“Many a railway man in his heart loathed the unsportsmanlike order to stop work”

The country was hit by industrial unrest.

Rector’s Letter

My dear people –

As we assembled for our Evening Service on October 5 the glad news came that the Railway strike was over, and that the men would return to work as suddenly as they had left it. During the week of the strike prayer was offered by many that God’s Holy Spirit would grant “a right judgment in all things” to those concerned in the dispute, and the prayer was answered. We recognise the rights of Labour, and we recognise that Trades Unions have a legitimate place in the economic framework, but we do earnestly deprecate the short-sighted policy of “ca’canny”, which damages a man’s self-respect and destroys his honourable pride in his work, and we believe that many and many a railway man in his heart loathed the unsportsmanlike order to stop work suddenly, without even a few days’ notice, in an attempt to hold the whole community to ransom: by the splendid effort of all good citizens, high and low, rich and poor, the attempt did not succeed. Let us hope that wise counsels may now guide our industrial unrest towards and honourable and lasting peace, that will adjust the interests of individual classes and safeguard the welfare of the country as a whole.

Yours very faithfully,

George H Williams

Remenham parish magazine, November 1919 (D/P99/28A/5)

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Sick at the thought of how we are being let down at Versailles today!

John Maxwell Image was not optimistic about the future. His wounded brother in law was our friend Percy Spencer.

29 Barton Road
7 May ‘19

My dearest old man

Florence … wants to see her wounded brother who is still at St Thomas’s Hospital, poor fellow.

I feel sick at the thought of how we are being let down at Versailles today! Especially at the ingratitude of Belgium, and of Italy – the latter I have heard vigorously defended here. But Belgium!

And the Agitators in Britain!

And Shinn [sic] Fein impudence!

What a future lies before every one in England except the moneygrubber and the Profiteer and their lickspittles.


Tuissimus
Bild

Letter from John Maxwell Image, Cambridge don, to W F Smith (D/EX801/2)