By wasting food we are helping our enemies

The vicar of Earley issued a rebuke to those wasting food.

THE VICAR’S LETTER
My dear friends,

After one of the longest and coldest winters that have been recorded for a century, we have suddenly plunged into summer; May has been a perfect month for the crops, most of the time lost has already been made up, and there are on every side signs of an abundance of produce of all kinds. Ought we not to be thankful to God for this answer to our prayers, and to pray that he may grant us in these times of stress a successful ingathering?

Ought we not also to be thankful that the prospect of a serious shortage in our food supplies seems gradually to be diminishing? Let us remember, however, that it depends upon ourselves; if we are lavish or wasteful the danger is a very imminent one: if only everyone would realise the evil of waste, things would be very different, but, in spite of all that is said or done, it still goes on.

We still see bread and other food thrown away in the streets, apparently by children whose parents have carelessly given them more food to take with them than they can eat; it may not be much, but it is a sign of the times that wants strict looking after. By wasting food we are helping our enemies, there is no doubt whatever of this, we are prolonging the war and so endangering the lives of thousands of our soldiers and our fellow countrymen…

Your friend and vicar
W W Fowler

Earley St Peter parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

“Doing our best to be worthy of being the cadets of one of the most famous regiments in His Majesty’s Army”

The Church Lads’ Brigade offered training for teenage boys which in many cases led to heroic actions as adults at the Front.

CHURCH LADS’ BRIGADE CADETS

We had a very good Field Day at Streatley on Whit-Monday. The Battalion turned up in good strength, and some useful skirmishing practice was got through on the Downs, an ideal spot for such work.
On Saturday, June 9th, the Annual Battalion Marching Competition was held. By kind permission of the Headmaster of Reading School, the various Companies assembled in the School Quad, and under the management of Sergeant-Major Green, were quickly got into due order for inspection. Colonel Melville, RAMC, very kindly came over from Aldershot to judge the competition, and expressed himself as quite astonished at the efficiency of the lads and highly delighted with the whole arrangements and the esprit de corps displayed by the teams. We congratulate our friends the Caversham Company on winning the Shield, our Earley lads were a very close third.

The arrangements for Whit-Monday and the Marching Competition were very ably carried out by the Acting Adjutant, Capt. H A Smith-Masters, who has just received his commission as a Chaplain in the Army. We congratulate him, and shall miss his help very much. He is the fourth Adjutant we have had since the war began, and all four are now serving in the Forces.

Our Captain, Corporal C J O’Leary, MTASC, received some rather severe scalds while rescuing a comrade from a motor which went wrong, and has been in hospital in France, but we are glad to say he is now much better again.

The following Army Order has filled us with pleasure and determination to try and do our best to be worthy of being the cadets of one of the most famous regiments in His Majesty’s Army:

“ARMY ORDER 128, 1917.

The Army Orders for April contain one of the most epoch-making which has ever been issued in respect of the CLB. It runs thus:

‘The recognised Cadet Battalions of the Church Lads’ Brigade are affiliated to the King’s Royal Rifle Corps.’

We hope that every member of the CLB will appreciate the honour of belonging to the famous 60th, and that this will be one more incentive to obtain even a higher standard than the CLB has ever attained before.

The great fact is accomplished, and we hope by it the future of the CLB is assured, and that an adequate safeguard of all its religious training and ideal is achieved.”

Having passed the required examinations, the following lads have been promoted as stated: Corporals F Ansell and C Downham to be Sergeants; Private M Smith to be Lance-Corporal.

The body of one of our old members, Frank Snellgrove, who has been missing for months, has been discovered by a Chaplain in France, and reverently buried with full Christian rites. We offer our deepest sympathy to his people, who have thus lost their only son.

H. Wardley King [the curate]

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Maintain unity of spirit and the will of sacrifice in the allied nations

The Bishop asked Berkshire churchgoers to pray for the war to end successfully.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the June Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the maintenance in the allied nations of unity of spirit and the will of sacrifice.

For the prosecution and ending of the war in the Name of God, and of Liberty.

For the chaplains, doctors, nurses, the RAMC and the ASC…

Earley St Peter parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

A splendid address on Duty and Patriotism that even the tiniest could understand

Empire Day was the focus for patriotic expressions in schools across the county.

Piggott Schools, Wargrave
Empire Day

The children of the Piggott Schools celebrated Empire Day (May 24th) in right loyal fashion. They assembled at the School, and with flags flying, marched down to Church where a short service was held. The Vicar gave an appropriate address. Re-assembling on the Church Green they proceeded to the Schools and took their places round the flag pole from which the Union Jack was flying. A good number of parents and friends of the children with many of the soldiers from the hospital were waiting their return. As the boys passed the soldiers they gave them a salute in recognition of what they had done for their country.

The National Anthem was sung, and the flag saluted, and Miss. E. Sinclair gave a splendid address on Duty and Patriotism in such a way that even the tiniest could understand it. Capt. Bird proposed a vote of thanks to Miss Sinclair and hearty cheers were given in which the soldiers joined. Three Patriotic and Empire Songs were sung by the children, the Vicar called for cheers for the Teachers, and Mr. Coleby announced that Mrs. Cain had most kindly provided buns and sweets for all as they left the grounds. Hearty cheers were given her for her thoughtfulness. Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

Alwyn Road School, Cookham
May 24th 1917

Empire Day was celebrated today. The Headmaster addressed the children assembled in the Hall, and the National Anthem was sung. The children then went to their classrooms and ordinary lessons proceeded till 11 o’clock. Each class teacher then gave a lesson on “Empire” and kindred subjects till 11.30. This was followed by a Writing Lesson when some of the important facts were taken down.

The school assembled in the Hall again at 11.55 and after a few more remarks by the Headmaster the national Anthem was again sung and the children dismissed.

Opportunity was taken of this morning’s addresses to instil into the children’s minds the necessity of economising in the use of all food stuffs, and more especially of bread and flour.

A holiday was granted in the afternoon. (more…)

Four Earley men killed in action

More news of Earley men:

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following names have been added to our prayer list:

Frederick Parsons, Victor Phelps, Gordon Turner, Ernest Phillips, Fred Elliott, George Polden, Cecil Ludlow, Oscar Mount.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

KILLED IN ACTION: Leonard Leaver, Walter Reeve, Charles Bolton, William Mears.

SICK: Walter Hayward, William Durman, William Hewett, George Polden.

WOUNDED: Tom Durman, Horace Stamp, William Childs, George Slaughter, Albert Hiscock, Alfred Still, Charles Seely.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Pneumonia in France

There was good news for friends of an officer.

With great thankfulness we learn that Lieut. Hugh Kennedy, who lay for some while ill with pneumonia in hospital in France, is now decidedly improving.

Earley St Nicolas parish magazine (D/P192/28A/14)

Wise dealing with the Liquor question

The Bishop asked Berkshire churchgoers to pray for Russia, our ally in the throes of revolution, and for the question of alcohol restrictions at home.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the May Diocesan Magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the Russian people and Government and Church

For the Chaplains to the troops, especially those who have gone from this diocese.

For parishes whence clergy have gone on National service, that their spiritual interests may not suffer.

For wise dealing by the Government with the Liquor question…


Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

“We shall all do our best to keep our end up until the happy day when he can once more return”

The leader of the Church Lads’ Brigade in Earley, a wounded soldier, had recovered sufficiently to join the Army Service Corps, while some of the group’s former members had been killed or wounded.

CLB

We are once again – let us hope for only a short time – losing our Adjutant, Captain C J O’Leary, who has joined the MTASC.

Since his discharge after being wounded at the Battle of the Aisne, Captain O’Leary has thrown himself wholeheartedly into the work of the Battalion, as well as working up his own St Peter’s Earley Company to a high state of efficiency, and we shall miss him terribly. Our very best wishes will go with him wherever he may be sent, and we shall all do our best to keep our end up until the happy day when he can once more return to us.

We greatly regret to say that two more of our first members have been killed in action, Leonard Leaver and Charles Bolton, and we would express our deepest sympathy with their relatives in their sorrow. RIP.

We tender our heartiest congratulations on being awarded the Military Medal. As we are going to press we hear that Sergeant Seely is seriously wounded and are anxiously awaiting further news.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Promoting the economical use of foods

The Education Committee was at the forefront of war savings schemes locally. School were also to be used to promote changes in people’s habits with regards to food and cookery given the food shortages resulting from the war.

Report of Berks War Savings Committee

The War Savings Committee submit the following report of their work since the report to the July meeting of the Education Committee:

In accordance with the powers given to them on appointment, the following additional members have been co-opted:

Mr G F Slade
Mr T Skurray

During July and August last… Local Committees for War Savings came into being at Abingdon, Windsor and Maidenhead. Since that date, as a result of public meetings addressed by Miss Fraser of the National War Savings Committee and the Education Secretary, Local Committees have been started at Pangbourne, Thatcham, Newbury, Wallingford, Bracknell, Hungerford and Wokingham. Up to the 31 March, War Savings Associations have been established under the control of these Local Committees as follows:

Abingdon, with 6 Associations

Wallingford, 15 Associations

Pangbourne, 4 Associations

Hungerford, 7 Associations

Newbury, 15 Associations

Thatcham, 5 Associations

Wokingham, 13 Associations

Windsor

Maidenhead, 32 Associations

Bracknell, 13 Associations

As a general rule, these local committees deal only with their immediate areas, but efforts are being made by the National War Savings Committee to secure the extension of their activities to the surrounding parishes; e.g. the Associations of Marcham and Moulsford are affiliated to the Abingdon and Wallingford Local Committees respectively, and the War Savings Associations at the Cookham, Alwyn Road Council School, and Clewer S. Stephen’s School are affiliated to the Maidenhead and Windsor Local Committees respectively, whilst the Earley CE School War Savings Association is affiliated to the Reading Central Committee.

The Associations in connexion with Windsor Castle and the Broadmoor Asylum are affiliated directly with the National Committee.

The number of War Savings Associations (in addition to the above) in the Rural Parishes formed up to the 31 March, is 56; at least one half of these are in connexion with the schools….

The average amount saved by each Association during the quarter January to March, 1917, is £217. These figures do not include the grouped Associations, and relate only to the smaller Rural Associations, where the opportunities to save are less than in the larger centres of population.

The Berks Teachers’ Association officials in January consented to help in the work, and have been successful in arousing and maintaining interest in the movement. Messrs Camburn, James and Fryer, in particular, have done most valuable service.

The National War Savings Committee have been invited by the Ministry of Food to assist in the Food Economy Campaign, and the Berks War Savings Committee have had before them the Central Committee’s suggestions for Local Authorities and War Savings Committees, and in conjunction with the School Management Sub-committee, they have approved the arrangements embodied in the following memorandum:

FOOD CAMPAIGN

The Food Controller, in conjunction with the National War Savings Committee, has suggested that “Under the auspices of the Education Authorities a Conference might be called in every area with a view to enlisting the enthusiastic support and active help of teachers. In the case of ordinary schools, the children will form a means of securing the interest of the parents, and invitations to meetings and special classes can be issued through them. The Domestic Science teachers will be wanted to take charge of such classes.

After consultation with HM Inspector, the following preliminary Scheme has been drafted:

That the Instructresses be instructed to modify their syllabus with a view:

To promote the economical use of foods of which there is an available supply in the locality.

To prepare specimen menus for family use based on the above, with notes on the quantities required to give a proper diet.

To arrange to have the cooked meals on view after the lessons, so that the mothers can see them and ask questions.

To confer with the Head Teachers of the neighbouring schools as to the best way of spreading useful information among the parents of children not in attendance at the Centres, either by inviting visits which could be regarded as object lessons or by co-operating in drawing up a scheme for simple instruction in the schools.

It is to be noted that:

While it is important to keep the full record of all meals and their cost, it is not to be expected that the employment of substitutes will effect any substantial saving in cost, as the price of substitutes must rise as the standard foods become scarce.

It is most important to give guidance as to the feeding of children, as in some families there may be a tendency to reduce the food value of their meals.

Where milk is obtainable, it will be very useful to emphasise its uses in cookery.

It is hoped to hold a conference as soon as the Instructresses have drawn up their Scheme, and it is most important that the scheme should be prepared as soon as possible.

This Conference was held on the 20th April and the preliminary steps have been already taken to start work.

Report of Education Finance Sub-committee

The Sub-committee have arranged with certain employees on Military Service, who were receiving allowances from the Committee, to invest on their behalf part of their allowances in War Savings Certificates.

Reports to Berkshire Education Committee, 28 April 1917 (C/CL/C1/1/20)

Pray that we may receive in safety the things which we need from beyond the seas

The Bishop of Oxford shared a prayer for the protection of the food supply, while being concerned for Russia following the revolution.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the April Diocesan magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the Russian people and Government and the Russian Church…

The following prayer for the maintenance of our food supplies is recommended for use and may be used in church:

O GOD, Heavenly Father, Who by Thy Son Jesus Christ hast promised to all them that seek Thy Kingdom and the Righteousness thereof, all things necessary to their bodily sustenance; teach us so to seek Thy Kingdom and Righteousness that we may be worthy to claim Thy Promise. Bless the use of the land for the provision of food, and grant to us abundant crops: and of Thy great mercy, protect, we humbly pray Thee, our merchant ships, and those of our Allies, and of the neutral nations, against the attacks of our enemies; that so we may receive in safety the things which we need from beyond the seas; and may praise Thee always for Thy goodness and loving kindness towards us: through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

C. OXON.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

Godspeed and a safe return

The Mayor of Reading wished men from his own church a safe return from the front.

EASTER VESTRY MEETING AND PARISH MEETING

The Annual Vestry Meeting was held in St Peter’s Hall on Wednesday, April 11th…

The Mayor [F A Sarjeant, also one of the churchwardens] expressed the appreciation of the parishioners of Mr W J Bastow, Mr A J Wilson and Mr E J Likeman who were serving in His Majesty’s Forces, and in the name of the meeting wished them Godspeed and a safe return…

Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

No Palm Crosses could be produced this year for Palm Sunday on account of the War

Restricted imports had an unexpected impact on the tradition of handing out crosses made of palm leaves to worshippers on Palm Sunday.

Earley

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL

As the Palm Crosses could not be obtained this year owing to the great difficulty of importing them, the old English custom was adopted of blessing and distributing willow branches.

Ascot

HOLY WEEK AND EASTER.

No Palm Crosses could be produced this year for Palm Sunday on account of the War. Not only were they double the ordinary price, but the small supply available was entirely sold out.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P191/28A/24) ; Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/5)

It is impossible to forget the war

Yet more men went out from Earley.

C.E.M.S
It is impossible to forget the war, and once again the C.E.M.S. at St Peter’s is confronted with the exigencies of the national need for men. Mr Likeman is called to rejoin the Colours, and, for the third time since the war began, we have to appoint an Acting Hon. Secretary.

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES
The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:
George Neale, Alfred Coxhead, Kenneth Gordon, Reuben Murphy, Thomas Murphy, William Murphy, Jack Murphy, Albert Still, Alfred Still, Herbert Douglas, Horace Giles, William Wilder, Harold Ballard.

In addition to those already mentioned, we especially commend the following to your prayers:

WOUNDED: Walter Samways, Percy Heath, Roby [sic?] Haslam.
SICK: Frank Masser, Frank Berry.
KILLED IN ACTION: William Bungay, Thomas Radbourne, Alfred Stroud.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, March 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

“It is what a nation gives that makes it great”

Maidenhead Congregational Church and St Peter’s Church in Earley supported calls to restrict food consumption, warning of the potential consequences if people did not pitch in voluntarily.

Maidenhead Congregational Church

FOOD ECONOMY.

The Food Controller is making urgent appeals to us all for voluntary limitation of consumption, and for aid where possible in increased food production. And the Prime Minister has specially asked for the fullest co-operation of all member of the Free Churches in carrying forward the great National campaign for economy and increased production. Our readers will forgive us for saying a few words here in response to their appeal.

The fact that the food situation is serious should be clearly grasped by every one. We have always been accustomed to unrestricted purchasing so long as we had the money, and cannot easily imagine a condition of things in which money will not purchase. But with proper precaution now the plans of the enemy will be frustrated. The nation has been placed upon its honour to observe the scale of dietry which Lord Davenport [sic] has published. He has warned us that the machinery to bring into operation a system of compulsory rationing is being organised, and will be used if the voluntary system fails.

Surely there is no one who needs force in such a cause as this. We are rather proud to have some part in the privations and pains which our brothers are bearing in the field and on the sea. The forcible words of Mr. Lloyd George are worth quoting again:

“You cannot have absolute equality of sacrifice in a war. That is impossible. But you can have equal readiness to sacrifice from all… Let the nation as a whole place its comforts, its luxuries, its indulgences, its elegances, on a national altar, consecrated by such sacrifices as these men have made. Let us proclaim during the war a National Lent. The nation will be better and stronger for it, mentally and morally as well as physically. It will strengthen its fibre, it will ennoble its spirit. Without it we shall not get the full benefit of this struggle…. Unless the nation as a whole shoulders part of the burden of victory it will not profit by the triumph, for it is not what a nation gains, it is what a nation gives that makes it great.”

Earley St Peter

THE VICAR’S LETTER

My dear friends

During the whole of this month we shall be keeping Lent and it is the duty of us all to make it a real time of repentance and preparation for Holy Week and Easter. We have today received an appeal to the Nation from the Food Controller, Lord Devonport, containing a quotation from a speech of Mr Lloyd George, headed “A National Lent”. The appeal has been sent to all incumbents with a request that they will lay it before their people…

Mr Lloyd George alludes to abstinence from food only, but what a blessing it would be for our nation if it could keep a really National Lent in the best sense, humbling itself, as a whole, before God and truly repenting of its sins.

Lord Devonport, in his circular, further remarks that from an ethical as well as national point of view self control is of infinitely greater value than enforced discipline: there is no one who will not heartily agree with him, but it should be laid to heart that if the former fails the latter becomes absolutely necessary, from whatever point of view we regard it.

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, March 1917 (D/N33/12/1/5); Earley St Peter parish magazine, March 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

For the deepening of the spirit of self-sacrifice

The Bishop of Oxford’s latest message:

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE

The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the March Diocesan magazine:

Your prayers are specially asked

For the good hand of God upon us in the war:

For those who travel by sea, especially the Bishop of Buckingham:
And for the prisoners of war:

For the deepening of the spirit of self-sacrifice and the desire for purity, temperance and justice in the nation:

For glad correspondence on the part of all with the demand for national service, and for wisdom in freeing the clergy for exceptional kinds of service:…

Earley St Peter parish magazine, March 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)