Well known local ladies raise funds

A big bazaar was held in Wargrave in aid of war charities.

June
A War Time Bazaar

A bazaar will be held on Saturday, June 23rd, at Ferry Lodge, Wargrave. The proceeds will be divided between the St. Dunstans Hostel for Blinded Sailors and Soldiers and the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund.

Many Ladies well-known in the neighbourhood are taking a great deal of trouble to make the Bazaar a success.

Quite a novel feature will be introduced in using different rooms at Ferry Lodge, in which the particular things appropriate to the rooms will be sold. These will include a bedroom, kitchen, drawing room, river room, etc.

Joyce’s well-known band has been engaged to play by the river, and there will be cocoanut shies, clock golf and other amusements.

The entrance has been fixed at 1/- from 3 to 6.30 p.m. and at 6d. from 8 to 10 p.m. people coming by river can moor their boats at the Ferry Lodge landing stage.

July
The Bazaar

On Saturday, June 23rd, a Bazaar was held at Ferry Lodge, and Mrs. Maxwell Hicks and her helpers are to be most sincerely congratulated upon the excellent result attained. The object was to raise funds for St. Dunstan’s Hostel, Lord Roberts Memorial Fund and Local Wargrave Charities. All these will benefit most materially, as about £600 was realised.

Lady Henry very kindly came to open the sale.

Wargrave parish magazine, June-July 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Two sons killed within three months

The war was taking a heavy toll.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

With much regret we have to record this month the death in action of yet two more Winkfield men. Pte. George Holloway and Pte. Tom Simmonds.

Mr. and Mrs. Holloway have now lost two sons within three months, and deep sympathy is felt for them in these heavy bereavements. Pte. Tom Simmonds was for many years one of our bell-ringers, and we tender his parents and family heartfelt sympathy.

Pte. W. J. Johnson is also reported killed in action. His mother has lately been living in Winkfield and will have the sympathy of many friends here.

Pte. Albert Carter, who has been out at the Front ever since the outbreak of war, is wounded; he is in hospital in England and we are glad to learn that he is doing well. His brother, Pte. John Carter is dangerously ill in hospital. As we write we hear that he has had a turn for the better and so hope that he is now on the road to recovery.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/6)

Conspicuous bravery

A member of Reading’s Broad Street Church was awarded a medal.

The news that our friend, 2nd Lieut. Victor Smith, had won the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery at the Battle of Arras, has caused considerable pleasure throughout our whole community. Lieut. Smith has a host of friends and well-wishers at Broad Street, who hold him in the highest regard for his own sake, as well as for his work’s sake. They rejoice in his new honour. I wish to offer heartiest possible congratulations to Lieut. Smith and our earnest hope and prayer that he may be spared for many years to enjoy his new distinction….

Sunday June 17th is the day fixed for the Annual Choir Festival this year, when special music will be rendered by the choir at both morning and evening worship…

For many years now the members of the choir have been entertained to a River Trip, the expenses incurred being met, in large part, by the collections taken at the Festival. This year, owing to the conditions brought about by the war, they have decided to forego this outing. Instead they propose to invite a number of wounded soldiers to a Garden Party at which tea will be served and a concert provided. The cost of this entertainment will be more than usual, as it will be impossible to invite friends to buy tickets and thus share the expense.

We feel sure that the congregation will appreciate this patriotic desire of the choir members, and encourage them in their good work by giving generously to the collections.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, June 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)

“We gladly take this opportunity of putting their minds at rest”

There was a bit of a spat among women war workers in Bracknell.

We have been given to understand that some of the Bracknell members of Q.M.N.G. have taken exception to Warfield Members having made bandages for the War Hospital in Reading, under the impression that this had been done out of funds entrusted to Q.M.N.G.

We gladly take this opportunity of putting their minds at rest on this subject. Q.M.N.G. Funds were not touched for this and the accounts were kept quite separately. We have similarly undertaken work in response to an appeal from Colonel Burges. But in those cases we have got extra workers in addition to any who may have been members of Q.M.N.G. to help any such urgent case.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/6)

The provisions of the Royal Warrant with regard to discharged disabled Soldiers and Sailors

The porter of Abingdon Workhouse, wounded on active service, returned to work – but stayed on the army’s books.

11th June 1917

A circular recently issued by the Local Government Board calling attention to the provisions of the Royal Warrant with regard to discharged disabled Soldiers and Sailors was read and it was resolved that the same be filed for future reference.

A letter was read from the Local Government Board stating that the Workhouse Porter, E. J. Bradley, had been transferred to Class W. of the Army Reserve to enable him to resume his duties under the Board and requesting in the event of Bradley ceasing to hold Office, the board might be immediately acquainted with the fact. Resolved that the request of the Board be complied with.

Minutes of Abingdon Board of Guardians (G/A1/32)

Do the German hear our starlight singing in their distant trenches?

There was much news of soldiers from Maidenhead Congregational Church.

OUR SOLDIERS.

We are glad to be able to report that Reginald Hill is so far improving, that he has been able to sit up a little each day. Thomas S. Russell has been called up, and is in training with the Motor Transport Section of the A.S.C. G.C. Frampton after about two hours drill was considered advanced enough for foreign service, and left England for France on May 18th. He is gone into Military Canteen work.

An interesting letter has come to hand from Sidney Eastman, which may justly be described as lengthy, for it is written upon a piece of paper some seven or eight feet long, and covers both sides. It is mostly occupied with a description of his travels and of the sights he has seen, and we are glad to gather that he is in good health and spirits.

G.C. Frampton has been unpatriotic enough to take German measles, and is in Hospital at Etaples. We hope to learn very shortly that he is quite well again.

Alfred Vardy, after a severe bout of pneumonia, caught on his way to the Front in France, is now at a Convalescent Camp in Thetford, gaining strength before returning to duty.

Wilfrid Collins is in hospital at Reading, suffering from heart weakness following upon a severe attack of “Trench fever.”

Reginald Hill has been out of bed for an hour, and is going on satisfactorily, though slowly.

Cyril Hews had a somewhat narrow escape recently. He was out with his motor-bicycle upon a French road during a thunderstorm, when the lightning struck a tree by the road-side, and a large branch fell upon the handlebars of the machine, providentially leaving the rider untouched.

Alfred Lane, after more than a year’s training in the Home Counties’ Engineers at Maidenhead, has been sent over with a draft to France.

Harry Baldwin, having attained the age of 18, and being called up, has elected to enter the Navy, and will probably enter a Training School.

One of our young men, who took an active part in the Messines victory, writes:

“Rather a good sight yesterday. I attended with my men a very large open-air drum-head Church Parade Service, as a sort of Thanksgiving Service for our recent great victory. A large number of Welshmen were present, and it really was great to hear these fellows sing “Aberystwith” and “St. Mary,” accompanied by a band.”

The papers, by the way, have been recently telling us that in all the Welsh regiments there are “glee parties,” who sing under the stars, until the Germans must hear and perhaps wonder, in their more or less distant trenches.

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, June 1917 (D/N33/12/1/5)

Invalided solider sent to a Convalescent Home

Hospitals didn’t want wounded soldiers to block beds.

8th June 1917
Convalescent Patient.

The action of the Hon. Secretary in sending an invalided soldier not an inmate of the Hospital to a Convalescent Home at Folkestone was approved.

Maidenhead Cottage Hospital governors’ minutes (D/H1/1/2, p. 338)

Most forms of disablement can be usefully dealt with

Provisions for men left disabled as a result of wounds were becoming personal for Ascot people.

The name of William Tidy (son of Mr. Tidy of the Royal Nurseries) has, we regret to say, to be added to our Prisoners of War.

We also feel deep sympathy for the anxiety of the families of William Nobbs and Walter Barton, both of whom are reported missing.

Sergeant Major Arthur Butcher and Corporal William Jones have been called to the Front.

Pte. Thomas Statham is wounded, but we are thankful to say he is progressing favourably.

Pte. Ernest Taylor has been ill in Mesopotamia.

Corporal Claud Parsons (Machine Gun Corps) has received the Military Medal for gallant conduct.

Lieutenant Ernest Monk (R. West Surrey) has been promoted Captain. He gained his commission owing to conspicuous gallantry. He married the daughter of Mr. Jones, London Road. Both he and Corporal Parsons are wounded.

Pte. Walter Talbot is home, and has been discharged “disabled.”

We would like to say that extensive arrangements for the training of disabled men have been set up all over the Country, and most forms of disablement can be usefully dealt with. Any disabled Sailor or Soldier in the Parish requiring training should apply to Mr. Tottie, who will be very glad to give information and assistance.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/6)

What if discharged disabled soldiers and sailors apply to the workhouse

There was fear that wounded soldiers unable to work might find themelves in the workhouse.

5th June, 1917

A circular letter from the Local Government Board was read with reference to discharged disabled soldiers and sailors asking the Guardians to communicate at once with the Local War Decisions Committee should any become changeable.

A letter was read from the Local Government Board offering no objection to Dr W H Bush’s duties being carried out by D.A.B. Gemmell during the former’s absence on military service.

Wantage Board of Guardians minutes (G/WT1/23, p. 239)

Maintain unity of spirit and the will of sacrifice in the allied nations

The Bishop asked Berkshire churchgoers to pray for the war to end successfully.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the June Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the maintenance in the allied nations of unity of spirit and the will of sacrifice.

For the prosecution and ending of the war in the Name of God, and of Liberty.

For the chaplains, doctors, nurses, the RAMC and the ASC…

Earley St Peter parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Wounded play the usual games

More officers were welcomed to Bisham Abbey.

4 June 1917
Young Lillyman (another Australian) came in afternoon. The wounded spent afternoon here & played usual games & went on river.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

A hospital ship is sunk

Another hospital ship was sunk by the German Navy.

30 May 1917
Another hospital ship, Dover Castle, sunk in Mediterranean – all saved but 5 of crew.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

“May blossoms and war seem as though they ought to be impossible in the same world”

The minister of Maidenhead Congregational Church tried to encourage members to look on the bright side of life despite all the horrors and losses of the war.

May blossoms and war seem as though they ought to be impossible in the same world. The dreadful mud in the midst of which our soldiers have been living is more congruous with the spirit of warfare than sweet grass and hawthorn buds. Many letters from the front have spoken of the start of surprise with which a lark’s song is heard over the trenches. We have all, when some sorrow is heavy upon us, felt a sort of astonishment that the sun should go on shining, and the birds twittering, and passers by smiling, as though nothing had happened. But the worst of sorrows cannot cover the whole sky. We want taking out of ourselves at times. Evils won’t bear brooding over, we only make them worse. We shall be able to bear “the strain of toil, the fret of care” better, if we make rich use of the ministry of the blossoms.

OUR SOLDIERS.

We are glad to hear that Reginald Hill is progressing, though slowly. He has had several operations, and probably must undergo two or three more. The doctors think he may have to be in bed for at least three months yet, but they hope he will make quite a good recovery.

We regret deeply to have to record that John Boyd, formerly the Caretaker of the Chapel, was killed in action on March 29th. He enlisted in the 2nd Berks. In June 1916, and was sent to France on Sept. 22nd. He was a most genial and kind-hearted man, and had a wide circle of friends among whom he was very popular. We offer our Christian sympathy to Mrs. Boyd and her family.

It is distressing too to hear that Stephen Harris is returned as “missing.” The Captain of his Company has written to Mr. and Mrs. Harris that he has made all possible inquiries and can gain no information. The best that can be hoped for is that he may be a prisoner in German hands. Robert Harris was killed in July last. May God grant His patience and consolation to the distressed parents.

Wallace Mattingly has been admitted to Sandhurst Military College for eight months’ training. G. Frampton is expecting to be called up immediately. We are glad to see Cyril Hews at home again on leave, looking in the pink of health. P.S. Eastman writes in good spirits from “somewhere in the East.”

He says, “I have not yet left for the special work for which I was sent out, but may do so any day now. In the meantime I have had quite a variety of work, until at present I find myself in the C.O.’s office. Yesterday I had a line from Frank Pigg, who is with the R.F.C in Salonica; may be one of these days I shall be able to pay him a visit.”

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, May 1917 (D/N33/12/1/5)

A splendid address on Duty and Patriotism that even the tiniest could understand

Empire Day was the focus for patriotic expressions in schools across the county.

Piggott Schools, Wargrave
Empire Day

The children of the Piggott Schools celebrated Empire Day (May 24th) in right loyal fashion. They assembled at the School, and with flags flying, marched down to Church where a short service was held. The Vicar gave an appropriate address. Re-assembling on the Church Green they proceeded to the Schools and took their places round the flag pole from which the Union Jack was flying. A good number of parents and friends of the children with many of the soldiers from the hospital were waiting their return. As the boys passed the soldiers they gave them a salute in recognition of what they had done for their country.

The National Anthem was sung, and the flag saluted, and Miss. E. Sinclair gave a splendid address on Duty and Patriotism in such a way that even the tiniest could understand it. Capt. Bird proposed a vote of thanks to Miss Sinclair and hearty cheers were given in which the soldiers joined. Three Patriotic and Empire Songs were sung by the children, the Vicar called for cheers for the Teachers, and Mr. Coleby announced that Mrs. Cain had most kindly provided buns and sweets for all as they left the grounds. Hearty cheers were given her for her thoughtfulness. Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

Alwyn Road School, Cookham
May 24th 1917

Empire Day was celebrated today. The Headmaster addressed the children assembled in the Hall, and the National Anthem was sung. The children then went to their classrooms and ordinary lessons proceeded till 11 o’clock. Each class teacher then gave a lesson on “Empire” and kindred subjects till 11.30. This was followed by a Writing Lesson when some of the important facts were taken down.

The school assembled in the Hall again at 11.55 and after a few more remarks by the Headmaster the national Anthem was again sung and the children dismissed.

Opportunity was taken of this morning’s addresses to instil into the children’s minds the necessity of economising in the use of all food stuffs, and more especially of bread and flour.

A holiday was granted in the afternoon. (more…)

“The soldiers are in dire need of comfort both physical and spiritual”

A Congregational minister from east Reading had spent the winter with the YMCA, working with British troops in France.

VISIT OF REV. LEONARD BROOKS

The minister of Park Congregational Church, Reading, paid us his first visit on the 23rd of May, when he gave to a splendid congregation part of the story of his experiences with the troops in France during the winter. Mr Brooks told the incidents with great feeling and force, and revealed to us in striking fashion the need there was for religion to be manifested as a very practical thing.

What we heard of his work among the relatives of the wounded and the dying was most interesting, and to many of us it was a section of YMCA enterprise of which no thought had ever been held. We imagine quite readily that the soldiers are in dire need of comfort both physical and spiritual, but that there should be poignant sorrow among the wives and mothers had very rarely occurred to us as calling for the special labours of the YM.

Mr Brooks did not dwell altogether on the grave side of the matter; there were tales of much merriment, of muddled recipes, failing lights, pilgrimages up and down long flights of steps, etc, which kept us from taking the more serious aspect of the war too seriously. We felt much indebted to Mr Brooks for coming over to open out to us a new side of things, as well as for going to France at all, and we hope that his labours over there are resulting in a greater acceptance of the higher things in which he ministered.

Tilehurst Congregational Church section of Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, July 1917 (D/N11/12/1/14)