A Memorial which will stand for centuries as a keepsake of the bravery and sacrifice of Mortimer’s sons

Mortimer people had responded generously to the war memorial appeal.

War Memorial

The response to our appeal last month has been most satisfactory, many gifts, and some of them big gifts, having been received. The total now paid in or promised is £453 out of the £500 required. The remaining £47 which is needed may be expected to come in readily enough during this month; for probably everybody would like to be connected, by however small a gift, with a Memorial which will stand for centuries as a keepsake of the bravery and sacrifice of Mortimer’s sons. Probably also a good number of people have delayed to send in their gift, but will do so now when it is known that before long the fund will be closed. Any member of the Committee will gladly receive and forward any gifts, or these may be sent to the Hon. Sec. Miss Phelp, Wisley, Padworth Road, or be forwarded by cheque or postal order to Lloyds Bank, Reading, made payable to “Mortimer War Memorial Fund.”

The stone for the Memorial has been secured, but the bronze castings of the names and the inscription will be a slow business, and, though the carving of the stonework will be put in hand as soon as the sum required is received, the architect warns us not to expect to see the whole structure completed until early in next summer.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, November 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

“The Committee cannot proceed with the design selected unless a total of at least £500 is secured”

Stratfield Mortimer needed to raise money for its war memorial.

The War Memorial

The Committee report as follows:-

“Subscriptions received to date at Lloyds Bank are £166 6s 0d. In addition, £100 has been promised. Any donations to this fund should be sent to Lloyds Bank, Reading, crossed ‘Mortimer War Memorial Fund.’ Smaller subscriptions will be gladly welcomed by the Hon. Sec., Miss Phelp, Wisley, Padworth Road.”

It is hoped that the above amounts will be largely increased early this month, as the Committee cannot proceed with the design selected unless a total of at least £500 is secured.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

To make our country, our county, our village, supreme monuments to our Glorious Dead

There was still bitterness towards those who had chosen not to fight.

Discharged Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Federation

On Wednesday, 22nd October, the Mortimer and District Branch met at the Jubilee Room, under the chairmanship of Mr R W Sharp, the prospective representative of the branch on the Local War Pensions Committee. Mr H C Eggleton, the Branch Chairman, explained clearly the objects of the Federation, viz (briefly), “To safeguard the interests of every ex-Service man and the dependants of our fallen comrades, and to make our country, our county, our village, supreme monuments to our Glorious Dead”.

It is hoped that every man who has worn the Blue or Khaki (excepting only conscientious objectors) will join the Federation. Will every man whos is suffering through delayed gratuity, etc, kindly communicate with Mr J Anderson, Secretary, Nightingale Lane, Mortimer, who will give every possible assistance; also all widows, mothers, or other dependants of those who have made the supreme sacrifice. It is hoped to have a Burghfield sub-branch, if enough new members join.

Note: The Editor willingly inserts this, and assures the Branch that the Reading Rural WP sub-committee will hope to work in harmony with a friendly ally.

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A boon that will be widely appreciated

The Comrades of the Great War, a club for old soldiers, opened a branch in Mortimer, using existing premises.

Comrades of the Great War

The Comrades have received permission from Mr. Benyon to re-open the Men’s Club for their members – a boon that will be widely appreciated. We wish them all success. The Club will also be available pro tem for the purposes of the Scouts.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

Only married for nine weeks

The after-effects of being gassed in the trenches could last for years.

A Soldier’s Death

On Sunday, Aug. 10th, there died in the Royal Berks Hospital, Reading, at the age of 30, Lance-Corpl. Frederick Thomas King. For some time he had been suffering from pneumonia, the complaint being aggravated by gas-poisoning contracted whilst serving in France. Deceased had only been married about nine weeks. We take this opportunity of expressing our sympathy with his widow and family.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

A kaleidoscope, a transformation scene, a hurly-burly, yet an orderly hurly-burly

The people of Stratfield Mortimer celebrated.

Peace and Victory Day

Two ever-memorable days! On Sunday, July 6th, the special services of praise and joy and thanks and hope, well attended, reverent, hearty, charged with deep feeling. The evening congregation at S. John’s filled the church and the singing was noteworthy.

Then on Saturday, July 19th, the merrymaking. Our special correspondent tried in vain to be in two places at once. Yet even so he could wax eloquent on the proceedings both on the Sports’ Ground and in St. John’s Hall had not the Editor ruthlessly refused to allow adequate space. But no pen could do justice to the loyal, happy fellowship of the many workers, to the spirit of the crowd, to the joy of the children over their (unexpected) medals, to the feasting and the music, to the sports and the cricket and the dancing, to the fireworks and the great big blaze.

The Hall and all who worked there were taxed to their utmost capacity; dinner for near 100 of the demobilised; dinner for the workers; tea for 220 children; tea for 50 older folks; tea for the workers; tea for 25 scouts. A kaleidoscope, a transformation scene, a hurly-burly, yet an orderly hurly-burly. All that was wanted and nothing that was not wanted, and what more could anyone wish than that? Great credit and great thanks to the catering committee.

As for “God’s out-of-doors,” we had no procession and no cenotaph, yet probably not one old or young forgot those whom we could not see with us, yet who were with us none the less. Not one forgot to salute them. Therein lay the deeper message and meaning of all the day’s proceedings. This thought was with us even while we danced or raced, jumped or tugged or sang. All went merrily none the less. And this again is homage to the Sports Committee and to their indefatigable president, Colonel Nash.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

Demobilization has helped the singing wonderfully

Choristers returned from the front.

The Choir

Demobilization has helped the singing wonderfully at all services. It is delightful to have the men’s choir seats filled full again. A summer party for the choir is also again possible. The men hope to go up the river on July 10th, and the boys something of the same sort when August comes.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

As if anyone would ever wish to do such a thing as remove the war memorial!

An offer was made to pay for a war memorial in Stratfield Mortimer.

Another War Memorial

Colonel and Mrs. Nash have offered to present to the parish church a large brass tablet on which will be permanently recorded the names of all parishioners who have given their lives for their country during the war – a most welcome gift. This cannot be erected, however, without a “faculty” – a form of legal sanction, the chief value of which is that it prevents anybody from ever removing the memorial, (as if anyone would ever wish to do such a thing!) and a faculty cannot be obtained without the passing of a resolution in its favour by a vestry meeting. A vestry meeting for this purpose will therefore be held on Tuesday, July 8th, at 6-30 p.m., at the parish church vestry.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

The Germans are still trying to make up their minds

Some feared it was not time to celebrate quite yet.

Peace

At the time of writing peace is not yet signed and the Germans are still trying to make up their minds, but the question of peace celebrations was discussed at a recent meeting of the Parish Council. Several suggestions were made and it was decided to lay proposals before a Parish meeting very shortly, when people will have an opportunity of criticising and amending any scheme brought forward.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

Careful and repeated consideration of many war memorial designs

There was a U turn over the Mortimer memorial.

War Memorial

The recent public meeting reversed the decision of its predecessor, and unanimously agreed to place the Memorial at the Cross roads at the top of the hill near the Pound. Mr. Maryon’s design was accepted, after the committee’s careful and repeated consideration of many other designs. At least £500 is now asked for. An account has been opened at Lloyds Bank, Reading, and donors are asked to draw cheques to “Mortimer War Memorial or Bearer” and send them direct to Lloyds Bank. Smaller amounts should be sent in cash to the Hon. Sec. at Wisley, Padworth Road.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

“It is an appalling thought that a nation lately saved by the sacrifice of so many noble lives should be ready to run the risk of civil war”

The vicar of Stratfield Mortimer was disappointed by attitudes after the war.

Easter

At the moment of writing, the whole country is in a state of uncertainty and anxiety as to the future. It is an appalling thought that a nation lately saved by the sacrifice of so many noble lives should be ready to run the risk of civil war. There appears to be a terrible spirit of “grab” abroad, which is a melancholy thing to have to show as a result of the shining examples of self-sacrifice so recently given. The war did not bring us back to God, and it may be there are yet more terrible lessons before us. Will all Christians make a special effort this Holy Week to meditate upon the Divine Sacrifice and pray for something of the same spirit of love in our country?

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

“On view, for public approval, in the window of Mr. Methold’s Garage”

A war memorial design was put out to public consultation.

War Memorial

The design unanimously recommended by the Committee is now on view, for public approval, in the window of Mr. Methold’s Garage.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

Very fine work has been done

Another war hospital closed its doors. This one had been in the Working Men’s Club in Mortimer.

The V.A.D. Hospital

After four years and six months’ valued service, the Mortimer War Hospital closed its doors on February 28th. Under many difficulties, and in spite of frequent changes in the staff, very fine work has been done, and Miss Wyld. M.B.E., is to be congratulated upon the way in which she has, as Commandant, stuck to her work through thick and thin. Six hundred and thirty-four patients have passed through the hospital. To Dr. Cox and to all the voluntary staff these owe a deep debt of gratitude.

The Commandant writes as follows:-

“I should like to take this opportunity of thanking all the many kind friends who have so constantly sent gifts, often unknown to me, which have been a great boon to our many patients during the past 4 ½ years.

F. M. Wyld, Commandant.”

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

It has been a delightful experience to welcome home some of those who have been far too long absent

PoWs were coming home at last.

Prisoners of War

It has been a delightful experience to welcome home some of those who have been far too long absent.

Mrs. Trevor thanks all those who so kindly subscribed to the Rifle Brigade Prisoners of War Bread Fund. From July 15th, 1916, to October 22nd, 1918, inclusive, £123 14 s. 3d. was sent to the Treasurer of the Fund. The balance £12 4s. 6d. has been sent to Sir A. Pearson for S. Dunstan’s Hostel, where so many of our blind soldiers and sailors are. The accounts have been most kindly audited each half-year by Mr. Sillence, and the balance sheet hung up in the porch of S. John’s Church.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, February 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)

A bronze plaque with appropriate figures in relief

Plans were underway for a war memorial in Stratfield Mortimer.

War Memorial

The Committee appointed on November 19th have got to work, and have agreed to recommend to the adjourned public meeting:

(1) that the Memorial take the form of a cross; (2) that the cross should have on one side a bronze plaque with appropriate figures in relief, and an inscription; (3) that names be in bronze in relief on the other three sides; (4) that not less than £500 would be required for a worthy Memorial.

One scale model has already been submitted to the Committee, but they are asking for other designs also before making their report. Over £60 has already been received, and further donations will be welcomed at any time by the Hon. Sec. Miss Phelp, Wisley, Padworth Road.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, January 1919 (D/P120/28A/14)