“He has now lost, like so many others, his only son”

A young pilot from Berkshire had been shot down. His wealthy family had moved to Wargrave Manor in 1898 when he was 13. As well as a grieving father and sister, he left a young widow (who after the war married another RFC officer) and 18 month old old daughter.

Vicar’s letter

We all sympathise with the sorrow which has fallen on our old friend and benefactor, Mr Sydney Platt, by the loss of his son Lionel, late Capt. in the Royal Flying Corps. Some of you may remember he used to bicycle over with his father and sister from Wargrave to service here when he was a boy at Eton. Those years are long past, but his father’s generosity and interest in our parish has been maintained at all times and he has now lost, like so many others, his only son. May he be comforted.

Earley St Nicolas parish magazine (D/P192/28A/14)

Killed in HMS Vanguard

An Earley man went down with HMS Vanguard, which exploded at Scapa Flow. It remains one of the worst accidental disasters to befall the Royal Navy.

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list: Howard Bull, Russell Harmer, Leonard Tovey.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

SICK OR WOUNDED: Leonard Brown, Gilbert Adams, Frank Hayward.
DIED OF WOUNDS: Robert Newton, William Murphy.
KILLED IN HMS “VANGUARD”: James Hall.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, August 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

“We could hardly realise that our popular Big Drummer would never return to help us again”

Teenage boys from Earley had the fun of a camp dispelled by sad news of old friends who had gone to the Front.

CHURCH LADS’ BRIGADE AND SCOUTS

We had a most enjoyable time on the School journey in spite of the weather. A very full account is being published in the “Reading Observer”, and we are hoping that Mr Albert Smith will be able to spare the time to come and give us a Lantern Lecture describing our travels, so we shall not enter into details now. Several of the Cadets and two more Scouts joined us at Hungerford when we spent a most delightful four days, everyone showing us the greatest kindness.

The news of the death of our late Staff-Sergeant George Maskell came as a great shock to us on our return, and we could hardly realise that our popular Big Drummer would never return to help us again. We had a Memorial Service after Matins on Sunday, August 12th, some of our friends from St Giles’ and St John’s Companies joining us for the Parade Service and staying to the Memorial Service. We offer our deep sympathy to the relations and friends of one whom we all loved – RIP.

On going to press we have just heard of the death of another of our CLB Staff Sergeants, John Parker. Jack was one of our very keenest and best CLB workers and we shall miss him terribly. We offer our deepest sympathy to his mother and other relations and friends. RIP.


Earley St Peter parish magazine, September 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Setting such a good example in food economy, that at present there is not much prospect of compulsory rationing

Reading clergy agreed none of their churches would put on a tea for Sunday School children this year.

THE VICAR’S LETTER

My dear friends,

The Bishop of Oxford, in the Diocesan Magazine for this month, calls especial attention to the effort that is to be made following on the National Mission of last year. To stimulate prayer and interest and self-sacrifice for the overseas work of the Church, Sunday, October 14th, and the days following have been set apart for this purpose in Reading, and we hope that there will be a wide response. The Bishop expresses his earnest wish that we and our people should realise the great obligations laid upon us by the war for the evangelization of the world…

At a meeting of the clergy, of all denominations in Reading, held a short time ago, it was resolved that there should be no Sunday School Teas as usual, but that an afternoon should be set aside for games and sports. We are sure that both children and parents will feel that at this time public meals of any sort are to be avoided. We understand that so many town, including Reading, are setting such a good example in food economy, that at present there is not much prospect of compulsory rationing.

Your friend and vicar,
W W Fowler

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list: George Bernard, Bernard Walker, Charles Simmonds, Ernest Dormer, William Cooper.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

KILLED IN ACTION: Albert Denham, Frank Snellgrove, George Jeram.

SICK: Alban Fixsen, William May, Cornelius O’Leary, Francis Broadhurst.

WOUNDED: Frederick Smithers, Frank Taylor, Gilbert Adams.

MISSING: William Wynn.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Cherries instead of tea

Earley children enjoyed their summer treat despite the lack of a meal.

SUNDAY SCHOOLS
The Sunday School Summer Treat had to be postponed from Wednesday, July 18th, on account of the wet, to Saturday, July 21st, when we had a beautiful evening. Although Wednesday afternoon was so wet, we were able to distribute a bag of cherries to each of the children, which were much appreciated. By kind permission of Mr and Mrs Friedlander the games and sports were held in the park, and although the usual tea and scrambles were not given, owing to the Proclamation, the children thoroughly enjoyed themselves.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, August 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Making the best of the difficulties and privations of the times in which we live

Children in Earley would show their solidarity with the troops by doing without refreshments at the annual Sunday School summer party.

SUNDAY SCHOOLS
We hope to hold our Sunday School Summer Treat on Wednesday, July 18th. In loyal obedience to the King’s Proclamation, and in accordance with the wishes of the Food Controller, we shall not have any tea this year, but shall hope to have a jolly evening of games and sports, and we feel certain that all our young people will show the same spirit as our splendid troops and make the best of the difficulties and privations of the times in which we live.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

The walls between races are being done away

The Bishop of Oxford saw the war breaking down barriers of racism, and wanted to spur churchgoers into thinking about mission work after the war.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the July Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are asked
For the country and our allies, especially for Russia, and for the cause in which we are fighting…

THE AUTUMN EFFORT

There is to be an “effort” in the autumn to stimulate prayer and interest and self-sacrifice for the overseas work of the church. It is certain that the great war will put in a new light both the obligation and the opportunity of world-wide evangelization. In particular, America and England will be confronted with professions about human brotherhood and consequent obligations to races whose skins are not of our colour which we cannot possibly disown. But the more deeply we think about the Brotherhood of Nations, the more we are driven back upon Christianity. There is no other religion which can aver make a reasonable claim to be a catholic religion. There only can it be even claimed that the middle walls of partition between race and race are done away.

Well, this moment, with our men away at the war – just the men we want to get to listen – is the last moment for a Missionary Crusade. Nut we who stay at home must be preparing our message. And I want every parish priest, every parochial study and prayer circle, every ruri-decanal committee for overseas work, to see to it that, by whatever method, some real effort is made this autumn to make our people realise (1) the vast obligation – as the situation arising out of the war will present it afresh – which lies on us to evangelize the world; (2) the immense needs of a missionary field denuded of even its normal equipment, short as that always was; (3) the call of Christ upon young men and women for a sacrifice in the cause of the Kingdom of Christ corresponding to the sacrifice evoked by the war.

C. OXON.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

The need for eggs is greater than ever

So many people kept chickens that the gift of eggs to hospitals for the wounded was an obvious patriotic offering. Some people had more to give away than others. Three ladies in Early had donated over 1000 eggs each over a two year period.

NATIONAL EGG COLLECTION

Eggs are collected every Thursday at the School, for the sick and wounded. During the two years ending in May, over 9,000 have been given by the residents of Earley.

Our chief contributors are: Mrs Hissey, 1,200; Miss Montizambert, 1139; Mrs Bastow, 1,041; Mr G Hatch, 971; Mr J Lewington, 777; Mrs W Hatch, 733; Mrs P Davis, 630; Mrs Wooridge, 421; Mrs Dance, 389; Mrs Dunlop, 262; Mr F Johnson, 260; Mr Culham, 246; Mrs Hallaway, 218; Mrs G Webb, 205; Misses Beauchamp, 150; Mrs W Nash, 124; Mrs Andrews, 100.

Among those who have given less than 100 are, Mrs G Cane, Mrs Cottrell, Mrs Hutt, Mrs H King, Miss Lea, Miss Liddiard, Miss Nickes, Mrs Prior, Mrs Shotton, Mrs Slaughter, Mrs Whitworth.

The Collector for this district is Mrs de Bathe, of Hartley Court, and she writes to say how very grateful the people at the hospitals are for the eggs, and that the need for them is greater than ever. There is to be a Flag Day on July 14th when Mrs de Bathe hopes there will be a good response especially from this district.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

By wasting food we are helping our enemies

The vicar of Earley issued a rebuke to those wasting food.

THE VICAR’S LETTER
My dear friends,

After one of the longest and coldest winters that have been recorded for a century, we have suddenly plunged into summer; May has been a perfect month for the crops, most of the time lost has already been made up, and there are on every side signs of an abundance of produce of all kinds. Ought we not to be thankful to God for this answer to our prayers, and to pray that he may grant us in these times of stress a successful ingathering?

Ought we not also to be thankful that the prospect of a serious shortage in our food supplies seems gradually to be diminishing? Let us remember, however, that it depends upon ourselves; if we are lavish or wasteful the danger is a very imminent one: if only everyone would realise the evil of waste, things would be very different, but, in spite of all that is said or done, it still goes on.

We still see bread and other food thrown away in the streets, apparently by children whose parents have carelessly given them more food to take with them than they can eat; it may not be much, but it is a sign of the times that wants strict looking after. By wasting food we are helping our enemies, there is no doubt whatever of this, we are prolonging the war and so endangering the lives of thousands of our soldiers and our fellow countrymen…

Your friend and vicar
W W Fowler

Earley St Peter parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

“Doing our best to be worthy of being the cadets of one of the most famous regiments in His Majesty’s Army”

The Church Lads’ Brigade offered training for teenage boys which in many cases led to heroic actions as adults at the Front.

CHURCH LADS’ BRIGADE CADETS

We had a very good Field Day at Streatley on Whit-Monday. The Battalion turned up in good strength, and some useful skirmishing practice was got through on the Downs, an ideal spot for such work.
On Saturday, June 9th, the Annual Battalion Marching Competition was held. By kind permission of the Headmaster of Reading School, the various Companies assembled in the School Quad, and under the management of Sergeant-Major Green, were quickly got into due order for inspection. Colonel Melville, RAMC, very kindly came over from Aldershot to judge the competition, and expressed himself as quite astonished at the efficiency of the lads and highly delighted with the whole arrangements and the esprit de corps displayed by the teams. We congratulate our friends the Caversham Company on winning the Shield, our Earley lads were a very close third.

The arrangements for Whit-Monday and the Marching Competition were very ably carried out by the Acting Adjutant, Capt. H A Smith-Masters, who has just received his commission as a Chaplain in the Army. We congratulate him, and shall miss his help very much. He is the fourth Adjutant we have had since the war began, and all four are now serving in the Forces.

Our Captain, Corporal C J O’Leary, MTASC, received some rather severe scalds while rescuing a comrade from a motor which went wrong, and has been in hospital in France, but we are glad to say he is now much better again.

The following Army Order has filled us with pleasure and determination to try and do our best to be worthy of being the cadets of one of the most famous regiments in His Majesty’s Army:

“ARMY ORDER 128, 1917.

The Army Orders for April contain one of the most epoch-making which has ever been issued in respect of the CLB. It runs thus:

‘The recognised Cadet Battalions of the Church Lads’ Brigade are affiliated to the King’s Royal Rifle Corps.’

We hope that every member of the CLB will appreciate the honour of belonging to the famous 60th, and that this will be one more incentive to obtain even a higher standard than the CLB has ever attained before.

The great fact is accomplished, and we hope by it the future of the CLB is assured, and that an adequate safeguard of all its religious training and ideal is achieved.”

Having passed the required examinations, the following lads have been promoted as stated: Corporals F Ansell and C Downham to be Sergeants; Private M Smith to be Lance-Corporal.

The body of one of our old members, Frank Snellgrove, who has been missing for months, has been discovered by a Chaplain in France, and reverently buried with full Christian rites. We offer our deepest sympathy to his people, who have thus lost their only son.

H. Wardley King [the curate]

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Maintain unity of spirit and the will of sacrifice in the allied nations

The Bishop asked Berkshire churchgoers to pray for the war to end successfully.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the June Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the maintenance in the allied nations of unity of spirit and the will of sacrifice.

For the prosecution and ending of the war in the Name of God, and of Liberty.

For the chaplains, doctors, nurses, the RAMC and the ASC…

Earley St Peter parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

A splendid address on Duty and Patriotism that even the tiniest could understand

Empire Day was the focus for patriotic expressions in schools across the county.

Piggott Schools, Wargrave
Empire Day

The children of the Piggott Schools celebrated Empire Day (May 24th) in right loyal fashion. They assembled at the School, and with flags flying, marched down to Church where a short service was held. The Vicar gave an appropriate address. Re-assembling on the Church Green they proceeded to the Schools and took their places round the flag pole from which the Union Jack was flying. A good number of parents and friends of the children with many of the soldiers from the hospital were waiting their return. As the boys passed the soldiers they gave them a salute in recognition of what they had done for their country.

The National Anthem was sung, and the flag saluted, and Miss. E. Sinclair gave a splendid address on Duty and Patriotism in such a way that even the tiniest could understand it. Capt. Bird proposed a vote of thanks to Miss Sinclair and hearty cheers were given in which the soldiers joined. Three Patriotic and Empire Songs were sung by the children, the Vicar called for cheers for the Teachers, and Mr. Coleby announced that Mrs. Cain had most kindly provided buns and sweets for all as they left the grounds. Hearty cheers were given her for her thoughtfulness. Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

Alwyn Road School, Cookham
May 24th 1917

Empire Day was celebrated today. The Headmaster addressed the children assembled in the Hall, and the National Anthem was sung. The children then went to their classrooms and ordinary lessons proceeded till 11 o’clock. Each class teacher then gave a lesson on “Empire” and kindred subjects till 11.30. This was followed by a Writing Lesson when some of the important facts were taken down.

The school assembled in the Hall again at 11.55 and after a few more remarks by the Headmaster the national Anthem was again sung and the children dismissed.

Opportunity was taken of this morning’s addresses to instil into the children’s minds the necessity of economising in the use of all food stuffs, and more especially of bread and flour.

A holiday was granted in the afternoon. (more…)

Four Earley men killed in action

More news of Earley men:

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following names have been added to our prayer list:

Frederick Parsons, Victor Phelps, Gordon Turner, Ernest Phillips, Fred Elliott, George Polden, Cecil Ludlow, Oscar Mount.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

KILLED IN ACTION: Leonard Leaver, Walter Reeve, Charles Bolton, William Mears.

SICK: Walter Hayward, William Durman, William Hewett, George Polden.

WOUNDED: Tom Durman, Horace Stamp, William Childs, George Slaughter, Albert Hiscock, Alfred Still, Charles Seely.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Pneumonia in France

There was good news for friends of an officer.

With great thankfulness we learn that Lieut. Hugh Kennedy, who lay for some while ill with pneumonia in hospital in France, is now decidedly improving.

Earley St Nicolas parish magazine (D/P192/28A/14)

Wise dealing with the Liquor question

The Bishop asked Berkshire churchgoers to pray for Russia, our ally in the throes of revolution, and for the question of alcohol restrictions at home.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the May Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the Russian people and Government and Church

For the Chaplains to the troops, especially those who have gone from this diocese.

For parishes whence clergy have gone on National service, that their spiritual interests may not suffer.

For wise dealing by the Government with the Liquor question…


Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)