The terms of peace

A Berkshire vicar guided his flock in thoughts about how the post-war world should look.

Crazies Hill Notes

On the Sunday Evenings during Lent a course of sermons will be preached by the Vicar, Subject:- The Terms of Peace.

i. Between the Kingdoms of the World
ii. Between Capital and Labour
iii. Between Members of a Family
iv. Between God and Man
v. Between a man and his own heart

May this coming season of Lent be a time of rich blessing to us all, drawing us closer to our Lord in prayer and self-denial, so that the Easter Festival may find us prepared to rejoice in His glorious Resurrection.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Advertisements

“We hope shortly to turn our attention to the needs of French and Belgian Refugees”

One sewing group continued to help refugees even after the war was over.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Women’s Working Party maintains a good attendance on Wednesdays at 2.30. A final consignment of Hospital work has been received from Lady Munro’s Committee, and we hope shortly to turn our attention to the needs of French and Belgian Refugees.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

“Right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style”

This supplement to the roll of honour’s bald list of names gives us more detail about the parish’s fallen heroes.

Supplement to the Wargrave Parish Magazine

ROLL OF HONOUR.
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of thy compassion: We remember before thee our brethren who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness of all our sins, and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself to us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

Baker, Edward
Private, 7th Wiltshire Regiment, killed in action on the Salonica Front, April 24th, 1917, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker. He was born at Wargrave and educated at the Piggott School. When the war commenced he was working as a grocer’s assistant in Wargrave. He volunteered in 1915 and was sent out in 1916. He was killed by a shell in a night charge.

Barker, Percy William

Private, 7th Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment/ Killed at Salonica, July 4th 1917, aged 19. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. William Barker at Yeldall Lodge. His father was for twenty years a gardener at Yeldall. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the village school. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. He was one of the most helpful lads on the Boys’ Committee of the Boys’ Club. He volunteered May 11th, 1916. On July 4th, 1917, he was hit by a piece of shell from enemy aircraft while bathing and died within an hour. The Chaplain wrote to his parents “Your loss is shared by the whole battalion”.

Bennett, William
Sergeant, 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in France, Dec 3rd, 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bennett, of Wargrave, and when the war broke out he was working on a farm. He volunteered at once. He was killed instantly by a shell. One of his officers wrote: “Sergt. Bennett was the best N.C.O. we had in the company. Fearless, hardworking, willing, he was a constant inspiration to his platoon. His splendid record must inevitably have led to his decoration. We have lost an invaluable N.C.O. and a fine man. He was buried with all possible reverence about half a mile from Eaucourt L’Abbaye”.

Boyton, Bertram
Lieut., 6th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds in Palestine, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 36. He was educated at King’s College, London, and was a Surveyor and Architect by profession. He was a Fellow of the Surveyors Institute and had won Gold and Silver Medals of the Society of Auctioneers by examination. He was married to Elsie, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Morris, at the Parish Church, Wargrave, Sept. 7th 1905, He was a member of the London Rowing Club and the Henley Sailing Club, and keenly interested in all athletics. He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company in April 1915. He was given a commission in the 6th London R.F.A., in July 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant soon after. He went to France with his battery in June 1916, and to Salonica in the following November. He was sent to Egypt and Palestine in June 1917, and was wounded while taking his battery into action in an advance on November 6th. He died at El Arish on November 9th, 1917.

Buckett, Ernest Frederick

Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action Sept. 20th, 1917, in France, aged 23. The dearly loved husband of Dorothy May Buckett, married May 31st, 1917. He was educated at the Henley National School, and before the War was a slaughterman with Messrs. O’Hara & Lee, butchers, Henley and Wargrave. In 1910 he joined the Berkshire Yeomanry (Territorial Force), and was called up on August 4th, 1914, at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in the spring of 1915. When he had completed his five years service, since the date of his enlistment, he volunteered for another year, but received his discharge as a time-expired man in January 1916. In July, 1916, he was called up under the new regulations and sent immediately to France where he remained, except for leave on the occasion of his marriage, until he fell in action, September 20th, 1917. (more…)

A very brave young soldier

Three young Wargrave men, all of whom had joined up as teeneagers, were reported killed.

Roll of Honour
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of they compassion: We remember before thee our brethen who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy of a place among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness for all our sins and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself for us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

The following names must be added to the Roll of those who have laid down their lives for their Country in the great war:-

Haycock, Burton. Private 1st Somerset Light Infantry, killed in action at Broadrunde Ridge, October 4th, 1917, aged 19. The eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Haycock of Cockpole Green, Crazies Hill. Reported missing November,1917. In August, 1918, a report was received that he was killed on October 4th, 1917. He joined up in February, 1917 and after 7 months training was sent to France, shortly after his 19th birthday. He had been in France only five weeks when he was killed. His Captain wrote “Your son was a very brave young soldier.”

Herbert, Charles. Rifleman 2/9 County of London Queen Victoria Rifles, killed in action September 26th, 1917, aged 21. He was reported missing until September 29th, 1918, when the news of his death was officially confirmed. He was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Herbert of Wargrave. He was educated at the Piggott School. At the outbreak of war he was a footman in service in London, where he found a very kind home and was much appreciated. He volunteered on May 28th, 1915, and was sent to France in February, 1917.

Williams, Jack. Private 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed in action September 27th, 1918 aged 18. He was educated at the Piggott School and was called up in November, 1917. He was sent to France in June, 1918. He was killed instantly. His Captain wrote:- “His death was a great loss as he was a fine soldier”.

Wargrave parish magazine, November 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

This splendid cause

Crazies Hill people continued to do what they could to help wounded and disabled soldiers.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Women’s War Working Party has again resumed its activities, under the direction of Miss Rhodes, and a band of loyal workers meets every Wednesday afternoon, to help forward this splendid cause.

A most successful Whist Drive was held on Wednesday, Nov 20th, the proceeds being devoted to the aid of S. Dunstan’s Hostel for blinded soldiers and sailors.

The amount raised, £16, 10s, 0d. was due in large measure to the energetic labours of Mr. H. Woodward, who secured donations to the amount of £5, 18s, 9d. The Sale of tickets and cash taken at the door amounted to £5, 8s, 9d. and a prize draw realized £5, 2s, 6d. The prizes were kindly given by several friends, so that expenses were nil.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Fireworks and thanksgiving to God for the victory of the Allied Cause

Crazies Hill Notes

Thanksgiving services were held on the day of the signing of the Armistice, and on the following Sunday, when a large congregation gathered in the Mission Hall to offer praise and thanksgiving to God for the victory of the Allied Cause.

On Saturday, Nov 16th, the scholars of Crazies Hill School assembled in the Hall for Tea by the kindness of Mr. Bond, who generously provided the refreshments. Afterwards Mr. Chenery showed us a varied selection of interesting and amusing lantern slides, which were greatly appreciated by all.

We desire to record our grateful thanks to all who kindly helped to provide a most enjoyable evening for the children.

Many availed themselves of the opportunity offered by Sir William Cain to witness an excellent firework display at the Manor.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

“After four years of war we ought to do what we could to make up to the little people for the many ordinary pleasures of childhood which they had necessarily missed”

The Armistice was greeted with joy and celebration in Wargrave.

Victory

The news that the Armistice was signed reached the Wargrave Post Office at almost 11.20 a.m. on Monday November 11th. The Foreman of the Belfry was ready to summon his Ringers and in a very few minutes the bells of the Parish Church rang joyously. The houses were soon bedecked with flags, the village street became full of people and the wounded soldiers marched in procession with noise and merriment. At noon there was a short service for the few who could assemble, but at 7 p.m. there was a general Service of Thanksgiving to Almighty God and the Parish Church was crowded.

The Authorities have permission for the arrangement of public festivities with bonfires and fireworks to be held within one week only of Armistice day. It seemed right to do all that could be done to impress the event upon the memories of the children, and it was felt that after four years of war we ought to do what we could to make up to the little people for the many ordinary pleasures of childhood which they had necessarily missed. But there was no time to call a public meeting to discuss the matter because the only chance of securing provisions was to make the purchases at once. By the hospitality and spirit of Sir William Cain and Mr. Bond the general entertainment of the whole village was happily arranged.

Mr. and Mrs. Bond entertained all the young people under the ages of 18 to tea. The infants met in their own school and were afterwards taken to join the older children in the Piggott School for a magic lantern entertainment. The Boys’ Club, the Girls’ Club, and the other young people had their tea in the District School. The Crazies Hill Children were well provided for in the Mission Hall and Mr. Chenery showed them a good exhibition of lantern slides.

There were many kind helpers and a good many visitors to the tea parties. At each place of entertainment there were a few words spoken to help impress the memories of the young people with the greatness of the occasion and our cause for thankfulness. Mr. Bond, Mr. Huggins, and the Vicar all said something at one place or another, and everywhere there were loud cheers for the host and hostess. It was delightful to see the enjoyment of the children.

The Fireworks were announced to commence at 8 p.m., at the Manor, and the entertainment was for all parishioners. It was a most magnificent display with many set pieces, a host of rockets and a bonfire at the last. The show was arranged at the top of the park just below the garden terrace. A great crowd of people thronged the lawns and overflowed to the grass beyond.

At the conclusion of the fireworks, when the people were gathered to the bonfire, the Vicar, supported by Mr. Bond, expressed the thanks of the parish to Sir William and Lady Cain. Everyone understood that when both time and supply were so limited there could have been no entertainment at all unless someone had acted at once. Sir William Cain has always shown that he has the welfare of Wargrave in mind and on this occasion he acted immediately, taking the whole burden upon himself and supplying an entertainment which no combined effort could have surpassed. The cheers of the guests must have done something to show how much the hospitality was appreciated, and it would indeed be difficult to think of anything that could have been devised that would have been more calculated to impress the memories of the young people with the glorious event of this happy victory than the entertainment which they enjoyed at Wargrave.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

The interest and attraction of the work

A Wargrave curate who had volunteered as an army chaplain was enjoying his new life.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Rev. W.G. Smylie is now working in a Church Army Hut for the benefit of the soldiers in the Inkerman Barracks, Woking, Surrey. He writes very happily about the interest and attraction of the work. He may soon go to France.

Mr Smylie is much missed by his friends at Crazies Hill and the best wishes of all will follow him in his new work.

Wargrave parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Taking up work with the Church Army

A Berkshire curate left to work with the Church Army behind the lines.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Rev. W. G. Smylie who has been the Vicar’s loyal colleague for three and a half years is leaving on September 2nd. He proposes after a short rest, to take up work with the Church Army. The good wishes of all will accompany him in his new duties.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Supported and comforted by our prayers in the hour of trial

There was news of men from two Berkshire villages.

Hare Hatch Notes

The deepest sympathy is felt for Mrs Woodruff whose son Charles Herbert was killed between April 22nd, and 27th while serving in France. Previous to joining the army he was employed at The Lodge, he was greatly respected. In addition to this loss, we hear that her son George is a prisoner of war in Germany. We trust that she will be supported and comforted by our prayers in the hour of trial.

Crazies Hill Notes

We are very glad to see Willie Hatch home again; also Charles Haycock and Harry Whetton have been home on leave. James Dow has also been home this month but only for a very short leave.’

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Easter eggs for wounded soldiers

Hundreds of eggs were donated as a special Easter gift for wounded soldiers. (They were real eggs not chocolate ones!)

Crazies Hill Notes

Mrs. Woodward once again made a collection of Easter eggs for wounded soldiers and is to be congratulated upon the success of her efforts. In money no less than £4 1s. was offered for this worthy object and 109 eggs were given in addition. 331 eggs were purchased with the money so generously given and a total of 440 eggs were distributed as follows: –

Wargrave Hospital 140
No. 1 War Hospital at Reading 100
Henley Hospital 100
3rd London General Hospital, Wandsworth 100

It is to the last named Hospital that the work done by the Crazies Hill Working Party is sent.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

“His splendid bravery inspired all troops in the vicinity to rise for the occasion”

An experienced officer who in peacetime had worked managing a Wargrave estate was one of the few to be honoured with the Victoria Cross for his great courage. Oliver Spencer Watson (1876-1918) is buried in France.

The Late Lieut.-Col. O. C. Spencer Watson, V.C.

A supplement to the “London Gazette” of May 8th gave the following particulars respecting the award of the V.C. to Lieut.-Col. O. C. Spencer Watson, D.S.O. (Reserve of Officers), late King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry:

“For most conspicuous bravery, self-sacrificing devotion to duty during a critical period of operations. His command was at a point where continual attacks were made by the enemy in order to pierce the line, and an intricate system of old trenches in front, coupled with the fact that his position was under constant rifle and machine gun fire, rendered the situation more dangerous. A counter attack had been made against the enemy position, which at first achieved its object, but as they were holding out in two impoverished points Lieut.-Col. Watson saw that immediate action was necessary, and he let his remaining small reserve to the attack, organising bombing parties and leading attacks under intense rifle and machine gun fire.

Outnumbered, he finally ordered his men to retire, remaining himself in a communication trench to cover the retirement, though he faced almost certain death by so doing. The assault he led was at a critical moment, and without doubt saved the line. Both in the assault and in covering his men’s retirement he held his life as nothing, and his splendid bravery inspired all troops in the vicinity to rise for the occasion and save a breach being made in a hardly tried and attenuated line. Lieut.-Col. Watson was killed while covering the withdrawal.”

“The Times” of May 11th gave the following particulars, respecting Lieut.-Col. Watson: –

He was the youngest son of the late W. Spencer Watson, F.R.C.S., and was educated at St Paul’s and passed into the Army from Sandhurst, being gazetted to the Yorks Light Infantry in 1897. He was invalided in 1904, after taking part in the Tirah campaign 1897-1898, in which he was dangerously wounded, and in the China campaign of 1900, receiving the medal for each of these campaigns, in the first case with two clasps.

In 1910 he joined a Yeomanry regiment, and on the outbreak of war went with them to Egypt as captain and took part in the fighting on the Gallipoli Peninsula. Promoted major, he came home to join a battalion of the Y.O.Y.L.I., going with them to France early in 1917. In May of that year he was dangerously wounded at Bullecourt, and received D.S.O. for gallantry and leadership.

He returned to the front last January, although he had not recovered from the effect of his wound; was shortly afterwards promoted lieut-colonel, and was killed in action on March 28th. Lieut-Colonel Watson was a keen sportsman, and was known locally as a good cricketer, boatman, and footballer, as well as a straight rider to hounds. Up to the time that he joined the forces in the present conflict he had been the estate agent to Sir Charles Henry, Bart., M.P., at Parkwood, and managed the Farm at Crazies Hill.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Immediate help in an emergency

With many clergy acting as army chaplains, a former chaplain who had got stuck in England when the war started was helping out a Berkshire church.

Crazies Hill Notes

General sympathy is felt for the Rev. W. G. Smylie who has had a serious breakdown of health, which occurred quite suddenly the first week In March. He is now at the Bournemouth Hydro and the doctor gives a very good report of his progress. It is hoped that he will return in a month’s time thoroughly restored to strength.

The Bishop referred the Vicar to the Diocesan Clerical Agency for immediate help in the emergency. The Agency is in constant communication with a number of Clergy all of whom are licensed by the Bishop of Oxford for work in this diocese. The Vicar was thus introduced to the Rev. C. S. G. Lutz who was a tutor with Mr. Pritchard in Wargrave many years ago. Mr Lutz has been an Army Chaplain in Malta and Gibraltar. At the time of outbreak of war he held an S.P.G Chaplaincy on the Continent but was in England on leave.

Wargrave parish magazine, April 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

An almost miraculous escape

The SS Aragon was carrying troops to Egypt when it was sunk. One of the survivors was a Wargrave man.

Crazies Hill Notes

We congratulate Joseph Carr on his almost miraculous escape while stoking in the ‘Aragon’ when it was torpedoed.

He has been home on a short leave and looks cheerful and well.

While writing we also hear that William and Herbert Plested have come home, and the former who has been in the United States for nine years will find many changes in the place and population.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

“If a sufficient number could spare one vegetable a week instead of one or two giving a large quantity the result would be very satisfactory”

A soldier stationed in Italy wanted to play football with his friends.

Crazies Hill Notes

Contributions of Vegetables for Wargrave Hospital will be gladly received on the Tuesday, during the Working Party. One vegetable will be very acceptable. If a sufficient number could spare one vegetable a week instead of one or two giving a large quantity the result would be very satisfactory.

Hare Hatch Notes

A Letter has been received from Sergt. W. Rixon, who is stationed in Italy, asking for a football. We are sure that the kindness of those friends who contributed to this need, will be greatly valued by him.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)