Beautiful glass representing St George

The Earley war memorial porch plans were altered to save money.

Memorial Porch Committee Meeting

There was a good attendance on October 16. Present: The Chairman, Mr Churchwarden Brown and Mr FB East (hon. Treasurers), Messrs. W B Waters, H B Mole, W Lawrence, A H Salman, H Masters, H Knapman, J A Murray, G C T Carter, F C Edwards, E Clayton Jones, E Long; Ladies – Mrs Newbery, Miss Goose, Miss Lawrence, Miss Driscoll, Miss G Fanstone.

The meeting was occupied with many matters of importance for an hour and a half. It was decided by a majority of votes that a resolution to line the porch with stone to be rescinded on the grounds of expense, and that the walls be plastered. It was agreed that the question of slate or stone material for the slab upon which the names be inscribed be left to the judgement of the architect; and the committee confirm their previous resolution that all parishioners should have the right to place names of their sons who died on this tablet; they felt, however, that it was not desirable that this should be done in cases where the names were associated with a memorial in another church, without special reason. The chairman produced some figures supplied by the builder which are of general interest:-

Estimated cost of Porch £559 13s 0d
Less nett cost of stone lining £20 18s 0d
£538 15s 0d

Add cost of figure in niche, also slate or stone tablet with names cut, amount uncertain, Architect’s commission of 10% on above amount

£53 17s 6d
£592 12s 6d

At the close of the meeting the treasurers made the following statement

Subscriptions paid or promised, as already announced in October Magazine

£482 0s 2d
Less unredeemed promises £2 1s 6d
£479 18s 8d

Collection at dedication festival £39 11s 0d
New subscriptions Oct 16 £11 5s 5d
£530 15s 1d

The next meeting of the committee was fixed for Nov 20 at 7.30pm

The work is now growing rapidly, and it is interesting to watch the plan of dovetailing the new work into the old wall of the present building. To do this the old north doorway had to be lowered to meet the timbered ceiling of the porch, a new arch has also been turned on the inside and the door cut down correspondingly. Thus the new doors and doorway will be considerably lower. Adjoining this doorway, about three feet eastward, will be a small door leading to the stairs to the chamber over the porch. The stairway is cut partly in the thickness of the wall and abuts in part on the floor of the porch, being concealed by brick walls. For this purpose one of two lights has been removed and there remains one single window just east of the stairs doorway. This light will be filled with beautiful glass painted by Mr Bewsey, representing S George. It is a gift from Mr B H Butler in memory of his son Benjamin James Butler whose ship was torpedoed in the Mediterranean. The glass is finished and ready for fixing. The ceiling of the porch will be built of rebated oak joists with oak panels to ceiling covered with deal floor (above) and a layer of felt between. The chamber above will thus be impervious to sound and draught. It has been decided to plaster the walls of the interior; and not as stated last month to line the porch with stone; the expense, £20 18s, seemed not justified by the advantage.


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, November 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

It is very important that the list of names of those who died should be accurate

Plans were well advanced for the memorial at St Bartholomew’s Church.

The War Memorial

The committee met on Sept 4 at 7.30pm. There was a good attendance. Present: The Chairman, Mr Churchwarden Brown and Mr FB East (hon. Treasurers), the Rev. H B Mead, Messrs. W Lawrence, A H Salman, H Masters, J A Murray, G C Sturgess, T R Stevens, E Clayton Jones, A J H Wright, E Long; Ladies – Mrs Newbery, Miss Goose, Miss Stevens, Miss Lawrence, Miss Driscoll, Miss Type.

The minutes of the last meeting were confirmed. The chairman read a letter from the architect saying that the drawings for the builder were on the point of completion. It was suggested that the names be cut into the oak panelling to avoid difficulty in adding names sent in late and to avoid expense. It was agreed that the porch be lined with stone and the two shields carved with emblems. Mrs Newbery kindly consented to include the lower part of Cumberland Road in her district. Subscriptions received to date were paid in, with one new promise. The treasurers reported at the close of the proceedings as follows:-

Subscriptions paid or promised, as already announced £455 10s 0d
New subscriptions Sept 4 £21 10s 2d
New promises £5 0s 0d

The date of the next committee meeting was fixed for Thurs Oct 16 at 7.30pm.

Since the above meeting, a letter has been received from Mr Comper suggesting that the shields should bear “the three knives ascribed to S Bartholomew on one and Reading (emblem) on the other.” He is glad that the committee consents to stone lining of the porch, and adds “You must have the names cut on a stone or slate (and not oak) slab which will form part of the stone lining of the walls recessed within a simple shallow moulding. This, I believe, will cost no more, and be durable, and part of the fabric as it ought to be. The slab need not be fixed till the walls are built…. I dare say that you will be content with the surnames and initials …. Prefixed by some inscription.

Upon this we would say that it is very important that the list of names of those who died should be accurate, and any known name, not at present posted up in the church under the flag, should be given to the Vicar without delay.

Mr F N A Garry has presented a stone beautifully carved with old Christian emblems, which Mr Comper desires to be placed 5 feet from the floor within the porch on the west wall south of the entrance. We have also to thank Mr S Newbery for making a copy of the drawing of the porch which is hung on the church door.


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Soldiers asked to give those who had been at home these last five years the benefit of their unique experience of men and things

Earley men were warmly welcomed home.

Sailors and Soldiers Entertainment

A very kind and liberal support in money and provisions removed all anxiety as to the expense of the entertainment given on Aug 30. Our only regret was the comparatively few were able to be present. The weather was cold and threatening, and though the sky held clear till half past six we were then driven to take cover in the parish hall when an enjoyable concert filled up the remained of the evening. The committee under Mr george Love’s management had provided a sumptuous tea at 4 o’clock, the hall decorated with flags, and the guests were entertained by Mrs and Miss Lawrence, Mrs Love, Mrs Weait, Mrs and Miss Porter, Mrs Edwards, Mrs Shackleford, Mrs Wilby, Mrs Long, Mrs Box, and Miss West. Games on the lawn with competitions and prizes had been arranged by Mr Love (chairman), and Messrs Sturgess, Wright, Weait, Long, Edwards, West, Porter, Lawrence, Shackleford, Clayton-Jones, Wilby and Cyphus. The evening concert was the contribution of Miss Elsie Ruffel, Messrs. O West, F L Wing, R Wing, A H Earley, HE Wilby, and CE Cyphus (Pianist).

Our guests were as follows William H Pomeroy, HMS Ophir; William B Waters, Royal Berks; G E Gibbons, R.A.S.C., M. T.; F A Charlton, R.E.; Harry F Fulbrook, 2nd Batt. Hants. 29th Div.; Vernon Truss, RAF; Albert H Barlow, 7th Queen’s R.W. Surreys; Chas. Shackleford, R.A.S.C., M. T.; H J White, RAF, E Henwood, 10th Tank Bat.; E J E Capel, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry; C W Green, RAF; O J West, HM Wireless Service; O H Long, 2nd O. Dorset Yeomanry; A W Long, R. A. S. C.; A H Earley, 219th Field Coy. R.E.; A G Earley, RAF; P G Canning, London Regt,; W H Andrews, Royal Berks and Tank Corps.; W G Ayres, R.G.A.; A J Franklin; G Gibbons; J A Earley, 1/4th R. Berks Regt.; C E Cyphus, Tank Corps.

At the close of tea the Vicar expressed the pleasure of the committee in welcoming the home-coming of their guests. He traced the steps which had led to this entertainment of them, and expressed his hope that they would gather together on more than occasion for counsel in the management of parish matters, and give those who had been at home these last five years the benefit of their unique experience of men and things.

The party dispersed soon after 9.30 after a thoroughly enjoyable time. We much regretted the unavoidable absence of Mr T R Stevens.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, October 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Cards of welcome to all sailors and soldiers who have been demobilised

Earley men were welcomed home.

Short Notes

The men’s association has been active in sending out about 100 cards of welcome to all sailors and soldiers who have been demobilised. This involved a good deal of inquiry and care. Now they are following up this by a proposal to entertain such as are able and willing to come to tea and sports on the vicarage lawn on Aug 30th or the first week of September. To do this, a committee of ladies is being appointed, also for the sports a committee of men themselves. An appeal for the provision of the tea and gifts in kind will be made later, and there is little doubt of a generous response to this. Any immediate promises of help in this way will be welcomed by the Vicar or Mr T R Stevens.

We offer a welcome home to Mr William Long after four years and three months absence in Egypt. Mr Long served in the Army Service Corps, and is now set free. His return to Reading gives us the pleasure of having him back in the choir, where with alto Mr Leslie Grinstead his presence will be much valued.


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

On the eve of Victory Day

Work was progressing slowly on the Earley St Bartholomew war memorial porch.

The War Memorial

Those who are following the progress of this fund month by month will be glad of an account of the last committee meeting on July 18. Being on the eve of Victory Day the meeting was not well attended. This was unfortunate, but the fixture had been made. There were present – The Vicar in the chair, Mr Richard Brown, hon. Treasurer (his co-treasurer being on holiday and away from home), Mr George Love, Mr FC Edwards, Mr H Mole, Mr E Clayton Jones, Mr E Long, Mr H Masters, Mrs Newbery, Miss Goose, Miss H L Stevens, Mr D Lawrence, and Miss Ashcroft.

Collectors for Cumberland Road were appointed, Mr Long and Miss Stevens volunteering for this work. Subscriptions received to date were paid in, together with some new promises. The hon. Treasurer ereported at the close of proceedings as follows

Subscriptions paid or promised, as already announced £407 8s 1d
New subscriptions July 18 £32 5s 6d
New promises £5 5s 0d
Collection in church (Peace Sunday) £10 11s 5d

This figure, with a few pounds which came in after the meeting ended represents an increase of £50 from June 13 to July 18, and one which greatly encourages us to hope for a further advance by Sept 4 (Thursday) the date of the next committee meeting. The builder has made all the preparations for the work and is waiting for the working drawings of the stonework. At the present moment church architects are pressed with work, and we must wait patiently our turn. A drawing of the porch shewing the elevation as seen looking from S Bartholomew’s Road will shortly be hung in the church, and we invite everyone to study it.


Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Gratitude for deliverance from the German menace

The War Memorial

The committee met on June 13.

Present: The vicar, the Rev. H B Mead, the two churchwardens, Messrs F B East, W B Waters, H Masters, E Long, G C Sturgess, H B Mole, E Clayton Jones, A H Salman, J A Murray, H Knapman, T R Stevens, F C Edwards, G C Love. Ladies: D A Lawrence, G Fanstone, E Type, N Driscoll, A L Martin, H L Stevens, S Goose, B Newbery. The appointment of Mr Richard Brown and Mr Frank B East as joint treasurers of the fund met with approbation. The newly elected treasurers proceeded to receive the first payments, and a first and most gratifying instalment, in cash and promises, the amount of £407 8s 1d was returned. It was resolved to ask the builder to proceed with the work with as little delay as possible. The committee adjourned to Friday 18 July.

This glorious start, recorded above, may rightly call for a word in these pages. There are hundreds of people round about the church who may like to have a share in this Memorial; and the generosity of the first givers will, we hope, move them to follow their example. As we may have said before, we do not want to beg anyone to give to our memorial porch; we only desire to ask them to decide whether or not they will show their gratitude for deliverance from the German menace in this way. Those who have given, and those who mean to give, know that a considerable sum must be yet obtained if the architect’s fee and builders expenses are to be met. We have a large and determined committee, and they may be relied upon to bring the matter under the notice of the parishioners and worshippers of the church. Outside these there are but a few that can be approached; the amount must be raised amongst ourselves, and we are confident that it will be raised.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

A united Act of thanksgiving for the deliverance from the grave peril which threatened the lives and liberties of Englishmen

The war memorial porch at St Bartholomew’s would be quite expensive.

The [war memorial] committee met on March 19 and in spite of the snow and cold all were present except Rev. H B Mead, Mr R Brown, Mr Walters, Mr Love, Mr Long, Miss Type, and Miss Goose. Mr Box was elected onto the committee. Much useful work was done and the following leaflet for distribution was approved:-

S Bartholomew’s Parish War Memorial

It was resolved at a general meeting of parishioners on March 13, of which public notice was given, to make a united Act of thanksgiving for the deliverance from the grave peril which threatened the lives and liberties of Englishmen, and issued in the Great War. The meeting decided to build a beautiful and commodious North Porch on the London Road side of S Bartholomew’s church, and to inscribe on its walls the names of all the men connected with this parish who had laid down their lives in the War.

It was further determined to invite contributions from all persons living in the parish or worshipping at the church, who are disposed to take part in this common Act of Thanksgiving, as a lasting memorial of their sacrifice.

£500 is asked for.

Donations should be entered in the book of an accredited collector. A balance sheet of all the receipts and expenditure will be issued by the committee.

Signed E J Norris Chairman of Committee

The next meeting of the committee was fixed for April 9 at 7pm in the parish hall.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P192/28A/15)

Reading School’s contribution to the war

A complete listing of Reading School’s alumni who had served in the war.

OLD BOYS SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES.

This list has been compiled from information received up to December 14th, 1918; corrections and additions will be welcomed and should be addressed to: – R. Newport, Esq., Reading School, Reading.

Allnatt, Rifleman N.R. — London Rifle Brigade.
(killed in Action).
Ambrose, 2nd Lieut. L.C. — S.L.I.
Anderson, Pte. L.G. — Can. Exp. Force
Appelbee, 2nd Lieut. T. — 13TH West Yorks.
(Killed in Action).
Atkinson, Lieut. E.G. — Indian Army
Atkinson, Capt. G.P. — 6TH Royal North Lancs.
Atkinson, 2nd Lieut. J.C. — R.A.F.
Aust, 2nd Lieut. H.E. — Yorkshire Regt.
(Twice Wounded).
(Killed in Action).
Aveline, Lieut. A.P. — Royal Berks Regt,
(Wounded).
(Military Cross).
Baker, 2nd Lieut. A.C.S. — R.G.A.
Baker, Rifleman A.E. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Rifleman R.S. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Lieut. T.H. — 8TH Royal Berks Regt.
(Wounded)
Balding, Capt. C.D. — Indian Army.
Banks, Pte. W.R. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Bardsley, Capt. R.C — Manchester Regt.
(Wounded).
Barnard, F.P. —
Barroby, Trooper. F. — Strathcona Horse.
Barry, Capt. L.E. — R.A.F.
Baseden, Lieut. E. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Baseden, 2nd Lieut. M.W. — R.A.F.
Batchelor, Lieut. A.S. — Duke of Cornwall’s L.I.
Bateman, Capt. W.V. — Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Bayley, 2nd Lieut. F. — Chinese Labour Battalion.
Beckingsale, Pte. R.S. — Canadian Contingent.
Beckingsale, Capt. R.T. — Tank Corps (Military Cross).
(Wounded).

Belsten, E.K. — R.A.F.
Biddulph, 2nd Lieut. R.H.H. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Died of Wounds).
Bidmead, Pte. — Wilts regt.
Black, Pte. F. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Blazey, A.E.H. — R.A.F.
Blazey, 2nd Lieut. J.W. — Royal Berks Regt
(killed in Action).
Bleck, Lieut. W.E. — R.F.A.
Bliss, 2nd Lieut. A.J. — Leinster Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Bliss, Pte. W. — 2ND Batt.Hon.Art.Coy. (more…)

A day of grief and glory: another of our boys has heard the call of God and joined the throngs invading heaven “with gay and careless faces”

Memories are shared of a Reading-born man whose death had been reported.

Harry Ireland Long

It was with deep regret that we heard of the death of Lance-Corpl. Harry Long, who was killed in action in Flanders on August 15th. To most of us his name is familiar, as being the son of our old and esteemed friends, Mr. and Mrs. William Long, and to them, as to his sister and brothers, we offer our deep sympathy. Some, however, had a more intimate knowledge, and one of those, the Rev. Herbert Snell, of Caterham, a former minister of Trinity, has kindly written the following:-

“Lest Heaven be thronged with greybeards hoary,
God, who made boys for his delight,
Stoops, in a day of grief and glory,
And calls them in, in from the night.
When they come trooping from the War,
Our skies have many a new gold star.”

Another of our boys has heard the call of God and joined the throngs invading heaven “with gay and careless faces.” Another has cheerfully and bravely given his life to make earth clean again, and keep it safe for those who regard honour among the highest and love peace.

It is easy enough to write these words, but behind them are living hearts that ache with grief and yet rejoice with noble pride.

Harry Ireland Long was the eldest son of William and Anna Long. He was born February 25th 1886, at Reading, and was killed in Flanders on August 15th, 1917.

“Trinity” will remember him, first of all, as a youngster, attending school at Miss Lacy’s and at Miss Burgisi’s, and on Sundays as a member of Mr. H.A. Baynes’ Bible-class. When I knew him he was at Reading School, which he left in 1901 in order to work for a while in his father’s business. Everyone liked his handsome face, with bold dark eyes and pleasant smile; though there was plenty of the boy about him there was a serious vein in Harry’s thinking which soon brought him to face the great deep questions of life. A year had scarcely elapsed from the time of leaving school before he joined the membership of Trinity Church.

In 1904, Harry went to Kingston in Jamaica where he worked for eight years. During that time he went through the terrible experiences of the great earthquake of January, 1907. Although he escaped the physical perils of that time, I have some kind of an idea that it was then he met his “fate,” and that there was some connection between the incidents of January, 1907, and a marriage which took place in Kingston, 1910, between Harry on the one side, and Miss Isabel Frances, of Crouch end, London on the other. But I do not give this as authoritative, lest, perchance, a very treacherous memory should have betrayed me.

Only this I know, and can speak thereon with utter confidence, having been privileged to visit on several occasions their delightful little home in Montreal, that it was a marriage full of happiness and promise.

It was in 1912 that they migrated to Montreal and in 1914 that I found them there, with Maurice who had joined them about a year before. I was at that time taking charge of Emmanuel Church during Dr. Hugh Pedley’s vacation, and being altogether a stranded and solitary stranger in the huge city, it was an indescribable pleasure to receive an English welcome in a Canadian home. None of us thought, in those early uninstructed days of the war, that it would ever be necessary for one of us to join up, and it was utterly beyond the limits of considered possibilities that one of our laughing circle should, in three years from then, have given his life for freedom.

Harry enlisted in the 244th Canadian Battalion Kitchener’s Own on September 1st, 1916. Owing to his previous training in the Victoria Rifles (Montreal’s volunteer contingent), he was almost at once given Sergeant’s rank, and when he came to England in April, 1917, it was a company Quarter-master Sergeant. Six weeks later he went to the Front with a draft to reinforce a Canadian battalion already there, and so lost his stripes, but he was speedily promoted again to Lance-Corporal, and it was while “gallantly leading his section in an attack against a strong German position,” that he met his death. The Chaplain of his Battalion, Capt. C. Stuart, speaks of him as having speedily won a place for himself in affection and esteem of all the boys. “He was so keen and willing in his work, so cheerful always in the face of all discomforts and difficulties that he became one of the most popular men in his platoon.”

And so another of our boys is gone. And the world is becoming more cheerless as we think we shall have to go on to the end without them.

But this also we know, and it far outweighs the gloom, they have brightened the earth by their example, they have for ever enriched life by their self-sacrifice.

Harry Ireland Long will not be forgotten at Trinity, and his name will go down with honour among those who have helped to save the world for Christ.

“Oh, if the sonless mothers weeping
And the widowed girls could see inside,
The glory that hath them in keeping
Who went to the Great War and died,
They would rise and put their mourning off,
And say ‘Thank God, he has enough.”

Trinity Congregational Magazine, October 1917 (D/EX1237/1)

The influence which temperance groups must exercise in preparing for after-the-war home life

Anti-alcohol campaigners wanted the wartime restrictions on pubs to act as a springboard for a new sober public life after the war.

The Church of England Temperance Society

On Thursday, June 21st, 1917, the Open-Air Meeting of the CETS was held on the Vicarage Lawn, the Vicar in the Chair. There was a fairly good attendance, about 150 adults and 70 children. The Maidenhead Band was present.

The Chairman presented the speaker, the Rev. B Long, Rector of Wokingham, whose speech was full of interest. Points to be remembered were: The importance of Temperance work in view of Government action, and possible changes in the management and sale of alcoholic drinks; the influence which CETS branches must exercise in preparing for after-the-war home life…

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, August 1917 (D/P181/28A/26)

Men from Reading St Mary

More Reading men were serving.

Roll of Honour
Additional names, S. Mary’s District

Frederick Day, Leonard Day, Frederick George Taylor, Frederick Eggleton, George Critcher, Thomas Critcher, Albert Humphries, William Barnes, Robert Hester, Albert Jennings, Charles Gould, Keith Long, Ernest Dunk, William George Bennett, George Brooks, William Russell Hall (wounded), Arthur Brill, Walter Long, Walter Taylor, Reuben Potter, Hubert Hunt, Peter Barmby (wounded), William Green (rejoined after discharge).

R.I.P.
Harry Brown.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, August 1916 (D/P98/28A/13)

“I don’t think we grudge these sons of ours if their death removes once and for all the horrors of war for future generations”

The vicar of Reading St Giles reported on the news of many young men from the town serving at the Front. Several had fallen in action.

Notes from the Vicar

To be added to the intercessions list:
Charles Barber (H.M.S. Ajax); lieut. James McNie Campbell, 12th Royal Scots; Lce. Corpl. E. Jardine, 5th R. Berks Rgt.; Trooper P.O. Jardine, Berkshire Yeomanry; Lieut. S.H. Jardine, 17TH R, Fusiliers; Private L.F.Jardine, 12th R Warwickshire Rgt; Ernest William Wheeler, R.F.C.; Fredk. H. Goddard, Queens Own Dorset Yeomanry; Leslie Victor Peirce, 3rd R. Berks; A. Williams, R. Fusiliers; Private Charles A. Bartlett, 1st Garrison Worcester Regt.; Private Henry Adams,1st Buffs; Lydall Savill, Eric Savill, Alfred Savill, Cyril May.

Sick and Wounded:
Corpl. Arthur Smith, C.G. Gutch, Private Albert Bendall, Private William Long, Private Leonard Smith, J. W. Redston, Private Ernest James Wise, Sergt. Clemetston, Private R. Crawford, Lieut. B. Lloyd, Drummer W.G. Stevens, Private C. Greaves, Private Thatcher, Departed: Lieut. T.G. Haughton, Capt. Bruce Smith-Masters, Driver R. Lund, R.F.A. Lieut. G.E. Maggs, Sergt. J. Eaton, Private Stanley Durman, Private Victor Burgess, Private Albert Bowley, Private T.J. Tollman, C.V. Tollman, R.N. Lieut. S. Sneider, Private G.H. Wellings.

We are sorry to hear that Sergt. R. Golding is among the “missing.”

Our sympathy goes out to the relatives and friends of these brave men who have so nobly done their duty. I should like to quote one sentence I received from a mother. “I don’t think we grudge these sons of ours if their death removes once and for all the horrors of war for future generations, as we trust it will; the only thing to do is to look steadily at the happiness of those who have passed.” They will always be remembered at S. Giles as their names are on the Roll of Honour.

I think a good many of you would like to read the letter sent by one of Captain Bruce Smith-Masters’ brother officers.

“Capt. Smith-Masters, who was my company Commander on active service for 15 months, was a magnificent type of the British Officer, as we know them. He was looked up to and admired by his Officers, and worshipped by his N.C.O’s and men. It was a tremendous shock to us to hear that he had been killed, as he went into the battle as cheerily as could be, and I certainly expected him to survive. He had been our constant companion for a long period of the campaign, and I think I am right in saying that he was the making of his company. Keen on sports by nature, and an athlete himself, he trained his men excellently, and was the means of their keeping fit. He always had an eye on their personal comfort, and anything that could be done for them, he did. In short, he was an awfully good fellow, and I am terribly sorry to think that he has gone. A finer company commander I never had, a keener officer never breathed.”

S. MICHAEL’S DISTRICT

To the list of the fallen in the war I have with great regret to add the names of Victor Burgess and Ernest Goddard. The deepest sympathy of us all goes out to the relations of these men and others on our list who have given their lives for their country.

Harold Baker is reported as missing in the recent fighting in Franc, but up to the moment of writing this has not been officially posted. We shall, I hope remember in our prayers his relations and friends, and others who are in anxiety and suspense because of the absence of definite news of their missing relations.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, August 1916 (D/P191/28A/24)

‘My eye, they do seem bitter about Gallipoli’

Lady Mary Glyn and her daughter Meg Meade both wrote to Meg’s brother Ralph. Lady Mary was staying with her other daughter Maysie Wynne-Finch in Windsor, while Meg was in Portsmouth caring for a sick friend’s children, and mixing with senior naval figures.

Elgin Lodge
Windsor
April 19 1916

The Cabinet Crisis is a real one & may bring about great events, but Asquith … seems to be able to keep together the Coalition at all hazards.

Trebizond is the good news of today’s paper. Well, the French are teaching is what it is to “hold”, and it is my belief we are to hold for the Kingdom that will surely come and we are all to think of the Christ as St John saw him… and He will make no mistake and order no sacrifice that is unavailing – the only leaders now are those who are “joyful as those that march to music, sober as those that must company with Christ” and we see them at all the fronts, but not yet among those who have made of statecraft a craft for self and for selfish ends. It is lamentable how few there are who are trusted & who can “hold” now for the Kingdom of that Lord & His Christ you soldiers know and obey. And yet I cannot believe that a country is ready to win the war so long as there is no real love and faith in God or man as a nation through its representatives. And our power will crumble if we give way to a carping spirit of criticism, and sometimes in perfect despair I find myself trying to believe in AJB and Walter Long, Bonar Law & those in whom the “Party” have consented before the Coalition. But as you know I have never had much belief in AJB’s power to impart a conviction which is founded on the rubble of the failure to find an absolute conviction….

Your own Mur
(more…)

A supreme death and an imperishable name

The Earley parish magazine reports on the parishioners who had answered the call of their country – and one tragic death.

We regret to learn from a letter dated Oct 5th that Mr F C Goodson who recently joined the 19th Labour Company ASC has met with a serious accident. It appears from his own written account that he was engaged with some Frenchmen and others from his own company in unloading bar iron by means of a steam crane. An unexpected movement of the crane found the men unprepared, and the swing of the bars of metal caught Mr Goodson on the arm and threw him violently against the ship, thereby severly injuring his head. We need hardly say how sorry we are to have this news, and express very real sympathy with him in his suffering.

We were glad to see Mr Thomas Fullbrook home on a few days leave. Lance-Corporal in the Marines, he is one of many who keep watch on the seas in the Grand Fleet. Mr Fullbrook has earned his gun-laying badge, a distinction which may be appreciated by those who reflect what it means to secure eight hits out of ten shots at a floating target of about 900 feet long by 300 feet high at a distance of 18 miles! Mr Fullbrook has been in the Service for some years.

Another of our servers, Mr George Turnbull, has joined the Army Ordnance Corps. Mr Turnbull’s duties at the Guardians’ Office were of so pressing a kind that it was difficult for him to be released. He was formerly an officer in our old CLB [Church Lads Brigade] corps.

Mr Arthur Leslie Edwards – the last remaining tenor in our choir – has joined His Majesty’s Navy, following the example of his two brothers. We shall miss his help, but he is right to go, and carries with him all the good wishes of St Bartholomew’s.

We regret to learn that three soldiers on our special list have been wounded in recent engagements, Sergt. Charles James Bird, Corpl. Samuel Iles, and Pte. Joshua Digweed. Trooper Herbert Long is progressing well at home and is able to report to his regiment.

In Memoriam

It is not easy to put into words the thoughts that come into mind when we have to record the death of Clifford Salman. (more…)

Three days without food in a forgotten trench

More Earley men (and a woman) joined up in the war’s second autumn. Others had suffered the vicissitudes of war.

Yet another of our choirmen, Mr F C Goodson, has gone forth to the war and carries with him our good wishes. Mr Goodson has joined the Army Service Corps (19th Labour Company) and will be employed in France, probably at one of the landing stages. On Sept 7th we heard of his safe arrival on the French coast, and the Vicar heard from him on the 20th.

Mr Stanley Hayward, who for many years has served both in the choir and as principal server, has also gone. Mr Hayward offered his services as clerk to the Army Ordnance Corps, and left home to report himself to Woolwich on Sept. 8th. He, too, carries with him our best wishes.

Mr William Stevens, of 119 Grange Ave, private 2nd Battalion of the Royal Warwicks (which played a gallant part in the first battle of Ypres in Oct, and later on took part in the battle of Neuve Chapelle) has been home and amongst us. Pte Stevens was wounded in the back and buried by a bursting shell in the trenches, and was subsequently dug out. Among his other experiences, he was left with 11 others in an advanced trench for three days without food, as the order to retire failed to reach them. On this occasion he was officially reported “missing”. He has now recovered his health, and sailed on Sept. 2nd to rejoin his regiment. His two brothers are serving, one in the Persian Gulf; the other is in the Royal Navy and shortly expected home on sick leave.

We regret to learn that Mr Herbert E Long, of 40 St Bartholomew’s Road, trooper in the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry, has been wounded at the Dardanelles. Fortunately the wounds appear to have been slight. Like Mr W Stevens, he too has two brothers serving in the Army, one with the Army Service Corps in Egypt and one presently in England.

Miss Hilda Sturgess, one of our Sunday School teachers, sailed on Sept 10th for Egypt in company with about 100 nurses. Miss Sturgess reluctantly gave up her class at the beginning of the War and joined the nursing staff at St Luke’s Red Cross Hospital for the wounded. After many months work there the War Office requested her to undertake work in one of the hospitals, presumably Cairo or Alexandria, and she accepted the call. It is a courageous action to go out with strangers into a strange country without hope of return for at least six months. It seems to us a true and honourable service to one’s country and deserving of every commendation.

Mr Reginald Sturgess, another of our old choir leaders, has left England for the Dardanelles. He joined the West Kent Yeomanry about a year ago. They have been quartered near Canterbury these many months wondering whether they would be sent abroad or not. Orders came last month, and they are now either in Egypt or, more probably, at the front in Gallipoli. Mr Reginald Sturgess has won considerable distinction in machine gunnery, and will without doubt prove himself an efficient and capable soldier.

The Rev. J W Blencowe, whose lectures on the Melanesian Mission have been greatly appreciated here, has resigned his curacy at Wokingham and been appointed Chaplain to HM Forces in the Dardanelles. By a curious coincidence Mr Blencowe will go out with the West Kent Yeomanry to which Mr Reginald Sturgess belongs. At the time of writing we have no other information than that Mr Blencowe was ordered to be ready on Monday the 20th ult. If he sails with the West Kents, the chaplain and one of the troopers will begin their friendship with a good deal in common.

Earley parish magazine, October 1915 (D/P192/28A/13)