Special classes for soldiers

Students were getting back to normal on leaving the army.

MAIDENHEAD TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

The Sub-committee understand that the Technical Institute will probably be evacuated by the Red Cross Hospital authorities shortly…

EVENING CLASSES

In a circular letter, the Board of Education urge the importance of the resumption of the part of this work which was curtailed owing to the war and of its further development at the earliest possible date.

The Sub-committee have not found it possible to resuscitate any of the closed classes this session but have made provision in the estimates for increasing the number of classes next session.

ARMY EDUCATION

In connexion with the scheme for Army Education, the Sub-committee have been asked to arrange special classes for soldiers at Windsor and these have been duly held. The whole of the cost is payable by the War Office.

COUNTY SCHOLARSHIPS

The Sub-committee have allowed B L James (3rd year Senior Scholar), who was released from the Army in January to resume his Senior Scholarship at the Newbury Grammar School for the remainder of its period.

M G Hyder, who was granted a Supplementary County Scholarship in 1916, has been released from the Army, and took up his Scholarship at Keble College, Oxford, as from the commencement of the Lent Term.

The Sub-committee have renewed the Scholarship of E H Austin (who has also been released from the Army) at the University College, Reading, until the end of the Summer Term.

Report of Higher Education Sub-committee to Berkshire Education Committee, 3 May 1919, in Berkshire County Council minutes (C/CL/C1/1/22)

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On military duties in Egypt and Palestine for four years

One demobilised soldier got a short break before resuming work.

12th March 1919

Mr Howard, who has been on military duties in Egypt and Palestine for four years, has now returned to England, has been granted leave of absence until Monday March 24th 1919 when he will recommence his duties here.

Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School log book (C/EL72/3, p. 204)

Football with the returned servicemen

A group of demobilised servicemen wanted to play football with boys from their old school.

6th March 1919

About 16 old boys who had returned from military and naval duties visited this afternoon and asked that they might join the school football team in a game. An extra play was given in consequence.

Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School log book (C/EL72/3, p. 203)

Lining the streets in honour of the home-coming of the Coldstream Guards

The Coldstream Guards were coming home to their peacetime home in Windsor barracks.

Windsor
27th February 1919

The mayor asked that the boys and girls of the various schools might line the streets in honour of the home-coming of the Coldstream Guards. He granted all the schools a half holiday (school closed at midday in consequence).

Reading
27/02/1919

Absent by permission, having received an invitation to view the battle-ship ‘Renown’ at Portsmouth.

Log books of Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School (C/EL72/3); Coley Street Primary School Reading (89/SCH/48/4)

It has been decided to not “repatriate” the British born wives and children of enemy aliens against their will

Windsor had provided a home for the inmates of a Surrey workhouse during the war.

11th February 1919

Mrs Bartholomew

Letter from Local Government Board read, stating, in reply to an enquiry by the Clerk, that in cases where the husband of a woman in receipt of an allowance as a British-born wife of an interned alien has been repatriated, the allowance may be continued to the wife and children, also that it has been decided to not “repatriate” the British born wives and children against their will, but they will be permitted to follow their husbands if they so desire.

Richmond Military Hospital

Letter from the Richmond Union (Surrey) read stating that the Military Authorities have asked permission to remain in occupation of that Union’s Institution until 31st March 1920, and asking whether the Board will agree to such of their inmates as are Boarders at this Union’s Institution remaining as such until that date.

Resolved that the Richmond Inmates be allowed to remain at this Institution until 31/3/1920, provided the circumstances remain the same.

Minutes of Windsor Board of Guardians (G/WI1/26)

They cannot be demobilised in advance of general demobilisation

January 28th, 1919

Letter from Mr Gulliver, Assistant Master, read, stating that he is willing to resume his former duties as male Attendant, at the old salary, from the date Mr Lockhart leaves.

Letter from the Local Government Board read, stating that the Guardians’ application for the discharge from the army of Messrs Wood and Edwards, Porter and Labour Master, respectively, has been considered but they cannot be demobilised in advance of general demobilisation.


Windsor Board of Guardians minutes (G/WI1/26)

A war bonus of 20% on prewar salaries

The porter at Windsor Workhouse had had his job kept open for him.

Windsor
14th January, 1919

Letter from Mr W J Wood, Porter (now on active service) read with reference to Demobilisation and his return to duty.

The Clerk reported that he had informed Mr Wood that the Guardians had by resolution decided to keep his post open for him.

Resolved that no action be taken with regard to the Temporary Officer until the date of Mr W J Wood’s return is known.

Faringdon
14th January 1919

War Bonuses

Letter from Clerk to Guardians Wallingford. His Board has adopted a scale without waiting to call the proposed conference.

It was resolved to determine the question of the bonuses to be allotted to outdoor Officers in this Union independently.

It was accordingly resolved that a war bonus of 20% on prewar salaries should be granted to all the outdoor Officers to date from the 1st October 1918.

Windsor Board of Guardians minutes (G/WI1/26); Faringdon Board of Guardians minutes (G/F1/44)

Extra relief this Christmas in view of the cessation of hostilities

Paupers in Windsor Poor Law Union were allowed extra cash to celebrate peace.

December 17th, 1918
Extra Christmas Relief

Memorandum from the Local Government Board read authorising Boards of Guardians granting extra relief to recipients of Outdoor Relief this Christmas in view of the cessation of hostilities.

Moved by the Chairman.
Seconded by Mr Hamilton.
That to celebrate the cessation of hostilities and Christmas, all regular recipients of Outdoor Relief from this Union (excluding non-resident and non-settled cases) be granted during this week extra relief to the extent of 2/- for each adult and 1/- for each child.

Windsor Board of Guardians minutes (G/WI1/26)

Tomorrow’s General Election

The first election to allow women and all adult men to vote was looming.

Reading
Dec 13th 1918

School closed all day to prepare it for a Polling Station in tomorrow’s General Election.

Windsor
Dec: 13th

Mrs Baker still absent [with influenza]…

School closed on Friday as it was required for preparation for a Polling Station on Saturday in connection with the Parliamentary Election.

Log books of Redlands Boys’ School, Reading (86/SCH/3/30); Holy Trinity Infants School, Windsor (C/EL58/2)

Away with Influenza

Influenza’s toll increased.

Windsor
Dec: 6th

Mrs Baker absent from Monday noon, suffering from Influenza.

Peasemore
Dec. 6

Miss Jacobs, the needlework mistress, away with Influenza the whole of the week.

Log books of Holy Trinity Infants School, Windsor (C/EL58/2); Peasemore School (C/EL49/2)

Assistance of Germans and others in distress

It was very difficult for women to make ends meet if their husbands had been interned.

3rd December, 1918

Letter from Emergency Committee for the Assistance of Germans and others in distress read with reference to Mrs M Bartholomew at present in receipt of allowance granted by HM Government to British-born wives and children of interned Aliens.

Relieving Officer, 1st District, reported on the case.

Resolved that the relief granted Mrs Bartholomew be increased by 5/- per week for 4 weeks.

Windsor Board of Guardians minutes (G/WI1/26)

One little girl has died following Influenza

The terrible flu epidemic sweeping the world was continuing to make inroads locally.

1918
Nov 22nd

School reopened on Monday morning. Many girls are still absent with Influenza and Influenza Colds.

One little girl – Frances Clark – has died from Pneumonia, following on Influenza.


Log book of Holy Trinity Infants School, Windsor (C/EL58/2)

Cheers for the allies and the old boys fighting

Schools celebrated the end of the war.

Riseley Common
Nov. 11th

Acting on the assumption that peace has been declared (or rather an armistice arranged), as we could hear sirens sounding and church bells ringing, we have sung the National Anthem, “Praise God” etc.

St Stephen’s Boys’ School, Windsor
November 11th 1918

Armistice day.

Stoke Road School, Slough
November 11th 1918

School was re-opened this morning – 63% (194/308). The M.O.H ordered the school to be closed until November 18th.

During the morning I received the news that Germany had accepted the Allies’ terms and signed the Armistice.

The children formed a hollow square in front of the flag-staff, to which a new rope had been attached in readiness. The flag was hoisted by the youngest boy in the school to the singing of the National Anthem. The flag was then saluted and cheers were given for the allies and the old boys fighting. Edw. J Baldwin “shinned” up the pole to attach the rope. John Cross hoisted the Flag.

Sunninghill: St Michael’s CE Mixed School
11th November 1918

Beginning of Armistice. On the occasion of this I addressed the children, & hoisted the Union Jack. The National Anthem was then sung.

Stanford Dingley National School
November 11th 1918

Today, news was received that the Armistice was signed at 11 o’clock AM between Germany and the allies, this concluding the Great European War. After signing several National Songs concluding with the National Anthem. The children dispersed at 3 o’clock this afternoon.

King Street School, Maidenhead
11th November 1918

There were 107 children present this morning. The news of the signing of the armistice made a difference to the attendance this afternoon. 73 children present.

Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School log book
11th November 1918

News of Germany’s signing of the armistice reached the school at 11.10 am. At midday the whole school assembled and cheered the news after singing “God Save the King”. A half holiday was given by the mayor in honour of the great event.

Abingdon Girls CE School
1918, 11th-15th November

Children were dismissed at 3 o’clock on Armistice Day at the Vicar’s request.

Coleshill CE School
15th November 1918

On Monday (11th) when news of ‘The Armistice’ arrived the children sang ‘The King’ and saluted the ‘flag’ with cheers for our Army and Navy; they were then sent home.

Sonning CE Girls and Infants
11th November 1918

School closed in the afternoon to celebrate the signing of the Armistice.

Littlewick CE School
November 11th 1918

At 11.30 AM we heard bells and hooters going and knew that the Armistice was signed and that the war was over. The children cheered and sang “God Save the King” and Rule Britannia, and put up the Union Jack.

Buscot CE School
Nov. 11th

News that the armistice had been signed reached Buscot in the afternoon. The Flag was hoisted, cheers given, National Anthem sung and the hymn “Now thank we all our God”. The children were dismissed at 3 pm, and a holiday given next day Nov 12th.

Aston Tirrold
11th November 1918

We re-opened this morning after a closure of nearly a fortnight on account of influenza. Only 42 children are present out on 75 on roll. Just before noon the rector brought in the news that the Armistice had been signed. Secular work was suspended, and we humble fell upon our knees and heartedly thanked God for His great mercy vouchsafed unto us. A holiday to commemorate the Victory was given in the afternoon.

Braywick
11th November 1918

School opened again this morning [following closure for influenza] with a very fair amount of scholars and after consulting the doctor it was decided to mark register and proceed with usual work which was done accordingly. Peace however was declared in the morning and great excitement presided, many scholars remaining at home in the afternoon. School was resumed on Tuesday, the national anthem was sung, patriotic songs, flag waving etc and children kept quite excited.

Great Coxwell
11th November 1918

War Ended. Holiday in the afternoon to celebrate the great event.

Milton
Nov 11th

Re-opened again this morning [after closure for influenza] with 28 children, several still being ill. Heard in the dinner hour of the Armistice being signed, & gave the children the half holiday.

Log books of Riseley Common CE School, Swallowfield (C/EL99/3); St Stephen’s Boys’ School, Windsor (88/SCH/23/7, p. 167); Stoke Road School, Slough (89/SCH/28/1); Sunninghill: St Michael’s CE Mixed School (88/SCH/32/3); Stanford Dingley National School (C/EL21); King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1); Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School (C/EL72/3); Abingdon Girls CE School (C/EL 2/2); Coleshill CE School (D/P40/28/5); Sonning CE Girls and Infants (89/SCH/1/4);Littlewick C.E. School(85/SCH/5/2, p. 197); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2); Aston Tirrold CE School log book (C/EL105/1, p. 169); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 208); Milton CE School (D/P85/25/25); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2)Great Coxwell CE School (C/EL81/2, p. 83); Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School (90/SCH/5/3); Purley CE School (C/EL85/2)

“The Armistice was signed in a Railway Coach at 6 am this morning, but it is not to be made known until 11 so don’t tell anyone”

The stationmaster at Windsor, who had often come into contact with the Royal Family, got special advance notice of the Armistice.

On the morning of Nov 11th 1918 I had just started the 8.47 am train and [was] going back to my office when I saw HRH Princess Alice standing at the door and wondered what she wanted so early. When I reached there she said “I have got some news for you. The Armistice was signed in a Railway Coach at 6.0 am this morning, but it is not to be made known until 11.0 am, but I was sure you would like to know, so don’t tell anyone until then.” I thanked her for taking the trouble to come down to tell me and she returned to the Castle.

At 11.0 am the news was given out by the Mayor from the Town Hall.

Of course everyone was pleased and hoped there would never be another like it.

Memoir of S T Mann, stationmaster at Windsor (D/EX1915/5/14, pp. 127-128)

Turkey has given in completely

Germany’s ally Turkey surrendered. Meanwhile, at home, Ernest Gardner of Cookham, the sitting Conservative MP for Wokingham, would successfully stand for Windsor at the upcoming 1918 election, following a redrawing of constituency boundaries.

31 October 1918

Turkey out of the war!

Henry & I went off after early lunch to Windsor to nominate Mr Gardner. Lloyd George in chair. Good speeches. We had coffee & tea at Langtons & then walked on terrace. So thankful Germans had not destroyed it.

Heard Turkey had given in completely. We going to Dardanelles & Constantinople. They submit to all proposals.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)