A house-to-house collection should be made at once

There was some progress with Winkfield’s war memorial plans.

THE WAR MEMORIAL

Another Public Meeting was held on June 26th, when the attendance was very poor. The Secretary reported that it had been found impossible to find a suitable site on which to move and add to the present Men’s Club Room as the only suitable land was not for sale; also the Y.M.C.A. could be of no help.

After some discussion, it was resolved that enquiries should be made as to the possibility of buying the land on which the present club room stands, with a view to enlarging this, and that there ought to be no longer delay in appealing funds. It was therefore decided that a house-to-house collection should be made at once to raise funds for putting up a Memorial Brass in the Church, and also to buy if possible the site of the Men’s Club Room in Winkfield Row, and the Caretaker’s cottage, with a view to enlarging the Club Room into a Parish Institute.

The estimated cost is about £600, and if the funds raised should not suffice, the question of the disposal of any surplus after the Brass has been erected, will be put before a meeting of the subscribers.

Since the meeting, it has been ascertained that the property required can be bought for £300.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/8)

We should cherish the memory of those who had laid down their lives to protect us

WE have lost in the war a large number of men who were educated in our Parish Schools, and it was felt it would be fitting that their names should be inscribed on a Roll of Honour to be hung in the Schools as a Memorial.

Mrs. Daubeny very kindly undertook the work, and on May 30th, brought a framed Roll of Honour, beautifully illuminated by herself, and presented it to the School in the presence of the Managers, some parents and other friends.

In well chosen words Mrs. Daubeny made it clear to the children why we should cherish the memory of those who had laid down their lives to protect us, and how their example should always be a srimilis…, and their names and brave self-sacrifice never be forgotten.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/7)

Lack of power to raise the requisite funds

Winkfield considered the options for a memorial.

The War Memorial Committee met on May 15th at the Working Men’s Club, and the various matters referred to the Committee at the last Public Meeting were discussed.

It was felt that lack of power to raise the requisite funds would preclude any idea of providing and equipping a Recreation Ground, but that it might be possible, provided a suitable site could be found and purchased, to raise funds enough to move and add to the present Men’s Club Room and make it, with perhaps the help of the Y.M.C.A. or the Church Army, a Village Institute and Social Club.

Pending enquiries as to this, it was resolved to leave open for the time being the alternative questions of the erection of a Memorial Cross, or the naming of a bed at the Ascot Nursing Home.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/6)

A brass recording the Names, Rank and Regiment of men in the Parish who had fallen in the war

The Winkfield war memorial might take two parts.

PARISH WAR MEMORIAL

A second public Meeting was held in the Parish Room, on April 7th, at 7 p.m., to hear the report of the Committee, and there was a good attendance.

It was unanimously agreed that a brass be put up in the Church recording the Names, Rank and Regiment of men in the Parish who had fallen in the war, and a design submitted by Messrs. Maile & Son, at an estimated cost of £60, was approved.

Plans and estimates for the improvement of the Parish Room were discussed but it was proposed and carried that these should be abandoned.

Discussion then took place on the following suggestions:-

1. The erection of a Village Memorial Cross.
2. Providing and equipping a Recreation Ground.
3. Endowing or naming a bed at the Ascot Nursing Home.

No decision was come to, but Messrs. Berry, Bailey, W. Church and D Thurmer, were elected additional members of the Committee, and it was decided that the Committee should go into the points raised and submit their conclusions to another Public Meeting, to be called later. The proceedings terminated with a vote of thanks to the Vicar for presiding.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/5)

We have been glad to welcome them home

The men and women who had served the country began to return home.

A large number of our Service men have now been demobilised and we have been glad to welcome home recently, Sergeant Major Edwin Gray, Corporals A. Brown and W. Reed, and Privates A. Beal. Ed. Brant. F. Brant. H. Brant, H. Hoptroff, G. Higgs, A. Clayton, E. Culley, D. Knight, Smith, C. Streamer, S. Thurmer, R. Thurmer, C. Taylor, C. Reed. T. Wetherhall.

Ptes. Streamer and Hoptrodd we understand have elected to join the new army.

We beg to congratulate Quarter Master Sargeant H. R. Oatway on gaining the M.S.M., and Sister Constance Druce on the honour of being mentioned in despatches.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/3)

A good moon

The Winkfield war memorial was under consideration.

February

PARISH MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN.

A Public Meeting to discuss ideas and plans for erecting a suitable Memorial for Winkfield men who have died in the war, will be held in the Parish Room, on Wednesday, Feb. 12th, at 8 p.m.

There should be a good moon on that night, and we hope it will be a fine evening, and that as many as possible will attend.

March

PARISH MEMORIAL OF THE FALLEN

Notice of a Public Meeting to be held in the Parish Room, on Wednesday, Feb. 12th, in order to discuss ideas and plans for erecting a suitable memorial for Winkfield men, who have died in the freat war, was given in the February number of the Magazine; but unfortunately was printed so late that only a few received it in time to learn of the meeting, and the attendance was small.

The following resolutions were however unanimously passed:

(1.) That this meeting cordially approves the suggestion for a worthy and permanent memorial for the men of Winkfield who have made the supreme sacrifice during the War.

(2.) That whatever else may be done, a brass Memorial Tablet, inscribed with the names of Winkfield men who have fallen in the War should be set up in the Church.

Discussions took place as to the best form any further memorial should take, and three ideas was mooted.

(a.) That a Memorial Cross should be erected opposite the lych gate of the churchyard.

(b.) That the Parish Room should be improved and made more adaptable for meetings, entertainments, and all purposes of a village Institute.

(c.) That this parish should join with others in helping to enlarge the Ascot Cottage Hospital which is a great benefit to the District.

A Committee consisting of the Vicar and Wardens, Lord George Pratt and Messrs. S. G. Asher, and G. Brown and H. Harrison, was appointed to fully consider these proposals in all their bearings, and then to report to a public meeting to be called later.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February-March 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/2)

PoWs weak and run down

Imprisonment was an ordeal.

XMAS PRESENT FUND FOR WINKFIELD MEN ON SERVICE.

The appeal for this fund met with a hearty response, the amount raised was £22 8s. 5d.. and nearly every family in the parish contributed.

The Vicar has received many letters and cards from the men, expressing great appreciation of the remembrance of them.

It was a great pleasure to welcome home this month two more of the prisoners of war. Fred Johnson and Fred Blau. Both showed the effects of what they had undergone, and arrived home weak and run down, but with home comforts we hope it will not be long before they completely recover their health and strength.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/2)

In a prisoners’ hospital in Germany

Some PoWs were in a bad state.

We are glad to welcome home John Tidy, Richard Taylor and Percy Huxford, who have been prisoners of war, and to hear that Arthur Francis and Ben Ferns have arrived in England, though they are at present in hospital. Mrs. Ednie has heard that her son Victor is in a prisoners’ hospital in Germany, but he is expected to be moved home soon.

Winkfield District Magazine, January 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11)

“They all bring the same report of ill treatment, suffering and semi-starvation, which makes the blood boil and raises the strong desire that a stern reckoning should be paid for such brutality”

Released PoWs had a tale to tell.

We rejoice to welcome home in time for Xmas, four of our Prisoners of War, C. Brant, W. Harwood, R. Mitchell, and F. Onion. They all bring the same report of ill treatment, suffering and semi-starvation, which makes the blood boil and raises the strong desire that a stern reckoning should be paid for such brutality.

We shall naturally wish to erect a parish memorial to those Winkfield men who have given their lives for their country in this War, and as this concerns all in the parish, it is proposed shortly to call a Public Meeting in the Parish Room, to discuss plans and particulars. Probably the meeting will be held towards the end of January, and due notice of it will be given.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, January 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11)

The new year opens bright with hope, like a glorious morning after the night of darkness and storm

Churchgoers in Warfield and Winkfield rejoiced.

Warfield

It is suggested by the Archbishops that special thanksgiving for Victory, and special prayer for the statesmen of the world assembled in the Peace Conference, should be offered on the first Sunday in the new year, January 5th. The new year opens bright with hope, like a glorious morning after the night of darkness and storm. Clouds are still in the sky, but they are broken and the sun shines through. May we render thanks and glory to God in the Highest; and pray Him to inspire men with His own Spirit of Good-will, for good-will alone can bring true and lasting peace to homes, to nations and to all mankind.

It is hoped to hold a meeting during January, to consider the raising of a War Memorial in the Parish.

Winkfield

On the first Sunday, (January 5th) in the new year, which we trust will bring us the blessing of a just and lasting Peace, it is indeed fitting that we should join with other parishes all over the land in special Thanksgivings for Victory and deliverance from our enemies, and also pray specially for our Rulers and the Statesmen of the world, that the coming Peace Conference they may be enabled to lay the foundation of the effective establishment of a League of Nations which will prevent the horrors of war in the future.

Winkfield District Magazine, January 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11)

Our children have risen well to this opportunity of helping our soldiers and country

BLACKBERRY PICKING

We are glad to be able to report that our children have risen well to this opportunity of helping our soldiers and country, and already 192 pounds have been delivered to Miss Brown, School House, and collected by Mr. Yorke. We congratulate Miss Brown on the success on her effort to Leonard Fruel (altered by hand to Finch) who picked 41 pounds, Daisy Ven (altered by hand to New) 39 pounds, and Ella Giles 25 pounds; and we hope that they and the other children will continue their work as much as weather permits, this month.

We were glad to welcome home on leave, this month, Pte. Frank Brant who, in spite of his recent long illness, seemed very fit and well, and was married during his leave. We wish him every happiness in his wedded life.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1918 (D/P151/28A/10/9)

Trench fever and training

Mixed news for Winkfield families.

We are very glad to be able to report that the parents of Pte. Cecil Brant have had their anxiety lessened by the news that he is a prisoner of war in Germany; they have also now had a card from him saying that he is well, and unwounded.

We congratulate Captain Forster Maynard on his promotion to Major R.A.F.

Sergeant Leonard Tipper has been ill with trench fever but is now convalescent, and about to begin his training in England for commission.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/8)

In view of the fruit shortage, it is very important this year that as many blackberries as possible should be picked

BLACKBERRY PICKING

In view of the fruit shortage, it is very important this year that as many blackberries as possible should be picked. Here is an opportunity for our children to do their bit, and we hope they will do their best. The blackberries should be taken to Miss Brown School House, by Mr. Yorke, and taken to Bracknell on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and 3d. per pint will be paid to the gatherers.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/8)

Unwounded and well

Winkfield families continued to worry for loved ones.

Our deep sympathy goes out to Mr. and Mrs. T. Brant, whose son Cecil, (East Yorks Regiment), has been missing since the end of May, and we earnestly hope that it will not be long before their anxiety is relieved by hearing news of him.

We are glad to be able to report that the parents of Pte. Robert Mitchell have had their anxiety lessened by hearing that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, unwounded and well.

We are glad to say that Pte. Charles Reed is now convalescent and has lately been at home on leave.

Privates Charles Stone and Ernest Harmsworth have joined His Majesty’s Forces.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, August 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/7)

Earnest supplication that the righteous cause for which we have made such heavy sacrifices may be speedily crowned with victory, and a just and lasting Peace come quickly.

Churches in the Bracknell area commemorated the fourth anniversry of the start of the war.

August

Ascot

SUNDAY, August 4th, will be the fourth anniversary of the Declaration of War, and special forms of Prayer and Thanksgiving will be used throughout the Country on that day. The hours of service at All Saints’ will be as usual.

Bracknell

THE WAR – On Sunday, August 4th, when we shall enter on the fifth year of the War, we are called to come together to seek for God’s help and guidance, and to offer our thanksgivings for the success that has been granted to our efforts. The services will be at the usual hours, but will be of a special character. It can hardly be necessary to urge that there should be a large attendance. We need God’s continued help, and we must seek for it by persistent prayer. The collections at all the services will be for the British Red Cross Society.

Warfield

On Sunday, August 4th, the fourth anniversary of the Declaration of War, there will be celebrations of the Holy Communion at 7, 8, and 12 o’clock. Morning Prayer and Intercession Service for Children at 3. Evening Prayer, Intercession, reading of the Roll of Honour, and Sermon at 6.30. May we, like the good king Hezekiah of old, go up unto the house of the Lord, at this great crisis in our nation’s life, and spread out our cause, our troubles and anxieties, national and personal before the Lord.

Winkfield

For the first time, the 4th of August, the anniversary of the beginning of the War falls on a Sunday. The government have decided against a week day commemoration, so that the whole nation, it is hoped, will observe the occasion as a day of National Intercession to God on behalf of our country, with earnest supplication that the righteous cause for which we have made such heavy sacrifices may be speedily crowned with victory, and a just and lasting Peace come quickly.

We earnestly hope that this parish will respond, as never before, and that no family will be unrepresented in this parish church on such an occasion, when, as our Prime Minister writes:

“It is fitting that the nation should remembering the services of the men who are fighting for the preservation of civilisation, and should once more reconsecrate itself to the high ideals for the attainment of which the Allied Nations have sacrificed so much”.

The names of all our men serving at the front will be read out and commended to God in prayer, and the offertories at all the services will be devoted to fund helping to send comforts to Winkfield men now prisoners of war in Germany.

September

Bracknell

THE WAR – The Services held in August 4th – the fourth anniversary of the commencement of the War – were well attended. There were many communicants, and the church was really full, both at 11 and 6.30. The special services were used, and seemed to strike the right nore, as the services were specially earnest and reverent. The good news of the Allies’ successes deepened the feeling of thankfulness and hope in all hearts. £21 18s. was collected for the Red Cross and Prisoners of War Fund.

Cranbourne

WAR ANNIVERSARY — The services on August 4th were well attended, especially in the evening. The collections were for the Prisoners of War Fund, and amounted to £11 10s. 6d.

Warfield

It was a great pleasure to see such splendid congregations and above all so many communicants, on Sunday, August 4th, the fourth anniversary of the Declaration of War. In the evening the body of the church was quite full, and the congregation joined most heartily and earnestly in the service. The collection £6 9s. 7d. was in aid of the parochial fund for providing parcels for prisoners of war, of which Mrs. Wood is secretary.

Winkfield

The services on August 4th were well attended, especially in the evening. The offertories for Prisoners of War amounted to £12 10s and on the following Sunday £7 was raised for the Mission to Seamen.


Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, August and September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/7-8)