The children’s 1st contribution to the War Memorial Fund

Maidenhead children started to contribute to a war memorial.

9th May 1919

The sum of 8/3 was forwarded to the Secretary, as the children’s 1st contribution to the War Memorial Fund.

Log book of King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1, pp. 444-445)

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Special classes for soldiers

Students were getting back to normal on leaving the army.

MAIDENHEAD TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

The Sub-committee understand that the Technical Institute will probably be evacuated by the Red Cross Hospital authorities shortly…

EVENING CLASSES

In a circular letter, the Board of Education urge the importance of the resumption of the part of this work which was curtailed owing to the war and of its further development at the earliest possible date.

The Sub-committee have not found it possible to resuscitate any of the closed classes this session but have made provision in the estimates for increasing the number of classes next session.

ARMY EDUCATION

In connexion with the scheme for Army Education, the Sub-committee have been asked to arrange special classes for soldiers at Windsor and these have been duly held. The whole of the cost is payable by the War Office.

COUNTY SCHOLARSHIPS

The Sub-committee have allowed B L James (3rd year Senior Scholar), who was released from the Army in January to resume his Senior Scholarship at the Newbury Grammar School for the remainder of its period.

M G Hyder, who was granted a Supplementary County Scholarship in 1916, has been released from the Army, and took up his Scholarship at Keble College, Oxford, as from the commencement of the Lent Term.

The Sub-committee have renewed the Scholarship of E H Austin (who has also been released from the Army) at the University College, Reading, until the end of the Summer Term.

Report of Higher Education Sub-committee to Berkshire Education Committee, 3 May 1919, in Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

A welcome to returned Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen of the Parish

Church of England Men’s Society

On April 29th, the CEMS decided to arrange a welcome to returned Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen of the Parish, on the Vicarage Lawn on Saturday, June 14th. It is hoped to have a concert, a band, and light refreshments.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, May 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

Ready for Peace or Empire Day, whichever comes first

Flagstaff

Mr Rogers of Furze Platt has kindly given the National School (Boys’ Department) a flagstaff. The boys, out of the profits of the School garden, have paid for its fixing and purchased a flag. So they are ready for Peace or Empire Day, whichever comes first.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

The first claim upon our offerings before even War Memorials

Parochial Church Councils, still the central meeting for all Anglican churches, were a post-war innovation.

The Vicar’s Letter

Dear Friends and Parishioners…

On Easter Tuesday [22 April] at 8 pm the Easter Vestry will be held in the Parish Room at the Vicarage; it will be followed immediately by the Easter Meeting of Parochial Church Electors. I hope for a very good muster at the Meeting, as if enough support is given, we hope to start a Parochial Church Council for this Parish. The Councillors would have to be Communicants, the Electors have to be confirmed and eligible for Holy Communion. If we decide, now our Sailors, Soldiers, and Airmen are many of them home again, to form such a Council, the Election would probably be held at a later date, probably early in May. The Council, like the Sub-Council or Church Committee at St Paul’s, would probably consist of men and women in equal numbers, but the Clergy and Churchwardens would sit ex-officio. It has been suggested that it might be a good thing if the various Church organisations were asked to nominate Candidates. For example, the Choir, Sidesmen, CEMS, Mothers’ Union, Sunday School Teachers, etc, might propose names. In this way we should get a Council that, while we hope it would still be ornamental, would also be useful. Please think this plan over.

Lastly, may I press on you the urgent need of supporting the Free-Will Offering Fund for the maintenance of the Assistant Clergy. We have (may I say what they cannot say?) most earnest and capable shepherds and priests in Mr King-Gill and Mr Thurland; but quite apart from any question of personal excellences, the first claim upon our offerings before even War Memorials or Parish Organisations is the proper support of the Ministry. I try to do what I can personally, sometimes I have to do rather more than I can afford. May I, therefore, with clean hands, urge upon every Communicant and regular worshipper the need, not so much of a large as a regular contribution to the Free-Will Offering Funds…

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar,

C E M Fry

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

The amount of work done, even during the last year of the War, when people were so short handed

Tribute is paid to the women of Furze Platt for their contributions.

Report of the Furze Platt War Working Party

In March 1918, a special appeal was made for funds to carry on the work at a time of great national danger. That appeal received a steady response all through the year, bringing in a total of nearly £60. When the accounts are audited a full report will appear in the press. In the meanwhile the details of the actual work done are given below.

1916 1917 1918
Bags 30 300 –
Bed Socks 78 219 310
Bandages 265 45
Bed Jackets 115 64 57
Helmets 73 7 34
Dressing Gowns 3 – –
Nightingales 10 18 –
Mosquito Nets 70 84 –
Mittens 53 135 236
Mufflers 6 68 264
Socks – 9 57
Shirts 29 26 –
Sun Shields 50 161 –
Anti-Vermin Vests- 112 226
Pyjamas – 7 –
Slippers 77 21 135
Swabs – 300 –
Helpless-case – – 25
Work Totals 859 1476 1354

Subscriptions: 1916, £64 12s 1d. 1917, £54 12s 1½d. 1918, £39 0s 4d.

The amount of work done, even during the last year of the War, when people were so short handed and had very little time to give to outside work, is a very great credit to the workers of Furze Platt. I should like to express on behalf of myself and all those interested in this work, our appreciation of all that has been done by Mrs E H Wyatt and the Collectors to make the Furze Platt District of the Maidenhead Branch a capable and reliable contributor to the Voluntary Work Organisations of the Country.

G M Skrine, Hon, Sec.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

That a Hall be erected in memory of those men belonging to or connected with Furze Platt who have served in the Great War

Furze Platt decided on a community facility as its war memorial.

St Peter’s Notices

A Public Meeting was held in St Peter’s Room on March 24th to receive the Report of the Committee which had been appointed to consider the form the War Memorial should take for the Furze Platt district. After some discussion the following resolutions were unanimously carried:

“That a Hall be erected in memory of those men belonging to or connected with Furze Platt who have served in the Great War, the said Hall to contain tablets with the names of all who have served and all who have fallen in the war.”

“That the title deeds of the Hall be vested in the Vicar and Churchwardens of the Parish, and that the Vicar should be asked to co-opt three outside people to co-operate with the St Peter’s Church Committee in the letting of the Hall on week-days, with the exception of Good Friday; that the Hall seat about 300 people; that the approximate cost be £2,000; that this sum be raised mainly by regular contributions.”

It is hoped that a desirable site might be obtained near the Church, and the Vicar pointed out that as the title deeds of the Hall were to be vested in the Vicar and Churchwardens of the Parish, there was no reason why the £300 already raised by St Peter’s people for a Parish Room should not be given to the fund for a Memorial Hall. The responsibility for rates and the upkeep of the Hall would fall on the Church Committee, but it is hoped that this would be covered by payments for letting the Hall.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

We may have a small Memorial Chapel to the Fallen

War Memorial Meetings

Fuller details will be published in the April Magazine. Probably in St Luke’s Church we may have a small Memorial Chapel to the Fallen; at Furze Platt a Memorial Hall.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

The difficult problems – International, Industrial, and Moral, that face our Country

The Vicar’s Letter

Dear Friends and Parishioners

May we all pray for a spirit of self-denial and sympathy, that we may understand the difficult problems – International, Industrial, and Moral, that face our Country, and for strength to play our small part in helping to solve them! I venture to appeal to all, especially to those Confirmed during the War, lads and girls alike, to remember that in partaking reverently and regularly of Holy Communion, they will get just that aid we all need to quit [sic] us like men and be strong. In Lent, there is an opportunity for a fresh start, let us see that we make it.

I remain, Your faithful friends and Vicar,

C E M Fry

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

Britain’s great army in “civies” again after their unforgettable experiences

Maidenhead men were coming home.

OUR SOLDIERS.

Britain’s great army, having gloriously accomplished its tremendous task, is being rapidly broken up, and already something like one-half of our men are demobilised. F.W. Harmer, R. R. Hill, J.H. Bolton, Harold Islip, Heorge Belcher, Cecil Meade, C.S. Vardy, C. Catliff, in addition to those who have been previously named, are in “civies” again, and others are shortly expecting their papers. Percy Lewis has been sent home from France, and is for the present doing duty at an Army Hospital in Camberwell. It is a great pleasure to welcome all these friends home again, after their unforgettable experiences.

Maidenhead Congregational magazine, March 1919 (D/N33/12/1/5)

Now that War Work draws to an end

Ladies’ Working Party

Now that War Work draws to an end, we are starting a Ladies’ Working Party. We hope to hold it during Lent in the Parish Room at the Vicarage, from 2.30 to 4.30 pm, on Wednesdays, beginning on March 19th… Will all ladies connected with St Luke’s willing to work please take this notice as a cordial invitation to attend.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

“We were very pleased that we spent those four terrible years in England”

The Van Hoof family, who had spent the war as refugees in Maidenhead, returned home.

OUR BELGIAN REFUGEE FRIENDS.

41, Kapelstraat, Boom,
Prov. (Anvers), Belgie,

March 8th.

Dear Mrs. Lewis,-

I am very sorry I have not been able to write before, but we have been so busy that we have not found time to do anything but arrange things at home. We spent nearly a week travelling before we were home. Before going on the boat we had to stay two days in London, which we spent in sight seeing.

We went on the boat about one o’clock on Friday, 28th, and started to sail about 4 o’clock the same day. The weather was glorious all through the sea journey, so that we arrived in Antwerp on Sunday morning about 12 o’clock. Before we were off the boat nearly an hour had passed. One of my uncles was there to meet us, so that it was quite 5 o’clock before we got home. You can imagine our relatives’ joy at meeting us again. We spent the whole of that day in talking, talking, talking.

Our home was quite alright, but the furniture and many other things that were in it have been stolen or else much damaged. The blankets you gave us have come in very useful, for they are things of the past here. The people have suffered very much, and the clothing has been so dear that they used to have all spare blankets dyed (for garments). The food is now much cheaper, about the same as in England, except the meat and bread. That is nearly twice the price as that in England.

We were very pleased that we spent those four terrible years in England, and by the help of the Committee we suffered nothing to complain of. Thanking you for your goodness towards us, and hoping to receive an answer from you,

I remain, yours faithfully,

J. VAN HOOF

Think of that from a little Belgian girl, who did not know a word of English when she came to Maidenhead!

Maidenhead Congregational magazine, April 1919 (D/N33/12/1/5)

A happy memory of life in a strange land

Maidenhead’s Belgian refugees went home.

OUR BELGIAN GUESTS.

Mr. and Mrs. Van Hoof and their two daughters left Maidenhead for Belgium on Wednesday, February 26th. A free passage was given to them by the Government, and all arrangements were made by the Central Belgium Refugees’ Committee. So ends an interesting episode in our Church life, one upon which we may look back with satisfaction. Our relations with these refugees have been throughout of the pleasantest description, and they were uniformly grateful for our efforts to make their lot in a strange land happy.

When we first resolved to be responsible for the care of a Belgian family, we thought six would be about our measure, but when a company of ten, all closely related to each other, was offered us, we accepted the larger obligation. They settled down in Fairford Road, which we furnished with borrowed furniture, in November, 1914. Six took advantage of an opportunity to return to their own land in September 1915, and we have had no direct word of them since, though we have heard that one of them, Mrs. Asselberg, shortly afterwards died.

Towards the cost of meeting their needs we have raised in all about £265, including £9 11 s. 11d. from the Adult School, and £2 6s. 1d. from the P. M. E. Society. In May, 1916, we ceased making weekly payments to them, though still remaining responsible for rent, coal and gas. Since February, 1918, they have been entirely self-supporting. At the end the Treasurer has about £6 10s. 0d. in hand, part of which sum will be required for carting back the borrowed furniture and cleaning down the house prior to giving up the tenancy, the remainder being given to Mr. and Mrs. Van Hoof. We shall hope to hear soon that our friends are happily settled once more in their own land, and that the four years and a quarter spent in Maidenhead are a happy memory.

Maidenhead Congregational magazine, March 1919 (D/N33/12/1/5)

We do want to commemorate the gallant dead

St Luke’s War Memorial Meeting, Monday, February 17th

May I summon all parishioners who can come to a meeting at 8 pm on Monday, February 17th, in the National School, East Street? I feel sure as citizens we shall all back up whatever the Mayor and his Committee decides on for the Borough, but as Churchmen in our Parish Church or elsewhere, we do want to commemorate the gallant dead, and show our thankfulness to God for the great Victory he has vouchsafed to our cause. Please attend in good numbers, both of men and women!

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, February 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

Rules in abeyance owing to the War should now be observed

Wartime conditions had ed to some cutting of corners.

14th February 1919

The Board of Governors of the Maidenhead Cottage Hospital feeling that the rule with regard to the opinion of the consulting Surgeon being sought in serious surgical cases, has been somewhat in abeyance owing to the War, now wish to call the attention of the Medical Staff to its observance.

Maidenhead.
14th February 1919.

Maidenhead Cottage Hospital governors’ minutes (D/H1/1/2, p. 370)