Two million men in all theatres of war

The wartime work of the Church army was spotlighted.

The Meeting in support of the local Church Army Hostel was held in the Council Chamber on November 5th, the Mayor being in the chair. The speaker, the Rev. W H G Shapcott, from Church Army Headquarters, gave an interesting account of the work of the Church Army for the soldiers during the war, describing how they had had to deal with two million men in all theatres of war, for whom 17 to 18 hundred huts had been in use. Thirty centres had now been started at home, the Newbury Hostel being one of these. He strongly appealed for local support for the Hostel and the Captain-in-charge stated what had already been done there. About £2409 has been spent on the Hostel, and £100 has to be spent, and it is earnestly hoped that the money will be forthcoming, both for this and for the maintenance of the Hostel.

Newbury parish magazine, December 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

Peace Decorations in the Mall

Boys from Slough witnessed an important Act of Parliament being passed.

September 2nd 1919

On Thursday August 31st the boys of the Gardening Class were taken to London. The trip included a visit to the zoo, a visit to the British Museum to see the illuminated manuscripts and historical autographs, the Peace Decorations in the Mall, and the House of Commons. One and a half hours were spent in the Gallery listening to a debate on Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Pensions. By good luck Black Rod came and called the Commons to the House of Lords for the Royal Assent to the Bill.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1)

Soldiers asked to give those who had been at home these last five years the benefit of their unique experience of men and things

Earley men were warmly welcomed home.

Sailors and Soldiers Entertainment

A very kind and liberal support in money and provisions removed all anxiety as to the expense of the entertainment given on Aug 30. Our only regret was the comparatively few were able to be present. The weather was cold and threatening, and though the sky held clear till half past six we were then driven to take cover in the parish hall when an enjoyable concert filled up the remained of the evening. The committee under Mr george Love’s management had provided a sumptuous tea at 4 o’clock, the hall decorated with flags, and the guests were entertained by Mrs and Miss Lawrence, Mrs Love, Mrs Weait, Mrs and Miss Porter, Mrs Edwards, Mrs Shackleford, Mrs Wilby, Mrs Long, Mrs Box, and Miss West. Games on the lawn with competitions and prizes had been arranged by Mr Love (chairman), and Messrs Sturgess, Wright, Weait, Long, Edwards, West, Porter, Lawrence, Shackleford, Clayton-Jones, Wilby and Cyphus. The evening concert was the contribution of Miss Elsie Ruffel, Messrs. O West, F L Wing, R Wing, A H Earley, HE Wilby, and CE Cyphus (Pianist).

Our guests were as follows William H Pomeroy, HMS Ophir; William B Waters, Royal Berks; G E Gibbons, R.A.S.C., M. T.; F A Charlton, R.E.; Harry F Fulbrook, 2nd Batt. Hants. 29th Div.; Vernon Truss, RAF; Albert H Barlow, 7th Queen’s R.W. Surreys; Chas. Shackleford, R.A.S.C., M. T.; H J White, RAF, E Henwood, 10th Tank Bat.; E J E Capel, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry; C W Green, RAF; O J West, HM Wireless Service; O H Long, 2nd O. Dorset Yeomanry; A W Long, R. A. S. C.; A H Earley, 219th Field Coy. R.E.; A G Earley, RAF; P G Canning, London Regt,; W H Andrews, Royal Berks and Tank Corps.; W G Ayres, R.G.A.; A J Franklin; G Gibbons; J A Earley, 1/4th R. Berks Regt.; C E Cyphus, Tank Corps.

At the close of tea the Vicar expressed the pleasure of the committee in welcoming the home-coming of their guests. He traced the steps which had led to this entertainment of them, and expressed his hope that they would gather together on more than occasion for counsel in the management of parish matters, and give those who had been at home these last five years the benefit of their unique experience of men and things.

The party dispersed soon after 9.30 after a thoroughly enjoyable time. We much regretted the unavoidable absence of Mr T R Stevens.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Takings for Victory Loan Week

Children were still collecting money for war related purposes.

Priestwood
8/07/2019

A half-holiday given this afternoon by chairman of the managers in recognition of the children’s effort at a special war savings collection. (£23.50)

Boyne Hill
July 8th

Total takings for Victory Loan Week amount to £21.17.7.

Log books of Priestwood Council Infant School (C/EL70); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

A devoted band of workers who came month after month so regularly to work for the wounded

Earley women’s work during the war was successful.

War Work

Mrs Norris wishes to thank all her devoted band of workers who came month after month so regularly to work for the wounded. Altogether 1,182 garments were sent in – everything well made, and appreciated at the Depot. We are thankful to have been able to help in this way.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, June 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Welcome Home to Returned Heroes

The men of Maidenhead were welcomed back home.

June
Welcome to Returned Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen by CEMS

On Saturday, June 14th, 5.30 to 9.30 pm, at St Luke’s, Vicarage Lawn. The Band of the Comrades of the Great War will play. if any returned Parishioner does not get an invitation, will he please communicate with Mr E Hazeldine, Hon. Sec., 5, College Rise.

July
CEMS Welcome Home to Returned Heroes

It was a happy inspiration of the St Luke’s Branch of the CEMS – which, of course, includes St Peter’s – to give a Welcome Home to the men of St Luke’s Parish, who as Sailors, Soldiers or Airmen have fought for their country in the Great War, together with their wives and sweethearts.

By the kindness of the Vicar, whose absence from home on such a memorable occasion was much regretted – not the least by the Vicar himself – the gathering took place on the Vicarage Lawn on Saturday, June 14th, and, favoured with brilliant weather, proved a great success.

When we say that 800 men and wives accepted the Society’s invitation to tea, it will be realised what a vast amount of work was entailed. But with the organisation in the capable hands of Mr Hazeldine (Hon. Sec.), and Mr Habbin (Chairman of the CEMS), and the willing help of many ladies of St Luke’s and St Peter’s congregations as waitresses, the large party was admirably served.
After tea, there were Concerts, a good programme of music by the Band of the Comrades of the Great War, and performances on the piano and violin by two wounded artistes, all of which was much appreciated. Between the various items were opportunities for conversation with, and congratulations to, the returned warriors – by no means the least enjoyable part of the proceedings – together with a further supply of refreshments. The heartiest thanks of the CEMS are offered to all the kind friends who gave them such valuable assistance in carrying through the “Welcome”, as also to those who generously contributed towards the cost.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, June-July 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

“There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease “

It was hoped that women who had worked together for the benefit of soldiers, might continue to help other deserving causes.

Crazies Hill Notes: Working Party

The Working Party which has done such excellent work during the war, was invited to a final meeting at Hennerton, on Friday, June 13th. There was a very large attendance and the weather was glorious. In the early afternoon the gardens were much enjoyed. Tea was at four o’clock. The party assembled afterwards in the drawing room, where Mrs Rhodes presented Souvenir Cards to all the members.

The Vicar in expressing the thanks of all concerned to Miss Rhodes for the very happy meetings which had been arranged, said that he had been asked to say that the members much hoped that Miss Rhodes would re-open the meetings in the autumn, and that they would be very pleased to work under her kindly leadership for any object she might choose.

This promises very well for the future. There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease altogether. Many people have acquired new habits of industry and there are many good objects which they could greatly benefit.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

A heartfelt “welcome back” to the men who had done and suffered so much for their country and for us

There was a warm welcome home for returning soldiers at Broad Street Chapel.

June

VARIOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS

It is proposed to give a “Welcome Home” to demobilised soldier and sailors connected with the church, in the Schoolroom, on Wednesday June 4th at 7 pm. A limited number of tickets for the tea and subsequent gathering will be sold to other friends at 1/6 each. Application for these tickets should be made to the Chapel-keeper or to any of the deacons.

July

“WELCOME HOME”

On Wednesday June 4th, members of the church and congregation assembled in the Schoolroom to give a cordial “Welcome Home” to men from the church and its various organisations who had been “demobilized”. About forty of these brethren attended, in response to the invitation which had been extended to them, and the whole proceedings were most enjoyable. At 7 o’clock the company sat down to a substantial tea which had been arranged by the wives of the deacons, and when the good things provided had been satisfactorily disposed of, the tables were cleared away for an informal meeting. Miss Vera Smith had very kindly arranged a capital programme of songs, recitations, etc, which were contributed by a number of her friends, and interspersed with the various items short speeches were delivered by several of the deacons.

The Minister was present, but owing to a relaxed throat, he was unable to speak. Mr Chas Steward Smith, JP, presided, and in fitting terms he gave a heartfelt “welcome back to Broad Street” to the men who had done and suffered so much for their country and for us. Other speakers in similar strain were Mr W. J. Brain, Mr Ernest Francis, Mr Swallow, and Mr Tibble. At the close, Mr W. J. Dance and Ex-Sergeant C. S. Stebbings voiced the gratitude of our guests for the welcome accorded them, and for the way in which the church had kept in touch with them by letters and parcels during their absence. The singing of “Auld Lang Syne” fittingly concluded a very happy gathering. Mr J Swallow was secretary, and Mr Tibble treasurer, of the committee which made arrangements for the function.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, June and July 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

The duty of the Mother Country to the Children

Colonial soldiers were welcome in the Hallam house.

4th May 1919

We entertained those N. Zealanders to dinner tea & supper. One’s name is Alford, the other Cleanwater – first time I’ve heard of this name. They are very grateful but as I tell all these Colonial fellows they must look at it as the duty of the Mother Country to the Children.

Diary of William Hallam (D/EX1415/25)

A Committee for “Welcome Home”

A Methodist Church in Reading welcomed home its men who had gone to war. The building is now the Sikh temple.

24 April 1919

Resolved…

That the following form a Committee for “Welcome Home”.

Messrs M Timbrell, A W Reed, F Charlton, H G Butler, W J Hambling, J S Neale, E W Butler, J Kimber.

Mesdames Slyfield, H J Butler, H G Butler, G Peach, H Gill, M Timmbrell, B Charlton, M Wise.

Cumberland Road Primitive Methodist Church, Reading: trustees’ minutes (D/MS55/1A/2)

No further appeal for vegetables is necessary

Another war hospital closed its doors.

Hare Hatch Notes

Congratulations to Corporal John Milford upon his having gained the Military Medal for Gallantry in the Field.

With the closing of the V.A.D. Hospital no further appeal for supply of vegetables is necessary. We desire to thank those who sent their gifts so regularly.

A.E.C.
Wargrave parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

The amount of work done, even during the last year of the War, when people were so short handed

Tribute is paid to the women of Furze Platt for their contributions.

Report of the Furze Platt War Working Party

In March 1918, a special appeal was made for funds to carry on the work at a time of great national danger. That appeal received a steady response all through the year, bringing in a total of nearly £60. When the accounts are audited a full report will appear in the press. In the meanwhile the details of the actual work done are given below.

1916 1917 1918
Bags 30 300 –
Bed Socks 78 219 310
Bandages 265 45
Bed Jackets 115 64 57
Helmets 73 7 34
Dressing Gowns 3 – –
Nightingales 10 18 –
Mosquito Nets 70 84 –
Mittens 53 135 236
Mufflers 6 68 264
Socks – 9 57
Shirts 29 26 –
Sun Shields 50 161 –
Anti-Vermin Vests- 112 226
Pyjamas – 7 –
Slippers 77 21 135
Swabs – 300 –
Helpless-case – – 25
Work Totals 859 1476 1354

Subscriptions: 1916, £64 12s 1d. 1917, £54 12s 1½d. 1918, £39 0s 4d.

The amount of work done, even during the last year of the War, when people were so short handed and had very little time to give to outside work, is a very great credit to the workers of Furze Platt. I should like to express on behalf of myself and all those interested in this work, our appreciation of all that has been done by Mrs E H Wyatt and the Collectors to make the Furze Platt District of the Maidenhead Branch a capable and reliable contributor to the Voluntary Work Organisations of the Country.

G M Skrine, Hon, Sec.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

The need for collecting eggs for the Wounded Soldiers in the hospitals in England and France has come to an end

Clewer had contributed thousands of eggs to help feed wounded soldiers.

Clewer

The following remarkable Egg Report has been sent for insertion by Miss Durant:-

Now that the need for collecting eggs for the Wounded Soldiers in the hospitals in England and France has come to an end, I should like to express my thanks to all those in Clewer who have so kindly assisted in the good work by giving eggs and money.

Since I commenced collecting in March, 1915, Clewer has contributed 7,890 eggs and £56 11s. 0d. in cash, and I especially wish to thank the children of Clewer Green Schools, who have collected 462 eggs and £49 1s. 9d. towards the result.

M. DOROTHY DURANT,

Collector for Clewer.

Clewer parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)

Energetic and continuous work for the Red Cross and St John’s Ambulance during the war

One Sulhamstead woman was central to the parish’s efforts to assist the wounded.

RED CROSS SOCIETY

Mrs Grimshaw has relinquished the tenancy of the Abbots House, to the great regret of all in the parish who knew her and Mrs Greenley. We hope that her five years’ tenancy has sufficiently endeared her to the neighbourhood to bring her repeatedly back on visits.

Mrs Grimshaw’s work for the Red Cross and St John’s Ambulance during the war has been energetic and continuous. Since she was first appointed as Village Representative, her small group of workers were kept steadily employed, and produced a good number of garments. During the last year upwards of 120 garments were dispatched to the Depot. Mrs Sheringham, Mile House, has undertaken the work as the Village Representative.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

“It has helped in a small way a great patriotic movement”

Time had come for one War Savings Associaton to fold.

ST JOHN’S PARISH WAR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

There being now so few members paying in, it is proposed to make a change by asking those few remaining members to join with the GFS Association…

Our St John’s Parish Association has been in existence nearly two years. It was affiliated to the Reading Centre on 7th March 1917, though it did not begin working till a month later.

In that period 127 Single Payment Certificates and 50 by instalment payments have been issued at a cost of £137 3s 6d, with withdrawals amounted to 18/-, leaving a balance in hand in Certificates and Cash of £2 18s 0d.

The total number who joined was 42, but only 6 are now paying-in members.

The represents, of course, only a small part of the support given to the War Savings effort in the parish. The Association was started late, so that the schools and other Associations absorbed the larger amount of the savings, but it has helped in a small way a great patriotic movement.

Reading St. John parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P172/28A/24)