Damage caused by the continual trial trips of the instructional lorries of the Royal Flying Corps

The air war was causing problems on roads back home in Berkshire.

MILITARY REQUISITIONS

Road over Swinford Bridge

A military requisition has been issued for the repairs to the road over Swinford Bridge carrying the brick traffic from Chawley Works to the Oxfordshire Aerodromes. The road belongs to Lord Abingdon and is in a bad state of repair. As Lord Abingdon is unable, owing to lack of labour and materials, to do the work, the Committee have – at the request of the Road Board – undertaken the repairs, and an estimate of the cost has been forwarded to the Finance Committee.

MILITARY TRAFFIC: Damage to roads
Extraordinary military traffic, Ascot and Windsor Road

Damage has been caused by extraordinary military traffic between Lovel Road and “The Squirrel” by the continual trial trips of the instructional lorries of the Royal Flying Corps stationed at Ascot, and damage was also done in Hatchet Lane. The lorries have since left…. Owing to this damage the amount of last year’s estimate for the repairs to the whole of this road has been increased by £1,640.

Berkshire County Council Highways and Bridges Committee report, 20 April 1918 (C/CL/C1/1/21)

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This year we have got to produce as much food as we possibly can

Winkfield continued to support the troops in various ways.

THE PAROCHIAL WAR COMMITTEE

It is now nearly a year since the War Savings Branch was started. The first Certificate was purchased on April 18th, 1917, and up to date 171, representing £132 10s. 6d. have been purchased and 138 have been taken up.

The Committee are anxious to encourage the spraying of potatoes again this season. The potato crop is of more vital importance than ever this year; we have got to produce as much food as we possibly can and it is our bounden duty to study the subject and get as heavy crops as possible. The potato is the king of vegetables and all other garden crops should be second to it, but every possible step must be taken to guard against disease, and therefore all potatoes should be properly sprayed, for if this is done the crops will be heavier and the disease less prevalent.

Thanks to Mr. Achser’s generosity we have a spraying machine for use in the parish, so the only expense will be chemicals and labour; but as there will be a great demand for the Burgundy spraying mixture orders ought to be given without delay, and since before ordering the Committee must know approximately the quantity required, those who would like their crops sprayed are asked to inform Mr. C. Osman or some member of the Committee, at once.

Miss Hershel is about to revise the Roll of Honour and will be glad to receive information of the name, regiment, and date of enlistment of those who have joined since January 1917, and also of any other changes that may be needful in the roll.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, April 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/4)

Till we meet again

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING

Private Charles Holloway has long been reported missing, and the War Office has now sent an intimation that he must be “assumed killed in action.” Our deep sympathy is with his widow, and his parents, who have now lost three sons in this war.

Lance-Corporal Leonard Cox has been wounded and is now in hospital in England and is progressing favourably.

We were glad to welcome home on leave this month Privates Broadbent, F. Johnson, and J. Sumner.

The Vicar has received the sum of £1 from sale of waste paper collected in the parish, and this money has been devoted to providing comforts for our two prisoners of war in Germany, Privates W. Harwood and F. Onion.

We hope to send to all our men who are serving an Easter card of greeting with the message “May the Risen Christ, who left His home for us, have you in His keeping till we meet again”; and the assurance that we shall be remembering them at our Easter Communion.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)

On leave just before going to the Front, though well over military age

Winkfield men continued to serve – even the more mature who were not liable for conscription.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We much regret to report the death of Private William Tomlinson who died from wounds received in action, and we tender our deep sympathy to his relatives in Winkfield.

We are sorry to have to report that Privates W. Harwood and F. Onion are prisoners of war in Germany.

We are glad to welcome home on leave this month Private J. Winnen, M.M., Lance Corporal F. Beal, Private A. Beal, and Private E. Nicholas. The latter, though well over military age, was on leave just before going to the Front.

We have recived a large number of letters of thanks from our men for their Christmas parcels. All were pleased that they had not been forgotten by friends at home.

On January 6th, the Day of National Prayer, the congregations were good. The offertories, amounting to £10, were given to the Red Cross Prisoners of War Fund.


Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, February 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10)

Every man, woman, and child should subscribe 1d. a day to help the King and the Country to beat the enemy and gain victory and a lasting, good peace

Cranbourne people were urged to contribute financially.

On the 1st of February the Munition Works, Spital, Windsor, War Savings Association completed the first year. As so many residents of Cranbourne and Winkfield are subscribers, it may interest them to hear that 14,353 sixpenny coupons have been collected during the year, representing a sum of £358 16s. 6d. paid into the Treasury, London, for war services. Members are urged to press and invite others to subscribe and support the good cause. Every man, woman, and child should subscribe 1d. a day or 6d. per week to help the King and the Country to beat the enemy and gain victory and a lasting, good peace. No one should hesitate, but join at once; and remember, every penny lent to the Government helps in the long run to win the war.

Mr. Lenoard Creasy, of Hurstleigh, Windosr Forest, will be glad to furnish all particulars to any one who wishes to subscribe to the National War Savings Fund.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)

Two more of our men killed in action

News of Winkfield men.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We have this month to mourn the loss of two more of our men killed in action, Captain Godfrey Loyd and Lance-Corporal Reginald Knight, and our deep sympathy goes out to their bereaved families.

Corporal E.H. Harris has been seriously wounded in three places, and Pte. A.E. Fletcher has been severely wounded in the leg. Both are in hospital in England and progressing favourably.

Pte. Albert Carter is also in hospital in England and is going on well.

Corporal R. Nickless is now in England and we congratulate hm on being chosen for training for a commission.

We are glad to welcome home on leave this month Corporal Ernest Gray, and Privates G. Higgs and Francis Webb: also Alec Knight and Karl Brant who have just been appointed to a ship.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, January 1918 (D/P 151/281/10)

The great cause for which we are fighting – the cause of liberty, justice, peace and the fellowship of nations

Churches in the Bracknell area joined in the National Day of Intercession.

Ascot

Sunday, January 6th (The Epiphany) has been appointed as a day of Special Prayer for the War and the alms at all services will be for the Red Cross Fund.


Bracknell

‘THE WAR.—In accordance with the King’s Proclamation the first Sunday in the New Year, January 6th,the Feast of the Epiphany, will be observed as a special day of Prayer and Thanksgiving in Bracknell. The services in the Church will be held at the usual hours, but special forms of prayer will be used, and every one who desires to seek the help of God in these anxious times should make a point of being present. The collections will be given to the Red Cross Society.

Cranbourne

THE DAY OF NATIONAL PRAYER.
As we all know, the 1st Sunday in the New Year has been appointed as a “Day for Intercession on behalf of the Nation and Empire in this Time of War.” There will be celebrations of the Holy Communion as 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Special forms of Prayer and Thanksgiving have been issued under the authority of the Archbishops of Canterbury and York and will be used at our services. January 6th is the Feast of the Epiphany. The idea of the Epiphany is the manifestation of God among all nations nations, and our Bishop has pointed out “how deeply we stand in need of such a manifestation to day, and how “the great cause for which we are fighting – the cause of liberty, justice, peace and the fellowship of nations – would truly, if it were realised, be a manifestation of God, and a preperation for the Kingdom of Christ, for which our most earnest and constant prayers are needed.

It is to be hoped that, whatever the weather is, none of us will be absent from the services on January 6th, but that we shall, as a Parish kneel before the Throne of Grace and offer up our petitions to Him who judges the peoples of the world, and is our only refuge and strength, and a very present help in time of trouble.

Winkfield

VICAR’s LETTER.

My Dear Friends,

Once again the New Year will find us in the midst of the horrors of war, and in our King’s words, “this world wide struggle for the triumph of right and liberty is entering on its last and most difficult phase when we shall need our courage fortified to face the sacrifices we may yet hace to make before our work is done.”

Very justly does the King call upon all his people to make the first Sunday of the New Year a Day of special Prayer and Thanksgiving, a day of National Intercession to Gon on Behalf of our Country, for the great casuse of rightousness entrusted to us, and for the men (so many of them near and dear to us in Winkfield) who are fighting for it on sea and land.

We all long for a victorious Peace, but can we expect that almighty God will, as a matter of course, give it us, if we do not think it worth while to ask Him for it by humble and united Public Prayer; for until we, as a whole Nation, realise our need od something more that material force, we do not deserve to win.

It is then a real patriotic duty for every man and woman to attend their Parish Church on January 6th and take their part in this National wave of Intercession. Our Sailors and Soldiers have a right to expect our prayers; and the help and co-operation of those who seldom or never go to Church or Chapel is specially asked on this great and solemn occasion.

I can only solemnly repeat what I wrote last year that I should not like to have on my own conscience the responsibility which that man or woman takes who could help their Country by joining in this movement, and yet is too careless and indifferent to do so.

If you belevie in God, and have any love for your Country, come and help.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H.M. Maynard

The Services on January 6th will be:

8 a.m., Holy Communion.
11 a.m. Service and Holy Communion.
6.30 p.m. Special Intercession Service (copies of which will be provided.)

Bracknell, February

The Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving in connection with the War on January 6th was fairly well kept in Bracknell. The congregations were larger than usual in the morning and evening, and in the afternoon a considerably number of people attended the special service. The weather was bad and hindered some who would have wished to be present, but it was a little disappointing not to have had quite crowded congregations on such a day.

Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, January 1918 (D/P 151/281/10)

The various reasons for the present food shortage, and the urgent for all honorably to keeep well within the Food Controller’s allowance

The League of National Safety encouraged people to cooperate with rationing and food saving schemes.

A public meeting in connection with the Food Economy Campaign was held in the Parish Room on Dec. 19th at 3 o’clock, with Mr C.A. Ferard in the chair.

We wish the attendance had been larger, for a Lady deputation from the Food Controller’s Department gave a most clear and forcible address on the various reasons for the present food shortage, and the urgent for all honorably to keeep well within the Food Controller’s allowance.

The Vicar proposed a hearty vote of thanks to the lady and at the close of the meeting many enrolled themselves as members of the League of National Safety, pledged to follow out the ration instructions and do all in their power to asist the campaign for National Safety.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, January 1918 (D/P 151/281/10)

Chosen to go to America to train men there in “sniping”

A local man was picked to train American recruits.

Warfield

Pte. A. Beal and J. Harwood have recently joined His Majesty’s Forces.

We were glad to welcome home on leave this month Privates L. Cox, F. Fancourt, N. Nickless, T. Nickless, G. Nichols, H. Ottaway, A. Shefford, also A. Cartland, who has just obtained a commission in the R.F.C., and who we heartily congratulate.

We congratulate Corporal Edwin Gray on his promotion to Sergeant and on the fact he has been chosen to go to America to train men there in “sniping.” Sergt. Gray began his career as a marksman at the Winkfield Miniature Rifle Range.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/12)

By reason of the war there are great difficulties in the railway transport of coal

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries it was common for parishes to set up voluntary societies where people on low wages paid in over the year and then could draw on the fund to purchase seasonal goods like winter fuel, thus spreading the cost through the year.

WINKFIELD FUEL FUND.

The Trustees have accepted the tender of Messrs. Drake & Mount, Ltd. The same quantity of coal will be distributed as last year, and, if possible by two deliveries. As by reason of the war there are great difficulties in the railway transport of coal, depositors must bear with patience any necessary delay in delivery. Messrs Drake & Mount may be relied upon to do their best in the difficult circumstances with which they have to contend.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/12)

“His machine nose dived to what seemed certain death”

There were varying fortunes for the men of Winkfield.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private Charles Mitchell, who we much regret to record was killed in action on October 11th. He was only 19, and had been at the front but a few weeks. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, November 11th, at 6.30 at the Parish Church , when we have no doubt that many will show their sympathy by attending.

Stoker Karl Brant has been very ill with pneumonia but is now convalescent and home on leave.

Private Fred Fancourt has been wounded in the face; he is in Hospital in France and is doing well.

Flight Commander Foster Maynard met with an aeroplane accident which nearly cost him his life. It is reported that when flying, through some mishap, his machine nose dived to what seemed certain death, when it was held up by some branches and he sustained many cuts about the head and a badly broken arm, but is now doing well in hospital.

Private Albert Carter is ill with trench fever, he is in hospital in England and we hope progressing favourably.

We are glad to learn that Private John Carter who had a very long and serious illness, is now convalescent, also Private George Streamer is now almost recovered and able to take up light duty in Ireland.

Private William Burt has been invalided out of the Amy, the chronic nephritis from which he is suffering being brought on by the exposure and hardships of the trenches. He is much better now and will we trust in time get quite strong again.

We congratulate Sergeant Henry Oatway on his promotion to Sergeant-Major in the Engineers.

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS TO OUR MEN.

We have always remembered the Sailors and Soldiers from our Parish at Christmas, and sent them small Christmas gifts which they have greatly appreciated. Mrs. Maynard raised the fund for doing this last Christmas and the Christmas before by means of a rummage sale, but this cannot be managed this year and so we must fall back on the subscriptions as in 1914, but I am sure that we shall feel it a privilege to do our share in bringing some Christmas cheer to the men to whom we owe so much. About £15 will be required.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/11)

Delays in forms for war allowances

Administrative red tape and confusion over parish boundaries caused problems for some families.

It often happens that a delay occurs in attending to the many forms, which have to be filled up in connection with Soldiers’ allowances, pensions, &c., owing to persons giving “Winkfield” as their Parish. “Winkfield” is the proper Postal address, but for persons living in this Parish it should be stated that they live in the Parish of Cranbourne, and not Winkfield.

Privates P. Wye, F. Douglas, and H. Edmonds have been home on leave. We hear that Stanley Stratfull has been made a Corporal.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/10)

“The return to the hell of war must be to our brave fellows a terrible wrench, far more than going out for the first time”

Winkfield men received a sympathetic hearing on their rare visits home on leave.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We regret to report that Pte. George Streamer has been very badly gassed and is now in Hospital in England. It is feared that he may be invalided out of the Army; his sight is badly affected.

Pte. Frank Brant has been seriously ill for several weeks. He is hospital in France and we trust that the anxiety of his relatives will still be relieved.

Pte. James Winnen has been suffering severely from shell-shock, but is now convalescent.

We are glad to welcome home on leave this month Lance-Corporal Edwin Gary, who recently won the Military Medal, Lance-Corporal Hartly Golding, and Privates G. Chaney, W. Harwood, W. Fisher and N. Town.

After the peace and quietness of a few days at home, the return to the hell of war must be to our brave fellows a terrible wrench, far more than going out for the first time. May they have a very real place in our gratitude and prayers.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/10)

“We are proud of the patriotism he has shown”

A middle aged dad from Winkfield whose son had been killed decided to join up himself.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Pte. Fred Blay, who only recently went out to France, has, we regret to learn, been badly gassed and complications of bronchitis and inflammation have ensued. He is now in Hospital in England and going on as well as can be expected.

Pte. E.C. Nichols has lately joined the M.T.A.S.C. As his age is 46 he is the veteran of our parish. We are proud of the patriotism he has shown and sympathise deeply with him and his family in the recent loss of the eldest son George.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/9)

Boating and tea for the Red Cross Working Party

There were occasional perks to making clothes and bandages for the wounded.

During Mrs. Ferard’s absence from home a good many members of her Red Cross Working Party have been bringing their work to S. Ronans, and over 300 articles have been made.

On September 8th, Miss Thackrah very kindly gave tea to a party of about 30 workers. It was a lovely day and they were able to have tea in the open air and afterwards to boat on the lake and enjoy the beauties of the garden.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/10)