Very successful work

Reading was hit by flu, with over 70 children from one school affected.

Reading
18th October 1918

There is an epidemic of Influenza – number on books 209. Number present this morning 135.

Braywick
18th October 1918

This week three afternoons have been granted for picking berries as the weather became fine and dry. The girls have been very successful at the work.

Hampstead Norreys
18th Oct 1918

The children have picked 168 lbs of blackberries during this week.

Boyne Hill
Oct: 18th

Notice has been received that this school is to be closed [for influenza] from noon today until Nov: 4th.

Log books of Reading ChristChurch CE Infants School log book (89/SCH/7/6); Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

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Black-berry picking in the afternoon

Oct. 17

We took the children for black-berry picking in the afternoon.

Peasemore School (C/EL49/2)

An epidemic of influenza

The dreadful flu epidemic hit Berkshire.

Abingdon
1918, 14th-18th October

There is an epidemic of influenza, poor attendance the whole of the week. Sent out notices of absence replies all reported illness. Only 99 girls present on Wednesday morning…

School closed on the 16th owing to the epidemic and reopened November 11th.

Hampstead Norreys
16th Oct.

School closed this morning for blackberrying. Children return to school for the afternoon.

Beedon
16th October.

School closed for blackberrying – 60 lbs gathered.

Boyne Hill
Oct: 16th

Dr Paterson has again been notified of the increasing number of influenza cases.

The PT [pupil teacher] was too ill to remain in school this afternoon.

Log books of Abingdon Girls’ CE School (C/EL2/2, p. 167); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); Beedon CE School (C/EL55/1); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

Blackberries are for soldiers only

Warfield children did their bit.

The Warfield School War Savings Association is progressing steadily, and the members at present have invested well over £400. The purchase of the 15/6 certificates, which in five years becomes £1 is a splendid investment, and the officials would greatly welcome new members; the minimum weekly investment is only sixpence.

The elder scholars of the Day school had the unique experience of Blackberry picking in school hours last week. Accompanied by Miss Leach they searched the bushes and succeeded in gathering 400 lbs. in the time allotted by the Education Committee. The berries were sent in the M.O.F. hampers to the local agent at Wokingham, as they are for soldiers only.

Warfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, October 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/9)

“We are particularly wishful to carry on the good work being done for our soldiers and sailors”

Fuel shortages were hitting home.

MINISTER’S JOTTINGS

We are likely to have considerable difficulty this winter with regard to our heating and lighting. We are not yet informed as to what our ration of coal, gas and electricity will be, but we are most anxious to prevent, by the strictest economy, any curtailment of our work, and we are particularly wishful to carry on the good work being done for our soldiers and sailors if it can possibly be managed. When we know what our allowance for heating and lighting is to be, we shall have to go more thoroughly into the matter. In the meantime will those responsible for the various meetings please see that no more gas or electricity is used than is absolutely necessary.

We are hoping to resume the Khaki Socials after worship on Sunday evenings at an early date. It is not easy to ensure a sufficient number of artistes to carry on this much appreciated work, but we trust it may be successfully accomplished once more this winter. We are indebted to Mrs Dracup and Miss Green for the splendid service they have rendered in this connection in past years.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, October 1918 (D/N11/12/1/14)

An Essay Competition on National Kitchens

Sunninghill
11th October 1918

During the past week an Essay Competition on National Kitchens was held, the prize being a War Savings Certificate offered by Miss Gibbons, Hon. Sec. of the National Kitchen here. 68 essays were sent in & were judged by Lady Askwith, who awarded the prize to Valentine Hullway – Stand. VI. She reported that the Essays reached a very high level, & as a consequence she gave 5/- in War Savings Stamps to the 2nd competitor, as did also Miss Gibbons to the next; the same lady also gave 2/6 to another competitor + Mrs Gibbons gave a like sum to still another.

Log book of Sunninghill: St Michael’s CE Mixed School (88/SCH/32/3, p. 232)

The picking may go on for another week, weather permitting

Braywick
11th October 1918

Only one afternoon was granted for food picking this week, the weather was too wet, and unsuitable. …

Mr Harris visited on Thursday to ask that the picking may go on for another week, weather permitting.

Maidenhead
11th October 1918

Many of the Jewish children are returning to London.

Warfield
11th October 1918

I have received the copy of a telegram from the Food Controller Reading asking us to continue blackberry picking as the fruit is most urgent.

Hampstead Norreys
11th Oct 1918

The children picked 192 lbs of blackberries during the week.

Riseley Common
Oct. 11th

A wet morning – several children are absent and the Head Teacher fears a return of Influenza.

Log books of Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1); Warfield CE School (C/EL26/3); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); Riseley Common CE School, Swallowfield (C/EL99/3)

To save coal is to save lives

The patriotic were urged to make every effort to save fuel.

THE COAL CRISIS.

At the request of the Controller of Coal Mines we bring the following facts to the notice of our readers in the confidence that we shall all do our best to help our country in this particular need:-

Coal is the very key industry of Great Britain and the Allies, and the outlook to-day is very much more serious than is generally realised. The causes of the shortage are:-

1. The call to the Colours of 75,000 miners to meet the peril of the German offensive in March; and
2. The almost complete stoppage of the mines in Northern France as a direct result of the German advance in the West.

Coal is the source of power; it makes gas, electricity and steam. It drives the ships and it drives the trains.

The coal of England must be shared with our Allies – France, Italy, and America. It helps them to move their army while in France and it keeps their soldiers warm.

It is sold to neutrals to buy shipping to bring American troops over and is exchanged for food which would otherwise go to Germany.

Coal is the source of power wanted to end of the war. Coal burned in a house in excess of absolute need is power wasted. It is, therefore, the duty of everyone to save coal, because to save coal is to save lives.

HOW TO SAVE COAL.

Mix coke with it; a third of coke will have no bad effect upon the fire.

Use fire bricks to reduce the size of the grate, or have a false bottom fitted.

Put the poker out of the way. Never let a fire burn fiercely. Use the small coal to damp down the large.

Keep your pans and kettles clean outside as well as inside. Dirt and soot absorb and waste heat.

Never use gas for cooking when the kitchen fire is alight. Do not light the kitchen fire for cooking when you can use gas instead.

Take out the electric light bulbs that are only a temptation. Put in smaller bulbs and smaller gas burners where less light will serve.

Never mend a fire late at night Take the coal off when you go to bed. Save the cinders.

Burn all your rubbish. Remember the dustbin often contains a supply of fuel of sorts. The kitchen fire will burn all sorts of fuel.

CARE AND COMFORTS WORKING PARTY

Donations received: Miss Bowyer 10/-, Miss Gilmore 3/6, Miss Bradley 2/6.

Things made: 4 white shirts, 12 pairs pants, 11 cushion covers, 14 treasure bags, 11 face cloths, 1 muffler, 1 pair gloves.

Reading St. John parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P172/28A/24)

Pray for Reading men

News of Reading men.

Notes from the Vicar

Intercessions list

Private George Palmer, Warwickshire Regiment; The Rev. Carey Cooper, C.F.; The Rev. Richard Alban Norris, C.F.

Prisoner
: Private A Bartlett.

Sick and Wounded: Private T. Tomkinson; A.M. Robert Bunting, R.A.F.

Departed: Privates Waters; William Neate; Mark Ewens; Pooley; George H. Hunt; Leslie H. Packer; Gunner G.W. Wall, R.F.A.; Harold Little.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P96/28A/35)

Closing this afternoon

8th Oct.

We have kept school open this morning, but are closing this afternoon for blackberry picking.

Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2)

Closed for blackberrying

Hampstead Norreys
7th Oct.

We have closed this afternoon for blackberrying.

Hampstead Norreys CE School log book (C/EL40/2)

Thanksgiving for the uplifting news from the fields of warfare

The Hare Hatch harvest festival handed over many of the gifts to wounded soldiers.

Hare Hatch Notes

Our Harvest Festival was held on Sunday, Oct 6th. The Mission Church looked very pretty. We had good attendances both at the morning and evening services, nearly every seat was filled. We had the pleasure of the help of the Rev. H. M. Wells, who celebrated the Holy Communion at the morning service. The chief thoughts of the day were Praise and Thanksgiving for the bountiful harvest also the uplifting news from the fields of warfare. The gifts, especially the vegetables, were more than we have had before, and the object to which they were devoted made these gifts very acceptable. The children’s contributions at the afternoon service of new laid eggs and vegetables were very pleasing indeed. The offertories throughout the day amounted to £3 8s. 11d. letters of thanks and appreciation have been received as follows: –

Thank you so very much for sending us such a splendid consignment of vegetables and also eggs. The onions are especially valuable and I was delighted to get some apples they will be greatly appreciated by the men. We have 45 patients to feed and I find they thoroughly enjoy the liberal supply of vegetables I am able to give them through the kindness of our friends.
Mabel Young, Quartermaster

The Secretary of the Royal Berks Hospital begs to thank you for your kind present of Harvest Gifts for the use of the patients.
A.E.C.

Wargrave parish magazine, November 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

For the duration of the war

The harvest was over.

Thatcham
October 4th 1918

The children were taken to gather blackberries. This will be the last time this season – 2 tons 9 cwt 1lb of fruit have been sent away.

Braywick
4th October 1918

Two half days were granted this week for picking berries and the girls got quite a nice supply.

Little Coxwell
Oct 4th

The children are going out to pick blackberrying [sic] for the last time. Registers not marked in the afternoon.

Hurst
4th October 1918

The school managers having given permission, the Education Committee has transferred me to the Three Mile Cross Council School for the duration of the war and Mrs Darlington has been appointed to take charge of this school during my absence.

Chilton
October 4th

A holiday given all day for the children to gather blackberries.

Log books of Francis Baily Primary School, Thatcham (90/SCH/15/1, p. 49); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 205); Hurst C of E Boys School (D/P73/28/23, p. 38); Little Coxwell CE School (C/EL80); Chilton CE School (D/P36/25/1)

Christmas gifts for our sailors and soldiers

Another Christmas loomed.

A meeting will be held in the Brownlow Hall, at 8 p.m., on Thursday, October 3rd, to arrange for the providing of Christmas gifts for our sailors and soldiers, for which object it is hoped that a Whist Drive will shortly be held.

Warfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, October 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/9)

£1000 in war savings

A war savings group in Wokingham reached a landmark.

October 2nd 1918

The amount collected in connection with the War Savings Account has now reached £1000.

Wokingham Wescott Road School log book (C/EL87, p. 187)