Our sympathy goes out to the relatives and friends of these brave men

Many Reading families were affected by the war.

Notes from the Vicar
Intercessions list

Sick and Wounded: Lieut. Kibbly, Private Ernest James Wise.

Departed: Sergt. B Stevens, George Dix, Lieut, John Maurice, Lieut. Frederick Leslie Hedgcock, Private Horace William Tull. R.I.P.

Prisoner of War: Pte. R. Blake.

Our sympathy goes out to the relatives and friends of these brave men.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, November 1918 (D/P96/28A/35)

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Think seriously about praying for our country

All Saints’ District

We feel sure all our readers would wish to join us in offering our deepest sympathy to Admiral and Mrs. Fleet in the loss of their only child, Major Aylmer Louis Fleet; and also to Mr. Burnham in the loss of his only son Geo. Burnham. Both killed in action in France. – R.I.P.

S. Saviours District
R.I.P.

Amongst those who have lately laid down their lives for their country is Tom Downey, who lived with Mr. and Mrs. W. Wells, 77 Field Road, to whom we tender our sincere sympathy.

Alfred Frances Holder, who died on the 16th, was a discharged soldier and had been fighting against his sickness for a long time. His family have many who sympathize with them in their bereavement.

S. Marks District
War Intercessions

Is it not possible for some, who for various reasons have not made the effort to come and plead before the Throne of Grace, the needs of our Country and people, at the week-day War Intercession Wednesdays, 8 p.m., Fridays 3 p.m., to think seriously about this matter and come to at least one of these short services.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P98/28A/13)

Pray for Reading men

News of Reading men.

Notes from the Vicar

Intercessions list

Private George Palmer, Warwickshire Regiment; The Rev. Carey Cooper, C.F.; The Rev. Richard Alban Norris, C.F.

Prisoner
: Private A Bartlett.

Sick and Wounded: Private T. Tomkinson; A.M. Robert Bunting, R.A.F.

Departed: Privates Waters; William Neate; Mark Ewens; Pooley; George H. Hunt; Leslie H. Packer; Gunner G.W. Wall, R.F.A.; Harold Little.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P96/28A/35)

The symbol of victory

Victor Corden (1860-1939) was a Newbury based artist and teacher of art, who provided the decoration for a war shrine in Speenhamland Church.

Although we have always made a point of remembering our fighting men in various ways at our services, and they are mentioned by name in our war intercessions, yet it must often have seemed to many that there has been something wanting. We hope now that this feeling of a little coldness will be entirely removed through the generosity of a member of the congregation, who has made himself responsible for the erection of a War Shrine. It will be placed between the Vestry Door and the East Wall and will be of quite a simple character. There will be a background of some dark material, in front of which will be placed flags and palm-branches (the symbol of victory), if we can obtain them. In a centre will be a shield containing the names of those who have been killed in action belonging to the parish, and on a table in front of it will be a book with the names of the men from the parish who are engaged in various ways in His Majesty’s Forces. The shrine will supply a felt want, and we trust will be of much comfort to many who have friends fighting or a rest. We hope that it will lead to an increased feeling of devotion. We are much indebted to the generous donor, and to Mr. Victor Corden, who has kindly placed his artistic skill and experiences at our disposal in the matter.

Speenhamland parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P116B/28A/2)

Successes recently granted to our arms and those of our allies

There was news of Reading men.

Thanksgivings

For successes recently granted to our arms and those of our allies.

Intercessions

For Percival Baingent, one of our Altar-servers, who has joined up in the Royal Warwickshire Regt.

For Frank Taylor, our late Sacristan, who after serving in France and Ireland, has now gone to Italy.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, September 1918 (D/P98/28A/13)

Intercessions for Reading men

Notes from the Vicar

Intercessions List
: Private A.H. Gray, R.A.F.

Departed: Gunner Ernest H. Relf, Lieut, Howard M. Cook, Private Heard, Lce-Corpl. Cornelius Smith, R.E.

Missing: Private A. Bartlett.

Prisoner: Lieut. S. Jardine.

Wounded
: Lieut. Taylor.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, September 1918 (D/P96/28A/35)

Intercessions list

Reading churchgoers prayed for their men.

Intercessions List

Lieut. C.J. Grimes, R.E.

Prisoner: Lieut. F.R. Hill.

Departed: Sergt. Harold Willoughby.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, August 1918 (D/P96/28A/35)

We think of those who are sacrificing so much for the Country over which flies the flag of the free

St Peter’s Church in Furze Platt was adorned with flags – presumably Union Jacks.

Thanks.

We have to thank Mr Rogers for the two beautiful flags which are now hung in St Peter’s Church. They were dedicated by our Vicar on the Eve of St Peter’s Day during Evensong. We think as we look at them of those who are sacrificing so much for the Country over which flies the flag of the free. Let us at home not forget to come with our sacrifice of intercession for them.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, August 1918 (D/P181/28A/27)

The spiritual importance of the day

August
The Anniversary of the Declaration of War falls this year upon a Sunday, and special forms of Prayer and Intercession have been put forth by the Archbishops. These we shall make use of at the services on that day.

September
The services on August 4th were deeply impressive to all who took part in them. before the sung Eucharist, the congregation, preceded by the Churchwardens, were led in procession by the Priest and Choir to the Shrine outside. There prayers were offered both for the fallen and those on Service. It was a happy thought which suggested this short act of pilgrimage; it undoubtedly helped to mark the spiritual importance of the day. We owe it to a member of the congregation. We need not add how we Clergy welcome suggestions from our laity which may add life to the Service of the Master. Another member of the congregation had, too, the satisfaction of hearing her own tune and words used as an introit.

South Ascot Parochial Magazine, August and September 1918 (D/P186/28A/18)

“May this terrible war not last another year, but may the world be blest once more with peace, but this time for evermore”

Here is our diarists’ take on the war’s fourth anniversary:

Joan Daniels of Reading
August 4th Sunday

The fourth anniversary of the war & therefore Remembrance Day so Mummie, Elsie, Ruth & I went to church to intercession service.

May this terrible war not last another year, but may the world be blest once more with peace, but this time for evermore….

War news still splendid, we have now advanced 30 miles at some points.

Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey
4 August 1918

½ an hour too early for early church – then went again at 11. Nice little service – Intercessions to Russian hymn.

William Hallam of Swindon
4th August 1918

Wife & Marj. to St. Sav. at 8 to H.C. & I went to St Paul’s at XI.

F & L. went up to Lockinge at 3 o’clock.

To-night we had a cake for tea with currants in, the first time since before Xmas.

Diaries of Joan Daniels (D/EX1341/1); Florence Vansittart neale (D/EX73/3/17/8); and William Hallam (D/EX1415/25)

Our manifold necessities in the Great War

The Bishop’s Message

The following extracts are from the bishop’s message in the July Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the supply of our manifold necessities in the Great War.

For all the great sufferers in body, mind and estate.

For Russia and the Russian Church.

For Serbia and the Serbian Students among us.

For Ireland.

Earley St Peter parish magazine (D/P191/28A/25)

“More might spare time from the river or their gardens to pray for the brothers and fathers and friends, who in our defence have neither our pleasures, our comfort, nor our safety”

The vicar of Maidenhead found wartime bread substitutes were inappropriate for Holy Communion.

The Vicar’s Letter

Dear Friends and Parishioners,-

Ascension Day and Whit-Sunday have come to us in glorious weather, and we had satisfactory numbers of Communicants and good congregations. Both might have been rather better, for though well up to the level of other years, in this time of stress, I think more might spare time from the river or their gardens to pray for the brothers and fathers and friends, who in our defence have neither our pleasures, our comfort, nor our safety…

St Luke’s is going to ask for some extra donations to wipe off our deficit. Collections have been up in both churches, but the price of fuel, light, etc, has soared like an aeroplane…

Lastly, I have to ask for your consideration in a very delicate matter that needs reverent treatment. We are very fortunate in being able to get a special loaf of bread made for Church use, which is purer and whiter than the ordinary war bread. This, I hope, we shall always be able to get for Sundays, and we are much indebted for the trouble that has been taken by those who supply us with the bread. But frequently there are (in addition to Thursday) occasional week-day Celebrations. Sometimes I can arrange for a special loaf; sometimes it is difficult for me to do so. In these last cases, on week-days I propose to use wafer bread, made in squares that one can break, thus preserving the symbolism of the “One Loaf”. It is made of pure wheat, flour and water, and thus obeys the spirit of the rubric at the end of the Holy Communion Service. And there is no Scriptural or Church Warrant for the use of potato flour, etc, in church bread.

I must ask you to believe me when I say that I do it reluctantly, but I feel that in the circumstances the use of the very crumbly war bread makes devout persons of all schools of thought in the Church feel that something else should be secured that can be more easily and reverently divided. In France, I believe, the Army almost always uses wafer bread for the Holy Communion Service. No one attending the week-day Services will, I think, be made uncomfortable by the change; and old-fashioned people will not be disturbed by any change on Sunday as long as I can get a special loaf made.

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar
C.E.M. FRY

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, June 1918 (D/P181/28A/27)

“May his sacrifice not be in vain!”

There was sad news for many Reading families.

The Vicar’s Notes

Intercessions

Let us remember in our prayers all our fighting men, especially, among the prisoners, Alfred Standbridge, of Boarded Lane, one of our server; Roy Russell, of Minster Street; Walter Nunn of Hope Street (also wounded); Frank Thomas, of Lavender Street.

The Fallen, especially Norman Day, of Anstey Road (died of wounds); Arthur Walley, of Bartlett’s Cottages, killed in action on Easter Day; George Gardiner, Of Lavender Place (died from wounds).
R.I.P.

All Saints District
List of Men Serving in His Majesty’s forces

We shall be very grateful for additions or corrections to our list so that it may be kept up to date.

We offer our deepest sympathy to one of the oldest members of the choir, Mr Sales, on the loss of a second son. Percy Sales was well known in the district and will be much missed. – R.I.P.

We would also offer our deepest sympathy to Mrs. Austen Leigh and family on the death of her youngest son Acting Captain Arthur Alexander Austen Leigh who was killed in action on May 11th. – R.I.P.

S. Saviours District
R.I.P.

Frank Chard, an old S. Saviours lad, has laid down his life in France. He had served in the army for some time during the war and had only recently returned to the front after his marriage. We feel much with his wife and family who mourn his loss, and also with the army who have lost in him a good soldier. May his sacrifice not be in vain!


Lads Club

We are very sorry to hear that Bert Griffin is dangerously ill in hospital in France; we hope his slight improvement will be maintained. Ben Josey is still very ill. G. Mittam, W. Sawyer are slowly recovering from their wounds. L. Shipway has quite recovered and others who are in H.M.Forces are doing well.

Our Soldiers

Edward James Bonny and Frederick Hearn are prisoners and Charles and James Wayman are missing. William Jessy and Arthur Dye and George Ward are sick, and Tom Josey wounded. They need our prayers.

Sidesman

Mr George Wells has to rejoin the Army at the end of May, but tho’ we shall lose his faithful services for the time being, we shall count him as one of our S. Saviour’s Sidesmen, and one and all wish him well.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, June 1918 (D/P98/28A/13)

Intercessions list: Reading St Giles

Reading churchgoers were asked to pray for their men.


Intercessions List

Sick and wounded: Kenneth Baines, Private Edwin Ritchie.

Missing: Alfred Henry Douglas. Harold Willoughby, Privates George May, Harry Kirkby, and Pavey.

Prisoners: The Rev. H.A. Smith-Masters, C.F. Lieut Cuthbert J.W. Trendall, Private Ernest Rogers.

R.I.P.: Driver Walter Browning, Corporal Frederick Browning, Captain Noel Thornton, Privates Ware, Connell and Dowler, Lieut. Mervyn Trendell.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, June 1918 (D/P96/28A/35)

We can trust our brave soldiers absolutely and entirely

The vicar of Reading St Mary encouraged parishioners to pray for all involved in the war.

The Vicar’s Notes

We are now in the thick of the most terrific struggle in the history of the world. We can trust our brave soldiers absolutely and entirely; they are fighting with a magnificent spirit and courage that is the wonder and admiration of all. The point is that they should be able to trust us, the civilian population; a great deal of the issue of this battle depends on the moral and spiritual backbone of those who are here at home. We ought at this critical time to make our prayers a deeper and greater reality and so I am putting in front of our magazine this month some simple heads of intercession.

Let us pray for:
Our King, and all our leaders at home and at the front.
Our fighting men and those of our allies.
The wounded and the prisoners.
The fallen.
The doctors, nurses, stretcher-bearers, the chaplains, on or near the field of battle.
The people at home that may be steadfast and true.
For final victory and after victory, lasting peace.

S. Mary’s Church is open each day till 9 o’clock in the evening so as to give opportunities of quiet prayer and intercession in this time of need.

S. Saviour’s District
R.I.P.

It is with great sorrow that we have heard of the death of George Courtnell, our late esteemed Verger, and our hearty sympathy is with Mrs. Courtnell in her sad bereavement. He died in the Canadian hospital at Doullens, having been brought there with many other wounded at the beginning of the recent big battle in France, and was buried with military honours near there. He died as he had lived, trying to do his duty. He was a faithful servant of Christ, and a loyal worker and helper at S. Saviour’s.

Our deep sympathy is also with Mrs. Lane, who has for the second time been called to make the sacrifice of a son, Henry Paice having been recently killed in France. He leaves a widow and children, to whom also, as to his mother, we offer our sincere condolence.

S. Mark’s District
R.I.P.

It is with sincere regret that we have to record the death of George Martin, one of our old S. Mark’s choir boys. He met with a very serious accident some six months ago, while engaged in the service of his country, from which he never recovered and passed away in the Royal Berkshire Hospital on April the 8th. He was most wonderfully patient and cheerful through all his illness. We offer his parents and sisters our sincere sympathy.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, May 1918 (D/P98/28A/13)