Takings for Victory Loan Week

Children were still collecting money for war related purposes.

Priestwood
8/07/2019

A half-holiday given this afternoon by chairman of the managers in recognition of the children’s effort at a special war savings collection. (£23.50)

Boyne Hill
July 8th

Total takings for Victory Loan Week amount to £21.17.7.

Log books of Priestwood Council Infant School (C/EL70); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

Advertisements

Special lessons on “The Empire” and “Patriotism”

The war continued to inform Empire Day celebrations in Berkshire schools.

Slough
May 23rd 1919

Celebration of Empire Day.

Empire lessons were given throughout the school.

A hollow square was formed in the playground and the flag was hoisted while the National Anthem was being sung.

The Chairman Mr Andrews, the Revd Theo Cousens and Mr Frank Smith addressed the children, the subject being the Empire and its builders.

Patriotic Songs were sung and the school was dismissed for a half holiday.

St Peter’s CE School, Earley
23rd May 1919

This being Empire Day, the ordinary timetable lessons were not taken, but special lessons on “The Empire” and “Patriotism” were given throughout the school, and at 11 a.m. the whole of the children were assembled around the school flagpole, and the vicar raised the Union jack amid great cheering from the scholars & the assembled parents and parishioners. Canon Fowler, Mr R Lea & Miss Weldon made patriotic speeches, & the children sang some appropriate songs.

In the afternoon the usual May Day Festival was held at 3 p.m….

At the close of the proceedings, a collection, amounting to £3.1.5 was made, the money to go towards an “Honour” board for Earley school-boys who have fallen in the war.

Ascot Heath Boys’ School
May 23rd 1919

Empire Day was celebrated at 2.30 p.m. in the presence of many parents and Friends. Sir Neville Chamberlain R.C.B. addressed the Children on the “Meaning of Empire” and “Our Duty Towards It”.

Ascot Heath Girls School
23rd May 1919

The children assembled in the Boys field and were addressed by Sir Neville Chamberlain.

Priestwood
23/05/1919

Special lessons have been given this week to prepare for Empire Day. This morning at 11.30 and this afternoon at 3pm parade, demonstration consisting of appropriate songs renditions took place in the playground.

Reading Christ Church CE Infants School
23rd May 1919

Tomorrow (Saturday) being Empire Day, the National Anthem was sung this morning, and the flag saluted by all the children, who listened to an interesting address by Captain Wing. The lessons during the morning were on Empire Day.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1); St Peter’s CE School, Earley: log book (SCH36/8/3); Ascot Heath Boys’ School log book (C/EL110/4); Ascot Heath Girls School log book (C/EL109/2); Priestwood Council Infant School (C/EL70); Reading Christ Church CE Infants School log book (89/SCH/7/6)

Blinded soldiers turn to chicken rearing

Berkshire County Council and its committees dealt with several war related matters. One was the registration of the multitude of independent war charities which had sprung up.

Report of School Management Sub-committee, 14 October 1916

HEAD TEACHERS AND MILITARY SERVICE

The following Head Teachers have rejoined the Army since the last meeting: Mr Mills (Childrey), Mr Hunt (Cold Ash), Mr Bird (Priestwood), Mr Andrews (Mortimer St Mary’s) and Mr Verrall (Brimpton). Their places have been filled temporarily by the appointment of the Certificated Assistant (Woman) of their respective schools, or by the transfer of a teacher from another school.

Report of Smallholdings and Allotments Committee, 14 October 1916

COTTAGES AND LAND FOR BLINDED SOLDIERS, &C, FOR POULTRY FARMING

Enquiries were made on behalf of the Blinded Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Hostel, St Dunstan’s, as to whether any assistance could be given in finding locations near Reading for Blinded Soldiers who have been taught chicken rearing. They require a cottage and about an acre of ground at a rent not exceeding £30 per annum.

The agents in the Reading district were asked if they had any suitable properties available, but from the replies received it appeared that no suitable places were available for renting, and only three or four were put forward for sale.

It was stated by St Dunstan’s that at present only leasing could be considered.

Report of the War Charities Committee, 14 October 1916

The following applications for registration under the War Charities Act, 1916, have not been approved, and the Clerk instructed to issue certificates and to notify the Charity Commissioners: (more…)

A head teacher rejoins the army

An Easthampstead head teacher left education for the army.

August 4th 1916
D. H. Bird gives up charge of this school temporarily upon his rejoining the army.

Priestwood School log book (C/EL69, p. 183)

Remember the brave and true, and give them rest

Bracknell mourned the loss of several of its soldiers, and the serious injury of others.

THE WAR
THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

The following prayer from a Russian Liturgy will be valued by many at this time.

“Remember all those, the brave and true, who have died at the death of honour and are departed in the hope of resurrection to eternal Life. In that place of light, whence sorrow and mourning are far banished, give them rest O Lord, the Lover of man. Grant this O Lord.”

* * *
Lieut. William A. P. Foster, the elder son of Sir William and Lady Foster, has died of wounds received in action at Frankfurt in Germany. He was in the South Staffordshire Regiment and came back from South Africa in September and went out on the 4th of October to join the Army on Active Service. After three or four weeks of strenuous service he was wounded on October 31st and fell into the hands of the enemy, and now the sad news has come that he died of his wounds in November 11th. Since he joined the Army he has served mostly abroad, but we have seen him from time to time when he has been home at Priestwood House, and he was greatly loved, not only by his fellow soldiers, but by all who knew him.

Another of our Bracknell men has fallen, Frederick Butler. He rejoined the Army at the beginning of the war; he had served in the South African war and had two medals. The news of his death reached Bracknell on November 16th but he was killed on October 21st.

We also deeply regret the loss of Sub-Lieut. Charles Van Neck, the youngest son of Mrs. Van Neck, late of Lily Hill. He was a most promising young officer and fell on October 24th. Mrs Van Neck’s eldest son is also amongst the “missing.”

Amongst the wounded form this Parish are Lieut. Warren Mackenzie, who we are glad to say is reported to be doing well; he is at present in hospital in France. George Clarke, who is in the Reading hospital. Harry Hollingsworth, who some weeks ago was reported to be wounded, but of whom no further news has yet come through. H. Downham, who has been in hospital in Newcastle. Henry Barlow, who is at Chatham. Harry Matthews, who is in France, and according to his own account, “going on grand.” Another young soldier, Harry Loader, whose family lived until lately here, is also reported to be wounded; he is in the hospital at Dewsbury.

Mrs. Alfred Isaacs, whose husband was reported to be missing weeks ago, has now received a letter from him telling her that he has been wounded and captured; he has now recovered from his wounds and is a prisoner in Germany.

Lieut. Norman Johnston who was slightly wounded has come home. William Notley is also at home minus a finger, and Arthur Richardson is wounded and in France.

FOREIGN MISSIONS.
There is to be a Sale of Work (consisting of useful articles for Sailors, Soldiers, Refugees and Children) at the Parish Room at the Vicarage on Tuesday, December 6th, from 2.30 to 6 p.m., the proceeds of which will be given to Missions.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/12)