Children whose father was an interned alien

25th Feb., 1919

The Chairman, on behalf of the House Committee, reported …

That they had considered the case of the children named Geiger whose father was an interned alien, and recommended that the Clerk write [sic] the Local Government Board with a view to the children being removed on their father being released from internment.

Wokingham Board of Guardians minutes (G/WO1/26)

Advertisements

It has been decided to not “repatriate” the British born wives and children of enemy aliens against their will

Windsor had provided a home for the inmates of a Surrey workhouse during the war.

11th February 1919

Mrs Bartholomew

Letter from Local Government Board read, stating, in reply to an enquiry by the Clerk, that in cases where the husband of a woman in receipt of an allowance as a British-born wife of an interned alien has been repatriated, the allowance may be continued to the wife and children, also that it has been decided to not “repatriate” the British born wives and children against their will, but they will be permitted to follow their husbands if they so desire.

Richmond Military Hospital

Letter from the Richmond Union (Surrey) read stating that the Military Authorities have asked permission to remain in occupation of that Union’s Institution until 31st March 1920, and asking whether the Board will agree to such of their inmates as are Boarders at this Union’s Institution remaining as such until that date.

Resolved that the Richmond Inmates be allowed to remain at this Institution until 31/3/1920, provided the circumstances remain the same.

Minutes of Windsor Board of Guardians (G/WI1/26)

Dissent among the internees

Three Belgian internees in Reading were Fernand Donners, 23, a mechanic; Edgard Walravens, 35, a painter; and Roger Cornez, 30, motor mechanic.

4th January 1919

Cornez, Donners & Walravens (Belgians) complained of the remainder of the Internees’ treatment towards them, and asked if the Committee could have them removed to another Place of Internment or repatriated.


Reading Prison Visiting Committee minutes (P/RP1/6/1)

Reading School’s contribution to the war

A complete listing of Reading School’s alumni who had served in the war.

OLD BOYS SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES.

This list has been compiled from information received up to December 14th, 1918; corrections and additions will be welcomed and should be addressed to: – R. Newport, Esq., Reading School, Reading.

Allnatt, Rifleman N.R. — London Rifle Brigade.
(killed in Action).
Ambrose, 2nd Lieut. L.C. — S.L.I.
Anderson, Pte. L.G. — Can. Exp. Force
Appelbee, 2nd Lieut. T. — 13TH West Yorks.
(Killed in Action).
Atkinson, Lieut. E.G. — Indian Army
Atkinson, Capt. G.P. — 6TH Royal North Lancs.
Atkinson, 2nd Lieut. J.C. — R.A.F.
Aust, 2nd Lieut. H.E. — Yorkshire Regt.
(Twice Wounded).
(Killed in Action).
Aveline, Lieut. A.P. — Royal Berks Regt,
(Wounded).
(Military Cross).
Baker, 2nd Lieut. A.C.S. — R.G.A.
Baker, Rifleman A.E. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Rifleman R.S. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Lieut. T.H. — 8TH Royal Berks Regt.
(Wounded)
Balding, Capt. C.D. — Indian Army.
Banks, Pte. W.R. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Bardsley, Capt. R.C — Manchester Regt.
(Wounded).
Barnard, F.P. —
Barroby, Trooper. F. — Strathcona Horse.
Barry, Capt. L.E. — R.A.F.
Baseden, Lieut. E. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Baseden, 2nd Lieut. M.W. — R.A.F.
Batchelor, Lieut. A.S. — Duke of Cornwall’s L.I.
Bateman, Capt. W.V. — Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Bayley, 2nd Lieut. F. — Chinese Labour Battalion.
Beckingsale, Pte. R.S. — Canadian Contingent.
Beckingsale, Capt. R.T. — Tank Corps (Military Cross).
(Wounded).

Belsten, E.K. — R.A.F.
Biddulph, 2nd Lieut. R.H.H. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Died of Wounds).
Bidmead, Pte. — Wilts regt.
Black, Pte. F. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Blazey, A.E.H. — R.A.F.
Blazey, 2nd Lieut. J.W. — Royal Berks Regt
(killed in Action).
Bleck, Lieut. W.E. — R.F.A.
Bliss, 2nd Lieut. A.J. — Leinster Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Bliss, Pte. W. — 2ND Batt.Hon.Art.Coy. (more…)

Assistance of Germans and others in distress

It was very difficult for women to make ends meet if their husbands had been interned.

3rd December, 1918

Letter from Emergency Committee for the Assistance of Germans and others in distress read with reference to Mrs M Bartholomew at present in receipt of allowance granted by HM Government to British-born wives and children of interned Aliens.

Relieving Officer, 1st District, reported on the case.

Resolved that the relief granted Mrs Bartholomew be increased by 5/- per week for 4 weeks.

Windsor Board of Guardians minutes (G/WI1/26)

Members of Parliament stripped naked?

Even the Irish internees were being allowed short periods out on parole. The Governor of Reading Prison, not exactly a sympathiser, still refised to have them strip-searched on their return.

29 Nov 1918

F M Reynolds, Irish interned prisoner, was released on parole on 17 Nov 1918 and returned today.

No – these men on parole are not searched and the same procedure was [observed?] in [illegible] except a “special search” was made [illegible] was stripped. It would be of no use, and if this course was adopted there would be [illegible] of Members of Parliament stripped naked & c &c. Besides, these men can carry any mental messages they wish.

If the Commissioners wish it, of course I will specially search the men, but as they are on parole, I do not recommend it. At the same time, I have no doubt that many [do pass] messages & apparently written ones go [illegible].

C M Morgan
Gov
[to] The Commissioners

29th Nov 1918
Frank Reynolds

This Irish prisoner, who was released on parole on the 17th instant, returned to my custody today.

[C M Morgan]
Governor

[to] The Commissioners

29 Nov 1918
J. MacDonagh

Prisoner applied to me this morning for a petition to be released on parole on account of the illness of his brother.

He was given permission and I told him I would mark it “urgent” if the petition was sent in & he wished it.

He thanked me & left.

About 10 minutes afterwards he sent in a slip of paper requesting me to telephone to the Secretary of State and ask for him to be released on parole. I told the Warder I could not telephone to the Secretary of State, but would mark his petition urgent, and besides I had no knowledge of the case.

As no petition came from him this evening, I sent over to inquire. The reply was that as I had refused to telephone he would do nothing. I told him he could telegraph himself, but he refused.
I attach the telegram he has sent in.

C M Morgan
Gov

[to] The Commissioners

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

Working to be repatriated as quickly as possible

The question of hiow to repatriate internees was beginning to be considered.

HM Prison
Reading
Nov. 26. 18

From the MO to the Governor
Concerning the state of body & mind of Ion Perrocino [?].

He has maintained his weight on a special diet that I have allowed him. No doubt he feels the cold weather.

He is depressed about his internment and gets very excited when he insists upon discussing his return to Brazil.

He is evidently working to be repatriated as quickly as possible. I do not believe he will take his life or go mad.

His behaviour to myself has always been correct.

W T Freeman

Reading Prison
26 Nov 1918

Sir

Owing to the absence of Clerk & Schoolmaster Mr Stevens, through influenza, I was working alone for a fortnight, during which the error in W Horlock’s account occurred. I greatly regret the submission of this error, but I was working under considerable pressure and difficulty, and did my best to keep the office work going and to carry out what checking I could.

I am
Sir
Your obedient servant
M N Loarn
Steward

[to] The Governor

[The error related to a purchase of liberty clothing for the internees.]

HM “Place of Internment”
Reading

26th November 1918

Sir

I have the honour to acknowledge your letter … dated 21st November 1918 on the subject of the interned Alien Albert Hemmerle.

The prisoner states that the Duchy of Lichtenstein is at present in a state of revolution, but that he will write to his parents and request them to obtain from whatever form of Government there may be, the required guarantee that he will remain in Lichtenstein if deported there.

I have the honour to be
Sir
Your obedient servant

F G C M Morgan
Governor

[to] The Under Secretary of State
Home Office
London SW1

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

Welcome home after long and weary months

The first man to come home to Remenham was welcomed by the church bells.

On Saturday, November 23, our Church bells rang a “Welcome, home”, and we had the joy of seeing once again our Sidesman, Lieut. C Percival Holloway, after his long and weary months first of imprisonment, and, afterwards, of internment.

Remenham parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P99/28A/4)

Free to leave internment

The Cusden brothers from Reading had spent the entire war cooped up in a German internment camp. Now they were free. Albert was interested in the revolutionary movement and headed for a day in Berlin; back home he would become a member of the Labour Party, and 30 years later his wife Phoebe, as mayor of Reading, would welcome German children from war torn Dusseldorf to the town.

Spandau-Ruhleben 21 November 1918

Der hier internierte
A. E. Cusden & R. G. Arthur
Ist heute aus dem Englanderlager Ruhleben nach Berlin von neun bis sechs Uhr nachmittags beurlaubt worden.

Der Kommandant [signature]
Feldwebelleutnant

Der Soldatenrat

Pass for Albert and a friend to leave the camp at Ruhleben (D/EX1485/4/6)

The interned Germans and pro-Germans could hardly be expected to show much enthusiasm at the defeat and downfall of the Central Powers

Not everyone in Berkshire was pleased by the outcome of the war.

18 Nov 1918

Circular no. 172 of 14.11.18.

A thanksgiving service so far as it is applicable to this Place was held at both the RC service and that conducted by the Nonconformist Minister. There is no [Anglican] Chaplain.

I requested that the service should take the form of thanksgiving for the cessation of hostilities, without any reference to Victory as the Germans and pro-Germans who compose the congregations could hardly be expected to show much enthusiasm at the defeat and downfall of the Central Powers.

C M Morgan
Gov.

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

Christmas cards only

Irish internees were allowed to send Christmas cards.

4.11.18
[to] Governor
Reading P of I

The Secretary of State has decided to allow the Interned Irish Prisoners to obtain a supply of Christmas and New Years cards for the purpose of sending them to their friends if they so desire. The cards must be ordered and obtained by correspondence through the censor in the ordinary manner and then the time arrives they may be sent to the friends. These cards will not count among the number of letters allowed the prisoner each week and they must carry no communication beyond the printed greetings and the signature and address of the sender.

The cards permitted should be of a simple kind & printed on glazed paper. When ready for despatch they should be examined first at the prison and then sent in bundles bearing the label “Christmas cards only” to the Chief Postal Censor.

Sd A J Wall
Sec

A copy of this has been placed in the Sinn Fein prison.

C M Morgan
Gov
11/11/18

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

An impossible position

Yesterday the Irish internees had asked for their own doctor to be allowed to exercise his skills. Dr Freeman, the prison doctor, was against the idea.

H M Prison
Reading

Oct. 26.18

From the MO to the Governor

I certainly would not be answerable for Mr Hayes’ treatment and care of the Irish prisoners here. I am of course responsible for their condition.

Furthermore I should object to Mr Hayes interfering in any way with my stock of drugs here, and should decline to dispense for him. Such a position would be impossible.

If the Commissioners desire it, I should see no objection to Mr Hayes prescribing for his fellow prisoners if the medicines &c were obtained from outside, but even in such a case I decidedly think I should see and approve of all prescriptions.

W T Freeman

I can imagine the nature of Mr Hayes’ reports if he is allowed to send them to the Commissioners.


Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

There will be no volunteers during winter & spring

The authorities agreed that internees should continue to work in the prison garden – but would not let the Irish bypass the prison doctor, who they did not care for.

Commissioners’ Minute

Work in the Garden cannot be considered as the “Service of the Prison” and interned Civilians cannot be forced to work at it.

The punishment must therefore be cancelled.

JW
24.X.18

Noted.

Hitherto the service of the Place of Internment has been considered to be such things as are necessary for its ordinary upkeep, and consisted of – cooks, bakers, laundry, engineers’ party, garden party (the vegetables are grown for the Place of Internment only), cleaner, whitewashers, and this has been the practice throughout, men being paid according to the scale for each class of service approved by the Commissioners. Will the Commissioners please instruct me as to what is to be done about the garden? It grows a considerable amount of vegetables, but there will be no volunteers during winter & spring when all the digging & planting has to be carried out, and unless kept up, both it and the paths will be soon overgrown with weeds.

The garden party in the past also assisted the stoker with ashes, & in wet weather cleared out the basement.

My practice throughout has been for men to arrange for all the duties amongst themselves and no man to leave such employment until his successor is appointed.

I hope the Commissioners will not think I am saying more than I should if I say that I regret their present decision and inability to support me.

C M Morgan
Governor

25.10.18

The commissioners do not wish to alter the practice which has hitherto been in vogue at Reading, but digging etc in the garden was not included when Reg 9 was approved. As it appears to be understood that gardening is part of the upkeep of the P of I, the practice will be continued.
JW 30/10/16

25th Oct 1918

F. Thornton, Irish prisoner, applied today. He states on behalf of the Irish prisoners that Dr R. Hayes, who is an Irish internee, act as Medical Officer for them in place of the Medical Officer appointed for duty here, and that Dr Hayes be allowed to write to Ireland for his medical appliances. Drugs to be obtained from here.

Report from Medical Officer attached.

C M Morgan
Gov
[to] The Commissioners

The Commissioners are unable to sanction the proposal.
A J Wall
Sec: 30/10/18

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

“As the interned Irish prisoners refuse to put stamps on their outgoing letters, it has been decided to post them without stamps”

The officials at Reading had to give in to the Irish protests.

[to] The Gov

Please report how these [Irish] internees are now behaving. The Internees at the other Prisons have not given any trouble & it is hoped that things will improve at Reading without resorting to punishments, which would only exasperate the men & probably make things worse.

A J W
Secy
23/10/18

23rd October 1918
Reading

As the interned Irish prisoners refuse to put stamps on their outgoing letters, it has been decided to post them without stamps, and the recipients will have to pay the excess postage if they wish to have them.

The Censor has been informed accordingly, and you should send the letters to the Censor in future in the ordinary way. The two packets sent up by you have been sent on to the Censor.

A J Wall
Secy

Noted. Irish Internees informed.
Governor 25/10/18

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

Irish refuse to pay for postage

Irish internees protested against the censorship of their correspondence.

14 Oct 1918

The Irish prisoners stated today that after Monday the 21st they refused to pay for my postage of letters or parcels, as letters are not read here but sent in a covering letter to the Postal censor.

Instructions are requested.

C M Morgan
Gov
[to] The Commissioners

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)