Sunday. The church was filled with thankful people, a solemn Te Deum was sung at both Mattins and Evensong, and the special forms of service were used throughout the day.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

“There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease “

It was hoped that women who had worked together for the benefit of soldiers, might continue to help other deserving causes.

Crazies Hill Notes: Working Party

The Working Party which has done such excellent work during the war, was invited to a final meeting at Hennerton, on Friday, June 13th. There was a very large attendance and the weather was glorious. In the early afternoon the gardens were much enjoyed. Tea was at four o’clock. The party assembled afterwards in the drawing room, where Mrs Rhodes presented Souvenir Cards to all the members.

The Vicar in expressing the thanks of all concerned to Miss Rhodes for the very happy meetings which had been arranged, said that he had been asked to say that the members much hoped that Miss Rhodes would re-open the meetings in the autumn, and that they would be very pleased to work under her kindly leadership for any object she might choose.

This promises very well for the future. There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease altogether. Many people have acquired new habits of industry and there are many good objects which they could greatly benefit.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The main Military Celebrations for the County of Berks shall take place in Reading

Preparations were underway for official Berkshire celebrations of the peace.

County Peace Celebrations

The Peace Celebrations Committee have decided that the main Military Celebrations for the County of Berks shall take place in Reading.

It is to be understood that this day is not intended to prevent Boroughs or Parishes from organizing local celebrations on another day, though it is hoped that the celebrations in Reading may be looked upon by all as being representative of the County.

The Reading programme is to include a parade and March Past, at which the Lord Lieutenant will take the Salute. The troops will then be entertained to dinner and Sports will be arranged for them in the afternoon. An invitation will be extended to all Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Men who have served overseas.

The Hon. Secretary for the Peace Celebrations Committee is Major A.S. Turner, The Barracks, Reading.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

No further appeal for vegetables is necessary

Another war hospital closed its doors.

Hare Hatch Notes

Congratulations to Corporal John Milford upon his having gained the Military Medal for Gallantry in the Field.

With the closing of the V.A.D. Hospital no further appeal for supply of vegetables is necessary. We desire to thank those who sent their gifts so regularly.

A.E.C.
Wargrave parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

“It is not only the world of nature that is pulsing with the promise of new life, we are all hoping to see a better world after the terrible days of war”

The vicar of Wargrave had a postwar Easter message.

Lent

Easter comes late this year and “Lent”, which means “Spring” should be full of the promise of its name. But it is not only the world of nature that is pulsing with the promise of new life, we are all hoping to see a better world after the terrible days of war. So our thoughts turn to the Terms of Peace and we pray for the statesmen concerned that they may be filled with the Spirit of wisdom and counsel.

We could not find a better subject for Lenten thought, prayer and effort than the Terms of Peace.

When we think of the Paris Conference we pray for such a Peace as may advance the Kingdom of God. We know that God rules over the affairs of men and is working His purpose out through human history. The policy of nations may be so directed as to obstruct His purpose. When this is so we learn from history that man may obstruct but cannot frustrate God’s will. God overrules the stubborn policy of Pharraoh and with a mighty hand He brings His people out. But it is also true that the policy of nations may be harmonious with the will of God. It is so when the endeavour is to loose the bands of wickedness, to undo heavy burdens, to let the oppressed go free and to break every yoke. “Happy is that people; that is in such a case: yea, happy is that people whose God is the Lord.”

When we think of Industrial Peace in our own country we know the terms upon which it can be secured, they are to be found within the circle of family life, where they are reorganised as being ordained of God. For by one Spirit are we all baptised into one body. And whether one member suffer all members suffer with it; or one member be honoured; all members rejoice with it. “Let nothing be done through strife of vainglory; but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves. Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others.” “Be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love.”

When we think of inward troubles, each one of the plague of his own heart, we know Who has made Peace through the blood of His cross. The terms are open to us without money and without price. “Come now, let us reason together, such the Lord; though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” “Repent and turn yourselves from all your transgressions; so injury shall not be your ruin.”

“Come unto me all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest”.

The Book of Revelation has a special message for such times as we have passed through during the last four years but it is not easy to understand. Perhaps there are some people who will like to make it a subject of special reading during Lent.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The terms of peace

A Berkshire vicar guided his flock in thoughts about how the post-war world should look.

Crazies Hill Notes

On the Sunday Evenings during Lent a course of sermons will be preached by the Vicar, Subject:- The Terms of Peace.

i. Between the Kingdoms of the World
ii. Between Capital and Labour
iii. Between Members of a Family
iv. Between God and Man
v. Between a man and his own heart

May this coming season of Lent be a time of rich blessing to us all, drawing us closer to our Lord in prayer and self-denial, so that the Easter Festival may find us prepared to rejoice in His glorious Resurrection.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)