Balance sheets are delightful things now-a-days

Newbury’s clergymen were rejected for war work, while the parish magazine was at risk.

THE WAR

There are reported Missing – Alfred Dennis, William Smith, Mr Barlow, and Mr Marshall; Wounded – Ernest Giggs; Gassed – Jack Smart; Prisoners – Jack Cooke and William Selwyn. We offer our sympathy to the relatives and friends.

The clergy of the diocese have received a Form from the Bishop on which they could offer for War Service. The Rector stated on his Form that he would be prepared to go to a Church Army Hut for several months if the work of the Parish could be provided for; and he has received the following reply through the Bishop’s Secretary: “The Bishop says stay where you are”.

Mr Marle offered to go to a YMCA Hut for four months, but received the reply: “The Bishop certainly thinks that you should stay where you are”.

As with our food, our clothes, and our boots, so with our paper. We are continually being faced with a new situation. After urging our readers to continue to take in the Parish Magazine, we have received a communication from the publishers of the Dawn of Day [insert] that there is serious shortage of paper, or that there will be, asking us to cut down our number of copies. However, it appears that our circulation has been so far reduced that we shall not have to ask any of our subscribers not to subscribe; but whether we shall be able to make both ends meet at the end of the year is doubtful. Balance sheets are delightful things now-a-days.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, June 1918(D/P89/28A/13)

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Names for remembrance at the altar

Several more men from Reading had joined up.

Roll of Honour

The following additional names have been sent in for remembrance at the Altar.

Leonard Barlow, William Thomas Brind, Frederick Charles Brind, Arthur Ernest Brind, James William Dredge, John Hillier, James Tennant Ireland, Frederick Charles Sales, Cecil Sales, Percy Sales.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, July 1916 (D/P98/28A/13)

Remember the brave and true, and give them rest

Bracknell mourned the loss of several of its soldiers, and the serious injury of others.

THE WAR
THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

The following prayer from a Russian Liturgy will be valued by many at this time.

“Remember all those, the brave and true, who have died at the death of honour and are departed in the hope of resurrection to eternal Life. In that place of light, whence sorrow and mourning are far banished, give them rest O Lord, the Lover of man. Grant this O Lord.”

* * *
Lieut. William A. P. Foster, the elder son of Sir William and Lady Foster, has died of wounds received in action at Frankfurt in Germany. He was in the South Staffordshire Regiment and came back from South Africa in September and went out on the 4th of October to join the Army on Active Service. After three or four weeks of strenuous service he was wounded on October 31st and fell into the hands of the enemy, and now the sad news has come that he died of his wounds in November 11th. Since he joined the Army he has served mostly abroad, but we have seen him from time to time when he has been home at Priestwood House, and he was greatly loved, not only by his fellow soldiers, but by all who knew him.

Another of our Bracknell men has fallen, Frederick Butler. He rejoined the Army at the beginning of the war; he had served in the South African war and had two medals. The news of his death reached Bracknell on November 16th but he was killed on October 21st.

We also deeply regret the loss of Sub-Lieut. Charles Van Neck, the youngest son of Mrs. Van Neck, late of Lily Hill. He was a most promising young officer and fell on October 24th. Mrs Van Neck’s eldest son is also amongst the “missing.”

Amongst the wounded form this Parish are Lieut. Warren Mackenzie, who we are glad to say is reported to be doing well; he is at present in hospital in France. George Clarke, who is in the Reading hospital. Harry Hollingsworth, who some weeks ago was reported to be wounded, but of whom no further news has yet come through. H. Downham, who has been in hospital in Newcastle. Henry Barlow, who is at Chatham. Harry Matthews, who is in France, and according to his own account, “going on grand.” Another young soldier, Harry Loader, whose family lived until lately here, is also reported to be wounded; he is in the hospital at Dewsbury.

Mrs. Alfred Isaacs, whose husband was reported to be missing weeks ago, has now received a letter from him telling her that he has been wounded and captured; he has now recovered from his wounds and is a prisoner in Germany.

Lieut. Norman Johnston who was slightly wounded has come home. William Notley is also at home minus a finger, and Arthur Richardson is wounded and in France.

FOREIGN MISSIONS.
There is to be a Sale of Work (consisting of useful articles for Sailors, Soldiers, Refugees and Children) at the Parish Room at the Vicarage on Tuesday, December 6th, from 2.30 to 6 p.m., the proceeds of which will be given to Missions.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/12)

A right minded boy does his duty and dies gloriously

Bracknell had lost its first man to the war – a young career soldier remembered locally for his football skills, with many others joining up.

The following is a list of those who belong to the Parish of Bracknell, and who are in the habit of attending Bracknell Church, who are now serving in H.M. Forces.

NAVY.
R.-Admiral Dudley de Chair, Cecil Bowler, E. Cordery, G. Freeman, G. Jenkins, A. Mott, C. Pleass, H. Roe, R. Watson, E. Wild.

MARINES
E. J. Brailey, R. H. Hester, E. S. Simmonds, C. H. Johnson, W. G. Johnson, J. H. Johnson, F. Gray, Charles Gambriel, G. Jenkins, S. Plummer, A. Prouten.

Many of these are in the North Sea.

ARMY
On Active Service.
Lieut. W. Foster, Lieut. W. Mackenzie, Captain W. K. George, H. Baker, Henry Barlow, Reginald Bowler, George Bowles, John Brant, G. H. Butcher, F. Butler, Alfred Case, Daniel Chaplin, L. Claridge, G. Clarke, N. Clarke, H. Currey, H. Downham, F. Dolby, M. Fox, W. Grimes, F. Harvey, H. Hollingsworth, A. Isaacs, B. Linnegar, A. Mason, H. Matthews, G. Morton, A. Newton, H. Norman, F. Offield, F. Rathband, R. Sadler, B. Sone, A. Winfield, C. Young, A. Penwell (India), S. Norman (Malta), W. Notley, A. E. Reed.

In England
Col. Sir W. Foster, Bart., Lieut. J. C. L. Barnett, Lieut. B. Foster, H. Alder, James Bowyer, John Bowyer, G. Brant, H. Bristow, C. Burt, C. Cave, C. Church, W. Clark, F. L. Dean, C. Dyer, W. Dyer, C. W. Ellis, F. Fitzhugh, J. K. George, E. Godfrey, F. Goddard, H. Gray, J. Gray, Ernest Gambriel, H. Gregory, S. Grimes, A. Holloway, H. Hoptroff, C. Hoptroff, G. Hoptroff, T. H. James, A. Jenkins, G. Kent, S. Kidley, R. Larcombe, J. Lawrence, L. Linnegar, E. Mason, G. Mason, H. Marshall, W. Norris, E. Noyes, H. Perrin, A. Pither, J. Pither, W. Pither, A. J. Prouten, S. Rixon, A. Readings, W. Sargeant, R. Sargeant, D. Sargeant, A. E. Searle, S. Sone, W. Spencer, H. Thompson, P. Treble, W. Turner, B. Turner, H. Webb, F. Webb, A. Winter, G. Winter, H. Winter, J. Wooff, R. Wright, A. Youens, E. Willman.

Two young men belonging to Bracknell have come over with the Canadian Contingent and will shortly be at the Front, – William Searle, and C. Berry.

Drummer Eric W. Roe of the Grenadier Guards is the first of our Bracknell men whose name is placed on the “Roll of Honour.” (more…)