Somewhere on the march between Baghdad and Mosul

It took years for some deaths to be confirmed.

Roll Of Honour:
R.I.P

Hodge, Albert. Lance-Corporal Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, died in Mesopotamia, July, 1916, aged 26. He was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hodge of Wargrave. When war broke out he was serving in India. He was sent straight to Mesopotamia and was taken prisoner at Kut. All that is known is that he left Baghdad about July 17th, 1916 with a party of prisoners and died somewhere on the march between Baghdad and Mosul.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

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The Peace Dinner is a success

An entertainment was offered to Wargrave’s ex-servicemen.

August
The Peace Dinner

It is proposed to entertain to dinner on Saturday August 2nd, all the men of Wargrave who have served their Country in His Majesty’s uniform during the war.

The dinner will be in the Woodclyffe Hall and will be followed by a Smoking Concert.


September
The Peace Dinner

A Dinner was held in the Woodclyffe Hall on Saturday, August 2nd, to which all the men of Wargrave, who had served their Country in His Majesty’s Uniform during the war, were invited. There were more than two hundred guests and the evening passed very happily. Fortunately the weather was fine, so that it was possible to get an extra table out of doors and people could pass in and out in comfort. Mr. Henry Bond presided. The usual toasts were honoured. Sir James Remnant and Major Howard Jones, D.S.O., responded for the guests.

The dinner was followed by an exceedingly good smoking concert for which Mr. A. Booth was entirely responsible. A large number of people had worked hard to make the evening a success and they were amply rewarded.

Wargrave parish magazines, August and September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The elephant had taken four years to grow its tail

Hare Hatch children had their first party since before the war.

On Saturday, July 26th, we had another example of Mrs. Young’s great kindness to and interest in Hare Hatch. The Sunday School Children, Choir Members and other Guests including Members of the Mothers Meeting were invited to the Lodge. After games in the meadow the children enjoyed a splendid tea. The chief attraction of their tea was the ‘Elephant’s Tail’. As there had been no treat since the early part of the war, one of the scholars aptly remarked that the elephant had taken four years to grow its tail. When tea was finished the adults were able to enjoy a number of very interesting and amusing games organised by the Misses Huggins. The children also had their games, cricket in the meadow for the boys, skipping etc., for the girls, and a few had quieter games on the lawn. Before dispersing, a hearty vote of thanks was unanimously accorded to Mrs. Young for a most enjoyable time.

Hare Hatch section of Wargrave parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Impossible to hold a Public Holiday without some form of public entertainment

Sports took centre stage at the Wargrave peace celebrations.

The Peace Holiday

July 19th, 1919, was proclaimed as the Peace Holiday with very short notice for the necessary arrangements. The first suggestion was that Wargrave Regatta should be held on that day, but after very careful going into the matter the Amusements Sub-Committee reported that it was impossible. The Committee therefore abandoned the attempt and fixed August 9th for the Regatta.

It was, however clearly impossible to hold a Public Holiday without some form of public entertainment, but there was no time to summon a public meeting to discuss what should be done. So it was suggested that there should be a Tea and Sports for everyone and it was ultimately decided that the Recreation Ground would be the most suitable place. It was understood that upon such an occasion all parishioners would like to have an opportunity to contribute, so it was decided that a circular letter should be issued, inviting subscriptions, and that a box for contributions should be set at the gate; but it was necessary to enter upon the expenditure at once, if arrangements were to be made in time, so Sir William Cain and Mr Henry Bond very kindly acted as guarantors.

All arrangements were made by the Committees, which enrolled about seventy-five people, all of whom worked hard for the success of the day.

The Sports Committee was fortunate in having Captain Lindemere as Secretary and the whole of the Cricket Club Committee kindly joined forces with them.

Mr. P. H. Stringer was elected Master of Ceremonies for the Sports with the task of arranging the order of events. This was not an easy matter, because there was no opportunity to make out a time-table beforehand and the events had to be so arranged as to leave the outer course free when the rope was let down at tea time. But all difficulties were overcome and the programme went with a swing from start to finish. All the competitors ran well (including the PIG), no obstacle proved insuperable, and those who did not win the first prizes will have another opportunity at the Victory Flower Show, on Wednesday, September 3rd.

The Wargrave Lads’ Club gave a very good gymnastic display which was most appreciated by everyone.

The weather was not all that could be desired, but it might have been very much worse and the rain in the morning was a warning to everyone to come prepared for heavy showers. At all events there were some bright intervals and some quite long periods without rain.

The Children

There must be a special paragraph for the children, because they have a special place in everyone’s thoughts when there is a Public Holiday on an historic occasion and we want them to remember it in after years.

There is no doubt they had a first rate time on July 19th. The day began with a parade at the Piggott School when every child was presented with a half-crown and a bag of chocolates from Sir William and Lady Cain. These were presented by Miss Cain and every coin was fresh from the mint dated with 1919.

Then there were races at the Recreation Ground, where Major Kenneth Nicholl and others kindly worked off some forty heats to relieve the programme for the afternoon.

The fun began again at half-past one, in spite of the rain, with special treats for children under seven. A Ladies’ Committee had taken entire charge of these infants and provided all sorts of pleasures ending up with a Bran Pie and a present for every one.

Then came tea, and afterwards a victory medal for each child presented by Mr. Bond. And all the afternoon there were the sports to watch, and a wonderfully caparisoned steed to ride, led by an oriental gentleman beautifully attired and a hurdy gurdy which played whenever the Band was at rest, and dancing in the tent to finish the day, altogether a very happy time.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Peace Day Celebrations were duly held at Crazies Hill on July 19th, and many appear to have thoroughly enjoyed the day, in spite of the inclemency of the weather. Over three hundred people, old and young, were entertained to dinner and tea. A Cricket match, Married Versus Single, resulted in a close victory for the Single eleven. Then followed sports, for which there were many entries, and a tug-of-war. In the evening, a firework display brought to a close a memorable occasion.

The congratulations of all are due to the Committee on having organised a most successful day’s proceedings, which will long be remembered by those who took part in the festivities.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

A superb investment

The country was still paying for the war.

Hare Hatch Notes: The Victory Loan

The object of the loan is to place our Country’s finance on a firm foundation. It has a claim hardly less imperious that that of any loan in the last four years. Even the small investor has his chance, by purchasing a war savings certificate, which costs the holder 15/-. H. C. Bond, Esq., generously adds 6d. to each certificate up to 25. In ten years time 26/- is paid for the 15/6 certificate. This is a superb investment. By means of the coupons small sums can be paid weekly as well as larger sums. We strongly advise our readers to save their money and invest it in war savings certificates. Mr. Chenery will gladly give any information that may be desired.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The church was filled with thankful people on Peace Sunday

Peace Sunday

The services on Sunday, June 29th, were given a special character of Thanksgiving for the Signing of Peace. There were processions and a solemn Te Deum, with special psalms and lessons. But Sunday July 6th, was fixed by authority as Peace Sunday. The church was filled with thankful people, a solemn Te Deum was sung at both Mattins and Evensong, and the special forms of service were used throughout the day.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

“There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease “

It was hoped that women who had worked together for the benefit of soldiers, might continue to help other deserving causes.

Crazies Hill Notes: Working Party

The Working Party which has done such excellent work during the war, was invited to a final meeting at Hennerton, on Friday, June 13th. There was a very large attendance and the weather was glorious. In the early afternoon the gardens were much enjoyed. Tea was at four o’clock. The party assembled afterwards in the drawing room, where Mrs Rhodes presented Souvenir Cards to all the members.

The Vicar in expressing the thanks of all concerned to Miss Rhodes for the very happy meetings which had been arranged, said that he had been asked to say that the members much hoped that Miss Rhodes would re-open the meetings in the autumn, and that they would be very pleased to work under her kindly leadership for any object she might choose.

This promises very well for the future. There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease altogether. Many people have acquired new habits of industry and there are many good objects which they could greatly benefit.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The main Military Celebrations for the County of Berks shall take place in Reading

Preparations were underway for official Berkshire celebrations of the peace.

County Peace Celebrations

The Peace Celebrations Committee have decided that the main Military Celebrations for the County of Berks shall take place in Reading.

It is to be understood that this day is not intended to prevent Boroughs or Parishes from organizing local celebrations on another day, though it is hoped that the celebrations in Reading may be looked upon by all as being representative of the County.

The Reading programme is to include a parade and March Past, at which the Lord Lieutenant will take the Salute. The troops will then be entertained to dinner and Sports will be arranged for them in the afternoon. An invitation will be extended to all Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Men who have served overseas.

The Hon. Secretary for the Peace Celebrations Committee is Major A.S. Turner, The Barracks, Reading.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

No further appeal for vegetables is necessary

Another war hospital closed its doors.

Hare Hatch Notes

Congratulations to Corporal John Milford upon his having gained the Military Medal for Gallantry in the Field.

With the closing of the V.A.D. Hospital no further appeal for supply of vegetables is necessary. We desire to thank those who sent their gifts so regularly.

A.E.C.
Wargrave parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

“It is not only the world of nature that is pulsing with the promise of new life, we are all hoping to see a better world after the terrible days of war”

The vicar of Wargrave had a postwar Easter message.

Lent

Easter comes late this year and “Lent”, which means “Spring” should be full of the promise of its name. But it is not only the world of nature that is pulsing with the promise of new life, we are all hoping to see a better world after the terrible days of war. So our thoughts turn to the Terms of Peace and we pray for the statesmen concerned that they may be filled with the Spirit of wisdom and counsel.

We could not find a better subject for Lenten thought, prayer and effort than the Terms of Peace.

When we think of the Paris Conference we pray for such a Peace as may advance the Kingdom of God. We know that God rules over the affairs of men and is working His purpose out through human history. The policy of nations may be so directed as to obstruct His purpose. When this is so we learn from history that man may obstruct but cannot frustrate God’s will. God overrules the stubborn policy of Pharraoh and with a mighty hand He brings His people out. But it is also true that the policy of nations may be harmonious with the will of God. It is so when the endeavour is to loose the bands of wickedness, to undo heavy burdens, to let the oppressed go free and to break every yoke. “Happy is that people; that is in such a case: yea, happy is that people whose God is the Lord.”

When we think of Industrial Peace in our own country we know the terms upon which it can be secured, they are to be found within the circle of family life, where they are reorganised as being ordained of God. For by one Spirit are we all baptised into one body. And whether one member suffer all members suffer with it; or one member be honoured; all members rejoice with it. “Let nothing be done through strife of vainglory; but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves. Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others.” “Be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love.”

When we think of inward troubles, each one of the plague of his own heart, we know Who has made Peace through the blood of His cross. The terms are open to us without money and without price. “Come now, let us reason together, such the Lord; though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” “Repent and turn yourselves from all your transgressions; so injury shall not be your ruin.”

“Come unto me all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest”.

The Book of Revelation has a special message for such times as we have passed through during the last four years but it is not easy to understand. Perhaps there are some people who will like to make it a subject of special reading during Lent.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The terms of peace

A Berkshire vicar guided his flock in thoughts about how the post-war world should look.

Crazies Hill Notes

On the Sunday Evenings during Lent a course of sermons will be preached by the Vicar, Subject:- The Terms of Peace.

i. Between the Kingdoms of the World
ii. Between Capital and Labour
iii. Between Members of a Family
iv. Between God and Man
v. Between a man and his own heart

May this coming season of Lent be a time of rich blessing to us all, drawing us closer to our Lord in prayer and self-denial, so that the Easter Festival may find us prepared to rejoice in His glorious Resurrection.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

All those who have unselfishly put their whole heart into the work have done service of which their relations may be proud

Wargrave looked back at the war work of a hospital.

The V.A.D. Hospital

Whatever plans may be made for the future of the Hostel we may be sure that nothing could have given greater satisfaction to the Founder than the use to which it has been put during the War. The distinction of an M.B.E. which has been awarded to the Commandant is a compliment to the Hospital as well as an honour to herself, and all those who have unselfishly put their whole heart into the work have done service of which their relations may be proud, and for which the parish should be very grateful.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

“We hope shortly to turn our attention to the needs of French and Belgian Refugees”

One sewing group continued to help refugees even after the war was over.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Women’s Working Party maintains a good attendance on Wednesdays at 2.30. A final consignment of Hospital work has been received from Lady Munro’s Committee, and we hope shortly to turn our attention to the needs of French and Belgian Refugees.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Pigs scattered over Wargrave, Knowl Hill and Crazies Hill

When food was in increasingly short supply, some turned to keeping pigs.

The Wargrave Pig Club

The Annual Meeting was held on the 13th February. The Report and Balance Sheet were presented showing a balance on hand on 31st December last of £31 2s. 4d. The following is a copy of the Report:-

“The Wargrave Pig Club was formed at a meeting held in the Parish Room on 4th April, 1918, when the Officers and Committee for the year were elected. The membership has reached a total of 79, and at one time there were 290 pigs registered on the Club books.

The Parish Council gave permission for two rooms in the old District School buildings to be used as a store, and arrangements were made for members to attend there on Friday evenings to purchase pig food. The food has been procured by certificates issued by the Livestock Commissioner, and although there has sometimes been difficulty in getting the necessary quantity from the millers owing to the general shortage, there was only one week when millers’ offals were unobtainable. That however did not mean that the pigs were without food altogether, for, thanks to Mr. Bond generously advancing money with which to buy other kinds of pig food in large quantities, the Club had a good supply of unrationed pig meal in store, and the Committee were enabled to “carry on”. Altogether over 36 tons of feeding stuffs have been dealt with.

Mr. Bond has had erected at his own expense six capital sites on the Station Road Allotment ground which he has agreed to let to members of the Club at the low rent of 5s. a year. Five of these sites have been occupied. He also advanced money with which to purchase young pigs. 33 pigs have been so bought and resold to members at the actual cost price.

Sir William Cain provided the sum of £6 for prizes for the best bacon hog. Mr. A.B. Booth £3 3s., for porkers, and Mr. Bond £3 as extra prizes. Mr. Rose and Mr. A’Bear acted as judges, all the pigs being viewed in their own sites. The prizes were distributed at a meeting of the Club members on 3rd December.

The competing pigs being scattered over Wargrave, Knowl Hill and Crazies Hill, it occupied the judges the whole of one day for inspection. The Committee offer them their sincerest thanks for undertaking this work.

One of the objects of the Club is the insurance of pigs and although 27 members paid premiums, the Club only had one claim to settle.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

“An incalculable amount of pain, many limbs, and indeed many lives must have been saved by the timely arrival of the bales”

Wargrave had been at the heart of work providing surgical supplies during the war.

Wargrave Surgical Dressing Society

This Society, which has just brought its work to a close owed its existence to the energies of Miss Choate.

At Millward’s, generously lent by the late Mr. Henry Nicholl and recently by Major C.R.I. Nicholl, was started by her in March 1915, a work which grew to such an extent that during the four years some 500,000 dressings and comforts were dispatched to the wounded from Wargrave. These were not, of course, all made in the village. Under Miss Choate’s organisation, branches were started at Dartmouth, Ledbury, Loughton, Pangbourne, Peppard, Shiplake and Wimbledon, while welcome and regular parcels were received from Twyford, Kidmore and Hoylake. But all were packed for shipment and consigned from Wargrave.

The parcels went to Hospitals and Casualty Clearing Stations at almost every fighting area – to Mesopotamia, to Gallipoli, to Egypt, to Serbia and to American and Colonial Hospitals in England and in France.

It is impossible to ever estimate the value of the work. An incalculable amount of pain, many limbs, and indeed many lives must have been saved by the timely arrival of the bales. As a lame man said to the writer “Only we who are still suffering the effects of the shortage of medical comforts at the beginning of the war can appreciate fully the work these people have done.”

In the early days, consignments were sent in response to urgent appeals from Commandants and Matrons of Hospitals, but since 1916 the Society, in common with other of the larger Societies in England, has worked under the direction of the Department of the Director General of Voluntary Organisations at the War Office.

A.B.

A meeting of the Society and the subscribers was held on Wednesday, Feb. 5th, at Millwards to decide upon the disposal of the Balance in hand. Every provision had been made for carrying on the work through the winter if the war had continued, and the funds amounted to over £200.

In the absence of Capt. Bird, the Vicar was asked to take the chair. After a full discussion it was unanimously resolved that £200 be given to the Ward Fund and Recreation Fund of the Manor Hospital, Hampstead.

It was a great happiness to all concerned to feel that the money should benefit a work with which Miss Sinclair was so closely associated.

It was resolved that the remaining balance be given to the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, for a Care and Comforts Fund for the Soldier Patients.

The accounts have not yet been audited but it is expected that the amount to be given to Reading Hospital will be about £20.

These resolutions, together with the audited accounts, must be submitted to the Charity Commissioners for approval, but there is every reason to think that they will be endorsed by them.

The men in the Manor House Orthopedic Hospital, Hampstead, for discharged Soldiers and Sailors, wish to send their grateful thanks to the Members of the Surgical Dressing Emergency Society, Wargrave, for their splendid gift (£200) to be used for their Care and Comfort. As many Wargrave ladies have consented to be god-mothers in the wards, it is the wish of the men that some of them should be on the new Committee, called the Care and Comforts Committee, who from time to time will decide how the money shall be spent. The appreciation of the men is very touching in its sincerity and sense of sympathy.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)