A Peace oak in Remenham

The happy suggestion has been made that we should plant a “Peace Oak” in the field adjoining the School as a memorial of the close of the War. The suggestion has been warmly received, and the tree will be planted as soon as the suitable time comes.

Remenham parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P99/28A/5)

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After paying the expenses of the Peace Celebrations there will be a surplus remaining

There was a peace bonus for Burghfield children.

Peace Celebrations and War Memorial

The Committee appointed at the second General Meeting of the 17th June (see July Magazine) met on 14th August. The accounts will be audited and published in due course. But it may be stated that after paying the expenses of the Peace Celebrations there will be a surplus remaining. The Committee decided to allot £10 of this to the provision of suitable games, tackle and appliances for the use of the children in all the schools – the remainder to be added to the Memorial Fund.

Of this latter Fund it was decided that three quarters should be available for the provision and erection of the proposed Cross in the Churchyard, and one quarter for the sports and recreation grounds of the parish; and two sub-committees were appointed to enquire and report upon these two latter matters.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1919 (D/EX725/4)

“An exact copy of the single crosses which are to be erected in France and Belgium will link up our churchyard with the resting places of our gallant men who have fallen out there”

Burghfield planned a simple yet effective war memorial.

The result of the collection for the Celebration Fund and the Memorial Fund is not yet known as we go to press.

Until the amount of the latter at their disposal is ascertained, the Committee can hardly consider how to spend it. At present, as regards the Cross, the only suggestion made is that it should be an exact copy of the single crosses which are to be erected in France and Belgium, one in each cemetery. It is argued that this will, as it were, link up our churchyard with the resting places of our gallant men who have fallen out there, and will not be inappropriate for those whose deaths occurred elsewhere.

Burghfield parish magazine, August 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Any selfishness of any class must stand in the way of real peace and happiness at home

The vicar of Newbury urged a generous spirit in rebuilding national life, and thought servicemen should have first call on all jobs.

The long hoped for signing of the Peace Treaty has taken place, and the Nation has joined together in humble and hearty thanksgiving to Almighty God for His great and undeserved mercies. It is impossible to imagine from what horrors we have been saved by His goodness, and through the willing sacrifice of so many of our splendid men, and the courage and energy of millions, both men and women. If the terms imposed by the Allies on Germany seem hard they would have been nothing to the terms they would have imposed on us if they had won, and for generations our Country would not have recovered, if ever it did recover. Thanks be to God for His mercy to us.

And now we have to reconstruct our National Life. That is no easy task, and it calls for the spirit of willing co-operation and sacrifice from all classes. Any selfishness of any class must stand in the way of real peace and happiness at home. It is the duty surely of employers to give returned soldiers and sailors the first chance of employment, even if it means displacing someone else, and those who have fought and endured should have no just cause for grievances. The Government will have to put down profiteering with a strong hand, and should also severely punish the professional agitator and “him that stirreth up strife among brethren”. While all of us should do our best to spread the spirit of love and service. God has been gracious to us and now it is for us to prove ourselves worthy of His favour.

Sunday, July 6th, was observed as a day of Thanksgiving for Peace, and the services were well attended. The Municipal and National rejoicings took place on July 19th. There was unfortunately a lot of rain, and the children’s tea had to take place in different buildings instead of all together on the Cricket Field. The Procession in London must have been a magnificent sight.

The War Memorial Committee have had two meetings lately, the first with Mr C O Skilbeck to advise them, and the second with Mr Cogswell for the same purpose. They hope soon to have a design from the latter to put before the congregation and parishioners.

Newbury parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

The Peace Dinner is a success

An entertainment was offered to Wargrave’s ex-servicemen.

August
The Peace Dinner

It is proposed to entertain to dinner on Saturday August 2nd, all the men of Wargrave who have served their Country in His Majesty’s uniform during the war.

The dinner will be in the Woodclyffe Hall and will be followed by a Smoking Concert.


September
The Peace Dinner

A Dinner was held in the Woodclyffe Hall on Saturday, August 2nd, to which all the men of Wargrave, who had served their Country in His Majesty’s Uniform during the war, were invited. There were more than two hundred guests and the evening passed very happily. Fortunately the weather was fine, so that it was possible to get an extra table out of doors and people could pass in and out in comfort. Mr. Henry Bond presided. The usual toasts were honoured. Sir James Remnant and Major Howard Jones, D.S.O., responded for the guests.

The dinner was followed by an exceedingly good smoking concert for which Mr. A. Booth was entirely responsible. A large number of people had worked hard to make the evening a success and they were amply rewarded.

Wargrave parish magazines, August and September 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Simplicity, with enjoyment for all

Peace celebrations at Remenham were a glorified sports day.

REMENHAM PEACE CELEBRATIONS

Simplicity, with enjoyment for all, was the keynote of the Remenham Peace Celebration which took place, by the kind permission of Captain Eric Noble, at Park Place on Saturday afternoon, August 2. The funds had been provided by subscriptions given by a few ladies and gentlemen and the arrangements were carried out by Captain and Mrs Eric Noble, Captain and Mrs Eveleigh, and Mr Ansell, with Mr W Baker as hon. sec. The Band of the Henley Branch of the Comrades of the Great War was engaged for the occasion and discoursed a pleasing programme of music during the afternoon under the conductorship of Mr S Sheppard. A capital programme of sports had been arranged with Captain Eveleigh as handicapper and starter and Captain Eric Noble, Mr Ansell and Mr Baker as judges. Some valuable prizes were offered and the results were as follows:

50 yards handicap, boys 10 years old and under – 1st, G Gibbons; 2nd W Dixon; 3rd, A Moring.
50 yards handicap, girls 10 years old and under – 1st, Iris Humphrey; 2nd, Irene Ward; 3rd, Madge Langford.
100 yards handicap, boys over 10 years old – 1st, George Andrews; 2nd, Ronald Eustace; 3rd, Tony Christopher.
100 yards handicap, girls over 10 years old – 1st, Edith Rowe; 2nd, Phyllis Bonner; 3rd, Stella Dixon.
100 yards needle and thread race, boys and girls over 10 years – 1st, Elsie Fasenidge and George Smith; 2nd, Stella Dixon and Richard Gibbons; 3rd, Kathleen Ward and Ronald Eustace.
50 yards boot and shoe race, boys over 10 years – 1st, Ronald Eustace; 2nd, Richard Gibbons; 3rd, fred Smith.
Potato race, girls over 10 years – 1st, Olive Green; 2nd, Stella Dixon; 3rd, Ethel Stevens.
Sack race, boys – 1st, Albert Moring; 2nd, George Smith; 3rd, Richard Gibbons.
Egg and spoon race, girls – 1st, Annie Butler; 2nd, Stella Dixon; 3rd, Marjory King.
100 yards handicap, bandsmen’s race – 1st, A Why; 2nd, H Why; 3rd, R Cook.
120 yards handicap, men of the parish – 1st, Mr P Simmons, who gave up his prize to the second man W Eustace; Colonel Burnell took second honours and P Clarke, third.
50 yards egg and spoon race, women of the parish – 1st, Miss Froud; 2nd, Miss Marcham; 3rd, Miss King.

The prizes were kindly distributed by Mrs Eric Noble, who, on the proposition of Colonel Burnell, was accorded hearty cheers.

Tea was provided for the children and adults in the coach house, who greatly enjoyed the appetising meal. Amongst those present, in addition to Captain and Mrs Noble, were Mrs Heatley Noble, Mrs Goodrich, the Rector, Captain and Mrs Eveleigh, Colonel and Mrs Burnell, Captain A R Brakspear, Mr and Mrs Philip Simmons, Mr Stanton and many others. After tea, the school children who had been excellently trained by their head mistress (Miss Gale) rendered a special patriotic song, which gave much pleasure. Each child also received a Peace mug. Mr Baker proposed a hearty vote of thanks to the donors of the tea, and the subscribers, and to Captain and Mrs Noble and Captain and Mrs Eveleigh, for the trouble they had taken in making the arrangements. The proposition met with a most cordial response. Games of various descriptions and dancing were afterwards indulged in, and the happy occasion was brought to a conclusion by the singing of the National Anthem led by the band, cheers for Captain and Mr Noble, Mr and Mrs Heatley Noble, the Band, and all who had helped to promote the success of the occasion.

The Henley Standard.

Remenham parish magazine, September 1919 (D/P99/28A/5)

The victory year

Children must have been pleased by an extra week’s summer holiday as a peace dividend.

Chieveley Primary School
July 31st 1919

School closes today for the Summer Holidays. An extra week has been added to commemorate the victory year following The Great War.

Lower Sandhurst School
July 31st 1919

We broke up at mid-day for the usual summer holiday to be extended to five weeks in commemoration of peace.

Combe School
July 31st 1919

School closes Thursday July 31st for 6 weeks. An extra week has been granted as a Peace Holiday.

Hampstead Norreys CE School
31 July
We closed school today for 6 weeks. The extra week’s holiday has been given in response to the King’s request for an extra week in honour of Peace.

Log books of Chieveley Primary School (88/SCH/11/2); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL66/1); Combe School (C/EL15/2); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2)

Deferred from the preceding Wednesday in favour of Children’s Peace Celebrations

Tilehurst children enjoyed a rare day out as far away as Streatley.

SUNDAY SCHOOL OUTING

About 200 joined the party which journeyed to Streatley Hill on Wednesday, July 30th, on the occasion of the Tilehurst Congregational Church Sunday School Treat. This number included a most encouraging proportion of grown-up relatives of our scholars.

The outing, deferred from the preceding Wednesday in favour of Children’s Peace Celebrations, was fortunately on a worthier scale than has been possible since the war broke out…

Tilehurst Congregational Church section of Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, September 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Victory in the Great European War

Lower Basildon CE School
30th July 1919

School closed this afternoon for the Summer Holiday. The Education Committee have granted an extra week’s holiday, in accordance with the wish expressed by King George, to commemorate the Victory in the Great European War.

Aldermaston School
30th July 1919.

School closed at noon today for summer holidays, His Majesty King George has expressed a wish that in commemoration of the signing of Peace the children should be granted an extra week’s holiday.

Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School
31st July 1919

Peace Celebration sports were held in playground yesterday afternoon.

Log books of Lower Basildon CE School (C/EL7/2, p. 205); Aldermaston School log book (88/SCH/3/3, p. 108); and Newbury St Nicolas CE (Girls) School (90/SCH/5/5, p. 251)

An Entertainment at the Picture House to celebrate the Peace, and a tree in memory of the dead

Sunninghill
29th July 1919

The children have this afternoon had a tea at 4.15 & an Entertainment at the Picture House to celebrate the Peace.

Hampstead Norreys

A Parents’ Day was held on Tuesday 29th July …

The parents visited the horse chestnut tree planted on Parents’ Day last year in memory of old scholars who gave their lives in the Great War, and found it was growing well.

Leckhampstead
29/07/19

One week extra holiday has been granted to mark the signing of the Peace.

Log books of St Michael’s CE Mixed School, Sunninghill (88/SCH/32/3); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); Leckhampstead School (C/EL 51/2)

The happiness which the children were all expecting these first holidays of the Peace to bring

Clewer
Distribution of Prizes and Certificates

On Monday, July 28, the Rector of Clewer (the Rev. A T C Cowie) distributed the certificates and prizes won during the School Year. He then took the simple dismissal service, and gave a short address, in which he showed how the happiness which the children were all expecting these first holidays of the Peace to bring, depended on the spirit of unselfishness in their homes.

Speenhamland
July 28th

Letter from Office to say that an extra week’s holiday would be given this year in commemoration of the signing of Peace. We shall now re-open on Tuesday Sept. 9th.

Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1919 (D/EX1675/6/2/2); log book of St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

Signs of deep and earnest feeling do us all good

Ex-servicemen in Burghfield went to church to celebrate the end of the war.

Chapel Parade

On Sunday, July 27th, a considerable number of ex-service men paraded as on the 20th, and marched with the band to the Primitive Methodist Chapel, Burghfield Common, for a Peace Thanksgiving Service. These signs of deep and earnest feeling do us all good, and are welcomed alike by well-feeling Church-folk and Chapel-folk.

Burghfield parish magazine, September 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Through insisting on his teetotal ideas at the Peace Celebration Dinner, the vicar upset all the village and none of the demobilised men went”

The peace celebrations just over the Wiltshire border in Bishopstone were a damp squib with no booze.

26th July 1919

Wife, Marj. & I went to Shrivenham by train at 10 past 2 and walked to Bishopstone – Field Club outing. We 3 were the only ones who walked. The rest – only 6 of them, went on their bikes. We were there first. I found the Vicar making a scooter for his kid. The woman where we had tea gives him a poor character. When Harry Jones – who used to live here asked her how he was, she said “As silly as ever.” And through insisting on his teetotal ideas at the Peace Celebration Dinner other week upset all the village and none of the demobilised men went. Now they have 30£ in hand to spend.

Diary of William Hallam of Swindon (D/EX1415/26)

“Come to the cookhouse door, boys”: the long-hoped-for end of this weary and cruel struggle

Burghfield celebrated the end of the war.

Peace Celebrations

These took place on Saturday, July 26th, in fine weather and were a great success. The church bells were rung early in the morning, and at intervals afterwards. At 2.15 there was a short service, with a sermon by the Rector, in the church, attended by practically all the children from our four schools, over 260 of them, with the teachers, as well as many mothers and a number of ex-service men. The church inside was like a flower garden with the happy throng of young folk and their bright flags and banners and pretty dresses; but it was an earnest service too! The Burghfield Brass Band, under ex-bandsman W J Hathaway, late of the Royal Berks, met the long procession on the way from church, and played them into Hillfields lower park [the home of Mr Willink], where tents and a marquee (in preparation for the approaching Flower Show) had already been pitched, and were available in case of rain – which never came.

Sports for the children began at once, and at 4 o’clock they sat down on the grass to a good tea, after which the men’s sports were carried on till 5 o’clock, when 106 ex-service men, residents in Burghfield, were summoned by the now familiar “Come to the cookhouse door, boys” call, to an excellent meat tea in the marquee (provided by Mrs Sherval). Mr Willink said a few words of welcome at the end of the meal; but the fullest speech was well made by Mr Lousley, Chairman of the memorial and Celebrations Committee, later in the evening at the distribution of the sports prizes by Mrs Geoffrey Chance, when he gave a clear explanation of the aims and methods of the Committee, and thanked all those who had done so much for the Festival (except himself, who had as usual done his share and more), especially Mr H D Higgs (the Hon. Sec.), Mr Hannington, for conveying the Pinge Wood children; and Major Chance, Lieut. Searies, and Messrs E Lousley, Page, G Pembroke and Sheppard, with other teachers, as active members of the Sports Sub-Committee.

The day ended with dancing on rather rough sun-baked ground – but everyone seemed to enjoy themselves. Indeed there were no complaints all day, and it was a real pleasure to see so many friends and neighbours celebrating in such good fashion the long-hoped-for end of this weary and cruel struggle – yet those were not forgotten over whose lives the war has cast an abiding shadow. The Hillfields grounds were open during the day.

Burghfield parish magazine, September 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Preparation for the “Peace” Entertainment

Battle Infants School
25th July 1919

The Head Teacher was again out of school on Monday for about two hours making arrangements for the “Peace” Treat.

The School was closed on Thursday that preparation might be made for the “Peace” Entertainment, to be held for the children in the afternoon.

Notice has been received that the Summer Holidays are to be extended by one week in celebration of Peace.

Christ Church, Reading
25th July 1919

In response to the wish expressed by the King, that in commemoration of the Peace an extension of the summer holidays in all schools might be granted, the Education Committee have decided that an additional week shall be given to all the public elementary schools of the Borough which will therefore close this afternoon and re-assemble on 2nd September.


St Katherine’s, Clewer

July 25th

School was closed this afternoon for the Summer Vacation 5 weeks. An extra week has been granted to signalise the Signing of Peace after the War, 1914-1918.

Coley Street, REading
25/07/1919

School closes this afternoon for Summer vacation in response to the King’s wish of an extra week to celebrate Peace Year.


Log books of Battle Infants School log book (SCH20/8/2); and Christ Church CE Infants School log book (89/SCH/7/6); St Katherine’s School, Clewer (C/EL113/2); Coley Street Primary School Reading (89/SCH/48/4)