“There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease “

It was hoped that women who had worked together for the benefit of soldiers, might continue to help other deserving causes.

Crazies Hill Notes: Working Party

The Working Party which has done such excellent work during the war, was invited to a final meeting at Hennerton, on Friday, June 13th. There was a very large attendance and the weather was glorious. In the early afternoon the gardens were much enjoyed. Tea was at four o’clock. The party assembled afterwards in the drawing room, where Mrs Rhodes presented Souvenir Cards to all the members.

The Vicar in expressing the thanks of all concerned to Miss Rhodes for the very happy meetings which had been arranged, said that he had been asked to say that the members much hoped that Miss Rhodes would re-open the meetings in the autumn, and that they would be very pleased to work under her kindly leadership for any object she might choose.

This promises very well for the future. There has been so much voluntary work done during the war and so much interest taken in it, that it would be a great pity if it were to cease altogether. Many people have acquired new habits of industry and there are many good objects which they could greatly benefit.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Advertisements

Such very substantial help to our Hospitals

League of Mercy

Miss Brenda Rhodes, a Vice-President of the League, desires to thank the numerous contributors who have subscribed during 1918, and have enabled her to send such very substantial help to our Hospitals. The Flag and Heather Day produced £78 7s. 4d. Annual subscriptions £23 8s. 6d. Total £104 19s. 10d.

Wargrave parish magazine, January 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

This splendid cause

Crazies Hill people continued to do what they could to help wounded and disabled soldiers.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Women’s War Working Party has again resumed its activities, under the direction of Miss Rhodes, and a band of loyal workers meets every Wednesday afternoon, to help forward this splendid cause.

A most successful Whist Drive was held on Wednesday, Nov 20th, the proceeds being devoted to the aid of S. Dunstan’s Hostel for blinded soldiers and sailors.

The amount raised, £16, 10s, 0d. was due in large measure to the energetic labours of Mr. H. Woodward, who secured donations to the amount of £5, 18s, 9d. The Sale of tickets and cash taken at the door amounted to £5, 8s, 9d. and a prize draw realized £5, 2s, 6d. The prizes were kindly given by several friends, so that expenses were nil.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

“I do not mind the occasional attacks from a few troublesome men”

Internee Bernard Rohls had made a complaint about his treatment, which he thought unfair compared to that of others allowed to exercise their trades. The Governor’s response gives an insight into the activities undertaken by internees.

20 April 1918
B H Rohls

I have little to add to my report of 28.3.18.

The majority of Rohls’s statements are utterly untrue – or at any rate their inference is.

To take the men he mentions –

Rhodes was allowed by the Commissioners to do fretwork, the tools being kept by the Chief Warder, issued daily and locked up at night. The reason he was allowed this work was that he had been in an asylum, was highly excitable, and it was done to keep him occupied. He left here 21.9.16.

Propper worked as a tailor – tools a sewing machine.

Mullinger as a knitter – tools a knitting machine.

Le Corty as a painter – tools brush & palette.

Shacken in Engineer’s party – tools pocket knife.

Delfosse as cleaner – tools pocket knife.

If there are any other tools they are successfully concealed. Many men made trinket boxes &c with their knives, and Rohls can do the same if he wishes. No man has been allowed to sell any outside – though they do to one another.

At present there are 6 chairs & about 20 stools broken. The Amateur repairing them is the Engineer of the Prison. Rhodes asked to be allowed to make artificial limbs for Red Cross, but it was disallowed by the Commissioners. I have no record of Rohls asking the same thing, but if he did, he would receive the same reply.

The statement regarding “Pack of Aliens” I need hardly say is untrue. I do not express all my thoughts to these men.

With the exception of the work and conditions stated in my last report, Rohls has never done or tried to do any work.

Personally I do not mind the occasional attacks from a few troublesome men the least – but I think from a discipline point of view some notice should be taken of utterly untrue, and known to be untrue, statements made against the head of an Establishment.

C M Morgan
Governor

[to]
The Commissioners

Reading Prison [Place of Internment] letter book (P/RP1/8/2/1)

Holding our own!

A friend encouraged Florence Vansittart Neale that the situation was not as dire as feared. It was possibly Captain Hubert Victor Rhodes, from Henley, whose wife came from Marlow.

27 March 1918
Cheering talk with Victor Rhodes. Are holding our own!

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

Voluntary workers get badges

Ladies from Crazies Hill were honoured for their hard work sewing and knitting for the wounded.

Crazies Hill Notes

With reference to the Working Party, Miss Rhodes has kindly forwarded the following:-

The Director General of Voluntary Organizations has issued Voluntary Workers’ Badges to the following members of the Crazies Hill Working Party who are entitled to a Badge, under the rules of the Association:-

Mrs. French Miss Kate Willis
Mrs. Whiting Miss Fleming
Mrs. Light Miss A. Fleming
Mrs. Waldron Mrs. Barfoot
Mrs. Habbits Mrs. Norris
Mrs. Stephens Miss Goodall
Mrs. King Mrs. Huckle
Miss Rose Mrs. Rhodes
Miss Mary Rose Miss Rhodes
Miss Beck

A letter received from the Secretary of the Hon. Lady Monro’s Hospital Depot says:

“Will you congratulate your workers for the splendid way in which they have worked and for the quality and quantity of their work and that we shall expect and hope for their help next winter. The following is a list of the things made:-

Pyjamas 132
Slippers 28
Mufflers 24
Slings 18
Socks 7 pairs
Mittens 13 pairs
Bed Socks 3 pairs
Helmets 112
Swabs 11
Bed Jackets 11
Treasure Bags 30

Sent to Bartholomews Hospital:-
4 Bed Jackets
13 Bed Gowns.”

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Good work on Wednesdays

Women in Wargrave were helping a war hospital in south London.

The Working Party continues to do good work on Wednesday afternoons. The work is sent to Wandsworth War Hospital where there are at least one thousand wounded soldiers. All are very grateful to Miss Rhodes who successfully carries on this excellent work and who devotes so much time and energy to it.

Wargrave parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

A call for economical but wholesome recipes

The vicar of Wargrave was at the heart of the village’s flourishing War Savings Association, and also efforts to encourage food to be produced locally. The March issue of the parish magazine announced:

War Savings and War Rations

A meeting of the Wargrave War Savings Association will be held on Saturday, March 10th at 7 .p.m., in the Iron Church Building. All Parishioners are most cordially invited to attend. The subject of War Rations will also be discussed.

The total sum paid into the Secretary’s hands up to February 26th, amounts to £1014 9s. 6d., which has been extended in the purchase of 726 Certificates value £1 five years hence; 21 value £12 five years hence: and 13 value £25 five years hence.

Bonus

There is no doubt that the Chairman’s kind gift of one sixpenny coupon on every Certificate up to ten has proved a strong inducement to save that number. And he is so pleased with the response that he has most generously determined to extend his offer up to 25 Certificates for each person.

Vicarage Office Hours

On Saturdays 9.30-10.30 .a.m. and 5.30-6.30 .p.m. the Parish Room is open for War Savings Business.

Certificates due members may then be obtained, and Certificates may be purchased.

During the days of the War Loan the Vicar was glad to welcome War Savings business on any day and at any time when he was at home, but he must now ask members to be more particular in the observance of Office Hours.

Money may be sent to the Vicar if accompanied with a clear statement of Certificates required, full names and sufficient postal address.

The meeting duly took place:

War Savings Association

A very well attended Meeting was held on Saturday, March 10th, in the Iron Church Building. Mr. Bond presided and gave an address on Food Production and War Rations.

A Committee was appointed for Food Production of which Mrs. Bulkeley is Chairman, supported by Mrs. Hinton, Miss. Rhodes, and Messrs. Butcher, Chenery, Crisp and Pope.

A good deal of work has already been done in organising parties to dig, and in providing allotments and seed potatoes for those who want them.

A Committee was also appointed for Food Economy in charge of Mrs. Winter, supported by Mrs. Bennett, Mrs. Cain, Mrs. Chenery, and Mrs. Hermon.

It is hoped that the committee may give much help in disseminating information and enlisting support. Mrs. Winter will be very grateful for any economical recipes which have proved wholesome and successful. These recipes will be exhibited in the Parish Room.

Wargrave parish magazine, March and April 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Sending dressings right out to the firing line

People in the villages of Wokingham Rural District gave their money generously, while those in Wargrave were proud to know that their handmade surgical dressings were being put to use at the front where they were most urgently needed.

Our Day

Very hearty congratulations and our best thanks are due to Mrs. Oliver Young and all her collectors, for the splendid contribution sent this year from the district to the British Red Cross Society and the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. The Cheque sent to the County Secretary from the Wokingham North District was for £168. 10s. 1d. and was made up as follows:-

£. s. d.
Wargrave per Mrs. Victor Rhodes: 19 3 2
Wargrave per Mrs Vickerman 36 0 0
Hare Hatch per Mrs. A. W. Young 20 7 2
Twyford per Mrs. F. C. Young 23 4 0
Remenham and Crazies Hill per Mrs. Noble 21 1 7
Mr. Noble per Mrs. Noble 20 0 0
Sonning per Miss Williams 13 0 0
Woodley per Miss Pantin 3 6 2
Hurst per Mrs. Roupell 12 8 0

£168 10 1

Wargrave Surgical Dressing Emergency Society

Since March 23rd, 1915 over 300 Bales of dressings and comforts have been sent to Casualty Clearing Stations in France, Malta, Egypt, Alexandria and Port Said. The Society is now approved by the War Office, and properly licensed under the New War Charity Act. In future it is intended to print the hospitals where dressings are sent every month, in the Parish Magazine, as it cannot fail to be a source of satisfaction to know that while the Hospital is doing all it can for the men who have come back, the Surgical Dressing Society is sending every month about 20 Bales right out to the Firing Line, for the use of the men who come out of the trenches on the field of Battle.

List of Hospitals for October and November:

B. Ex. F. France:
No. 5, Casualty Clearing Station
No. 27, Field Ambulance – 9th Scottish Section
No. 3, Canadian Casualty Clearing Station

Egypt:
No. 19 General Hospital, Alexandria
No. 31, General Hospital, Port Said

These Hospitals have 4 Bales of Dressings etc. each:
No. 21 Casualty Clearing Station
No. 5 Casualty Clearing Station
No. 2/2d London Casualty Clearing Station
No. 1/1 Midland D. Casualty Clearing Station
British Exped. Force, France.

4 Bales each.

By order of the Director General. Vol. Organizations
Scotland Yard.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Family photographs at the Front

The YMCA had a heartwarming scheme to send photographs of family members to soldiers, many of whom came from poor families with no access to luxury goods like cameras.

Snapshots from Home

The Y.M.C.A. have enlisted a vast number of people to help in taking photographs of home scenes, to send to Soldiers at the Front. A photograph of wife or child must be a very pleasing addition to a letter from home and is, no doubt, greatly treasured. If anyone with a camera would like to lend a hand in Wargrave there would be plenty to do, either informally or under the Y.M.C.A organisation.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Working Party has been discontinued for the summer. We are very much indebted to Miss. Rhodes who carried on this work throughout the winter months. We are also indebted to Mrs. Rhodes who so generously provided tea each week for those who came. This kind act was greatly appreciated. In a letter we have received, Miss. Rhodes says: –

“The Working Parties have been a great success and no end of good work done; and I have had most grateful letters of thanks from St Bartholomew’s Hospital, The War Hospital, Wandsworth, and the Ladies’ Linen League, Royal Berkshire Hospital, and much praise on the quality of the work.”

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Songs of a patriotic and martial character

Wargrave children both entertained wounded soldiers and raised money for them.

The Children’s Concerts

The Concerts annually given by the Scholars of the Piggott Schools, took place on Friday, May 5th. There were large audiences, both in the afternoon and evening. At the afternoon performance, the Soldiers from the Hospital who were well enough to attend, were present. The spectacle of the united choruses, numbering about 75 children, who were massed on the platform when the curtain was raised, was a very pleasing one. The opening chorus “Welcome good people” was well received, and for two hours the young performers ably sustained their various parts: One item following another in quick succession. The recitations were very amusing and given with clear enunciation, the songs were lively and of a patriotic and martial character, while the dances were cleverly done by nine couples of the smaller children and sixteen of the elder girls, Mr. Healey very kindly officiated as accompanist.

After defraying expenses, the sum of seven guineas was sent to the Hospital for Wounded Soldiers, and a letter of thanks to the children was received from Mrs. Victor Rhodes, the Commandant.

Votes of thanks were proposed in the afternoon by the Vicar and in the evening by Mr. H. F. Nicholl, to Mr. Coleby and the Staff for the admirable work done in coaching the children. It was a delightful entertainment and must have entailed much devoted work from all concerned.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Tins and money for Serbia

The people of Wrgrave gave generously in support of our hard pressed allies in Serbia.

Servian [sic] Relief Fund

The Collections at the Parish Church on Christmas Day Amounted to £15 2s. 6d.

Miss Rhodes acted as Secretary in Wargrave to assist Mrs. Noble in her collection of tinned foods. People were invited to bring contributions to the Parish Church on Sunday, January 23rd, and a great quantity of things was given:- Many pounds of Cocoa, Coffee, Tea, and Benger’s Food; Tins of Fish, Bacon, Sausages, Beef, Soup, Beans, Biscuits, and Cakes. And £1. 16s. in cash.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Filling pillows for wounded soldiers

Women across Berkshire were busy making clothes and bandages. In Crazies Hill, Wargrave, they were stuffing pillows for the wounded.

Crazies Hill Notes

It is a matter for much congratulation that the Working Party has started again. Under the successful and able leadership of Miss Cole this Organization has done valuable work in the past: the members coming together every Wednesday afternoon with a zealous desire to do what they could for our soldiers in hospitals. The tedious work of preparing fillings for pillows was cheerfully endured and successfully accomplished; and may a wounded soldier has to thank Crazies Hill, and especially Miss Cole, for the comfortable pillow which he found awaiting him in hospital. At the beginning of Autumn Miss Cole thought it better to discontinue the work. We all know how engrossing her duties as Matron of Parkwood Auxiliary Military Hospital were becoming and that to combine the two sets of duties would be impracticable.

We all regretted it very much, and Miss Cole will always be missed on our Wednesday afternoons. However it is with feelings of deep gratitude that we record the possibility of the good work being still carried on.

Miss Rhodes has most generously consented to undertake the work. We are very grateful for her kindness in so doing and accord her a very hearty welcome. A service of Intercession precedes the Working Party, and during Advent the Vicar has most kindly promised to give an address at this service every Wednesday. This help will be greatly appreciated by the members.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

Bring a pound of anything

Even the numbers of clergy had been reduced at home with many younger men leaving their parish work for a role as an army chaplain. Women mostly had to contribute to the war effort at home. Some joined Voluntary Aid Detachments as untrained nurses. Those in Wargrave undertook to open a small hospital for the wounded.

The Clerical Staff
It has not been found possible as yet to fill the vacancy on the Staff. A great number of the younger clergy have been allowed to go as Chaplains in the Army: Their brethren count them fortunate and wish them every blessing in the great work. It is only natural, therefore, to find that there are not as many as usual for home work. The Vicar has been in correspondence with a few clergymen, but in each case the curate has had relations dependent upon him, and the stipend offered has therefore been inadequate for his needs in these expensive times.

Harvest Gifts
Many messages have been received from those on the sea and across the sea thanking the people of Wargrave for their gifts of tobacco and cigarettes. And very nice letters have been written to the Vicar by Corporal Reginald Over and Privates George Gregory, Arthur Haycock, Edward Tarry, William Bradford, Christopher Brown, Charles Critcher, William Larkin, and James Pithers, saying how pleased they were to receive the gifts and asking him to convey their thanks to the friends at home.

V.A.D. Hospital
The Wargrave Voluntary Aid Detachment Berks/58 received orders to mobilize as soon as possible and to prepare a Hospital for the reception of wounded soldiers. After carefully considering ways and means, they approached the Trustees of Woodclyffe Hostel as to the possibility of using their premises.

The Trustees met on October 14th, and on the same day communicated with the tenant of the Hostel and with the Working Men’s Club. The Trustees stated that they received the request with much sympathy so long as the rights of the tenant could be satisfied.

The Working Men’s Club Committee then met, and expressed the desire to fall in with the wishes of the Trustees if the Hostel in the furtherance of so good a cause.

In due course an amount of compensation was arranged which was acceptable to the tenant and was paid by the V.A.D.

A General Meeting of the Working Men’s Club was also held and suitable arrangements were made for the loan of their billiard table and other furniture to the V.A.D.

During the last fortnight the Members of the Detachment have been busily employed in converting the Hostel into a Hospital for 20 beds, under the direction of the Commandant, Mrs. Victor Rhodes, and the Quartermaster, Mrs. Oliver Young.

It is now near completion and it is proposed to hold a Pound Day just before it is opened, when all who are interested and who would like to inspect the Hospital before the patients arrive, will be asked to bring a pound of anything which will help to stock the larder or store room. The date will be announced later.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

Wargrave D/P145/28A/31