Lavender Day

Ascot parishioners were asked to contribute lavender from their gardens in a novel fundaising idea.

The Parade Service of the R.A.F. now takes place in the Church at 9, instead of in the Cinema.

‘There will be a “Lavender Day” on July 20th in aid of the Five “Ascot” beds with the Scottish Women’s Hospitals in France, Corsica and Salonika, and the Berkshire War Prisoners’ Fund. Gifts of Lavender, fresh or dried, will be gratefully received by Miss Hanbury at Holmwood least a few Lavender bushes, and the smallest quantity will be welcome if sent promptly.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers Committee have been distributing the printed Cards, mentioned in our last issue, for relatives to post to men serving abroad. If any have not yet received a card in a stamped envelope ready to be addressed and sent along with an ordinary letter, they should apply at once to the member of the Committee in charge of their district as follows:

High Street – A.F. Bullock
H. Woods
London Road – H. Goswell
Fernbank Road – H.Tustin
Seinley and Priory Road – J. Skelton
New Road – H. Charman
A. Morton
Kennel Ride – A.Woods

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

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We can trust our brave soldiers absolutely and entirely

The vicar of Reading St Mary encouraged parishioners to pray for all involved in the war.

The Vicar’s Notes

We are now in the thick of the most terrific struggle in the history of the world. We can trust our brave soldiers absolutely and entirely; they are fighting with a magnificent spirit and courage that is the wonder and admiration of all. The point is that they should be able to trust us, the civilian population; a great deal of the issue of this battle depends on the moral and spiritual backbone of those who are here at home. We ought at this critical time to make our prayers a deeper and greater reality and so I am putting in front of our magazine this month some simple heads of intercession.

Let us pray for:
Our King, and all our leaders at home and at the front.
Our fighting men and those of our allies.
The wounded and the prisoners.
The fallen.
The doctors, nurses, stretcher-bearers, the chaplains, on or near the field of battle.
The people at home that may be steadfast and true.
For final victory and after victory, lasting peace.

S. Mary’s Church is open each day till 9 o’clock in the evening so as to give opportunities of quiet prayer and intercession in this time of need.

S. Saviour’s District
R.I.P.

It is with great sorrow that we have heard of the death of George Courtnell, our late esteemed Verger, and our hearty sympathy is with Mrs. Courtnell in her sad bereavement. He died in the Canadian hospital at Doullens, having been brought there with many other wounded at the beginning of the recent big battle in France, and was buried with military honours near there. He died as he had lived, trying to do his duty. He was a faithful servant of Christ, and a loyal worker and helper at S. Saviour’s.

Our deep sympathy is also with Mrs. Lane, who has for the second time been called to make the sacrifice of a son, Henry Paice having been recently killed in France. He leaves a widow and children, to whom also, as to his mother, we offer our sincere condolence.

S. Mark’s District
R.I.P.

It is with sincere regret that we have to record the death of George Martin, one of our old S. Mark’s choir boys. He met with a very serious accident some six months ago, while engaged in the service of his country, from which he never recovered and passed away in the Royal Berkshire Hospital on April the 8th. He was most wonderfully patient and cheerful through all his illness. We offer his parents and sisters our sincere sympathy.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, May 1918 (D/P98/28A/13)

Parcels for prisoners

New restrictions made it harder to support PoWs in Germany.

ASCOT PARISH Prisoners of War Fund

On account of the new regulations in regard to the despatch of parcels to British Prisoners of War, it has become necessary to close this Fund. Happily, up to the present only two Ascot men have been taken prisoners, both of whom belong to the Berkshire Regiment. This Regiment has entirely adopted them, though arrangements have been also made whereby the parents in each case are still able to send parcels to their sons in their own name, through the Regimental Fund. With the consent of the subscribers to our fund, the balance in hand, £3 2s. 4d., has been sent to the Berkshire Regiment Prisoners of War Relief Fund, in acknowledgement of their generous treatment of our two Ascot lads. Our thanks are due to the kind donors and subscribers to this Fund during the past year.

THE CHRISTMAS SALE, in aid of the two “Ascot Beds” (French and Serbian Womens’ Hospitals) will be held at the South Ascot Parish Hall on Wednesday, December 6th. The Sale will be opened at 2.30p.m. by Countess Roberts.

Christmas Tree. Bran Pies. Admission, 2.30-5.30p.m., 6d. After 5.30, admission free. Tea, 6d.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1916 (D/P151/28A/12)

Money for war work

Wokingham parishioners donated funds to help PoWs as well as the ongoing work making clothes and medical supplies for wounded soldiers.

War Work Fund.
Balance in hand, October, 1916 £1 12 9
Donations, to May, 1917 £22 11 9
£24 4 6

This has now all been expended in the materials for the articles specified last month.

Royal Berks Regiment Prisoners of War Fund.
In addition to the sum given in Church, £3 18s. 5d. was collected, making a total of £6. 16s. 1d., for this Fund.

Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P154C/28A/1)

Tinned food for Berkshire prisoners of war

During the First World War, prisoners of war were not treated quite as well as they would be today. Food and clothing were in short supply, but the Red Cross helped to funnel supplies sent by friends at home. The Clewer parish magazine urged parishioners to help out:

We desire to call the attention of our Readers to the excellent work which is being done by “the Berkshire Prisoners of War Fund.” Tins of food and clothing are sent every week from the Windsor Guildhall to prisoners of the Berkshire Regiment and other prisoners connected with this neighbourhood. All who wish to help in this good work are asked to contribute in money or kind. Every Thursday goods are packed and despatched from the Guildhall. Two or three of our Dedworth men are amongst the prisoners receiving this help.

Clewer parish magazine, July 1915 (D/P39/28A/9)