A Committee for “Welcome Home”

A Methodist Church in Reading welcomed home its men who had gone to war. The building is now the Sikh temple.

24 April 1919

Resolved…

That the following form a Committee for “Welcome Home”.

Messrs M Timbrell, A W Reed, F Charlton, H G Butler, W J Hambling, J S Neale, E W Butler, J Kimber.

Mesdames Slyfield, H J Butler, H G Butler, G Peach, H Gill, M Timmbrell, B Charlton, M Wise.

Cumberland Road Primitive Methodist Church, Reading: trustees’ minutes (D/MS55/1A/2)

We have been glad to welcome them home

The men and women who had served the country began to return home.

A large number of our Service men have now been demobilised and we have been glad to welcome home recently, Sergeant Major Edwin Gray, Corporals A. Brown and W. Reed, and Privates A. Beal. Ed. Brant. F. Brant. H. Brant, H. Hoptroff, G. Higgs, A. Clayton, E. Culley, D. Knight, Smith, C. Streamer, S. Thurmer, R. Thurmer, C. Taylor, C. Reed. T. Wetherhall.

Ptes. Streamer and Hoptrodd we understand have elected to join the new army.

We beg to congratulate Quarter Master Sargeant H. R. Oatway on gaining the M.S.M., and Sister Constance Druce on the honour of being mentioned in despatches.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/3)

Unwounded and well

Winkfield families continued to worry for loved ones.

Our deep sympathy goes out to Mr. and Mrs. T. Brant, whose son Cecil, (East Yorks Regiment), has been missing since the end of May, and we earnestly hope that it will not be long before their anxiety is relieved by hearing news of him.

We are glad to be able to report that the parents of Pte. Robert Mitchell have had their anxiety lessened by hearing that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, unwounded and well.

We are glad to say that Pte. Charles Reed is now convalescent and has lately been at home on leave.

Privates Charles Stone and Ernest Harmsworth have joined His Majesty’s Forces.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, August 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/7)

Dolton, Murley and Reed

More Reading men joined up.

The Vicars Notes
All Saint’s District
Roll of Honour

The following additional have been sent in for remembrance at the Altar.

Albert Edward Dolton, William Ashley Murley, Ronald Reed.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, December 1916 (D/P98/28A/14)

“Rendered unconscious for 48 hours by the bursting of a trench mortar within a yard of him, and suffering from nervous shock”

Winkfield men continued to suffer.

PARISH NOTES

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.-

We deeply regret to have to record that to our list of those who have laid down their lives for their country must now be added Gunner Joseph Church, who was killed in action at the end of July. Our hearts go in sympathy to his bereaved parents and relatives, and a Memorial Service was held for him on the evening of Sunday, August 27th.

Yet more of our men have been wounded, but we are thankful to know that the wounds are comparatively slight and all are well.

Pte. Ernest Faithful has been wounded in the knee.

Pte. George Benstead has a shell wound in the knee, and is in hospital in France.

Pte. Walter Reed was rendered unconscious for 48 hours by the bursting of a trench mortar within a yard of him, and is suffering from nervous shock, but he is now out of hospital on short leave home, and we trust that time and rest will soon set him up again.

Pte. Albert Fletcher has joined 9th Royal Berks Regt., and Pte. Frank Simmonds the Durham Light Infantry.

Our prayers are asked for Pte. Charles Edward Burt, who left his wife and children in Canada to come over and do his bit for the old country, and is now at the front, and also for his brother William Burt, who went out to France last month and is now in the trenches.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/9)

Experiencing the true horrors of war

Winkfield men were facing the horrors of war as the Battle of the Somme raged on.

PARISH NOTES

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Lieut. R. Hayes-Sadler having recovered from his wound has now returned to the Front. Pte. Walter Reed and Pte. Fred Thurmer have also just left for France. We trust that they and all our men who are now experiencing the true horrors of war will have the support of our very earnest prayers at this critical time.

Six of our men were wounded in the recent big advance in France.
2nd Lieut. George Ferard had a very narrow escape from death, he was hit in three places, the result of a shell bursting at his feet, killing several of his men and blowing him away five yards. He has made a wonderfully quick recovery and were rejoiced to see him in Church on July 16th, but of course it must be some time before he is fully recovered.

Pte. James Winnen was wounded in two places, but is now doing well in hospital in England. In a letter to the Vicar he writes:

“The wounds in my leg have healed up again, but when it was put under X rays it was discovered that there was a piece of shrapnel in the centre of the bone, which is impossible to get out. My arm is getting well, in fact the doctor said he had never see a wound heel up so soon considering it was a shrapnel wound. I think I was very lucky to escape with such slight wounds. I shall most certainly come and see you when I get home. I know it will interest you to hear about my experiences in the German lines [he received first aid from a German doctor] I can’t quite realize yet that I am in England, in fact, I still fancy I can hear the guns roaring.”

Pte. Reginald Knight was also wounded in two places, but is recovering rapidly in hospital and is already up and about the wards.

Lance-Corporal Harry Rixon has been wounded for the second time during this war and so has earned two of the new gold stripes. He and his brother, Sergt. William Rixon, we are glad to hear, are going on well.

Pte. Edward Holloway has been wounded slightly and is doing well at a base hospital in France.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

‘Skilful treatment has removed the danger’ of a soldier losing an arm

Men from Winkfield continued to join up.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We have now to add to our list the following who have joined His Majesty’s Forces during last month-

Pte. Frank Brant, Royal Berks Regiment.
Pte. Sydney Ottaway, Royal Berks Regiment.
Pte. Victor Reed, Royal Berks Yeomanry.
Pte. Frank Rixon, Royal Berks Yeomanry.
Pte. Alfred Thurmer, Royal Berks Regiment.

2nd Lieut. George Ferard, King’s Royal Rifles and Pte. Jack Dean, Coldstream Guards, have just gone to the Front, and will, we trust, have a place in all our prayers.

Lieut. Cecil Ferard, R.F.A., was recently reported as wounded at Salonika, and for a time his relatives had much anxiety since no details could be obtained; and so we are glad to hear now that the wound was slight and he has now recovered.

We are also very glad to be able to report that Sergeant James Thurmer is progressing very well. At one time it was feared that he would lose his right arm, but skilful treatment has removed this danger, and he is now well on the way to convalescence.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1916 (D/P151/28A/6)

Cigarettes and whist

Recuperating wounded soldiers attended a card party in Wargrave.

Social Evening

The Committee of the Wargrave Tennis Club arranged another successful Social Evening in the Woodclyffe Hall last Wednesday, at which 110 were present including the wounded soldiers from the two Hospitals in the parish. The prize winners in the Whist Drive were:-

Ladies 1, Mrs Southgate; 2. Mrs F. Bennett; 3. Miss Franklin; Mystery, Mrs Moss; Consolation, Mrs Fidler.
Gentlemen 1, Mr A. E. Ladd; 2, Mr King; 3. Private Wakeling; Mystery, Driver Foster; Consolation, Corpl. Lock.

Mr W. E. Cain, of Wargrave Manor, kindly provided the prizes and to hi the Committee’s thanks are due. Miss E. Reed kindly gave a basket as one of the Mystery prizes. The flowers used as decorations were lent by Mr. Cain and added much to the brightness of the room. Mrs. Ward (Osterly Park) kindly provided cigarettes. Mrs. Hanson superintended the arrangements for refreshments most satisfactorily.

The Committee are pleased to hand over the sum of £2 15s. 0d. as a contribution to the V.A.D. Hospital Fund.

Wargrave parish magazine, April 1916

There are now very few indeed of military age who have not offered their services

Many men in Winkfield had responded to the renewed call for volunteers. Sir Thomas Berney (1893-1975), who actually lived in Norfolk, had been educated in Berkshire, at Wellington College.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Sir Thomas Berney has left England for the East. We trust that he, together with the now large number of our men at the front, will be remembered in our daily prayers.

Cecil Hayes-Sadler has received a well earned commission after 15 months good service as a despatch rider at the front. He obtained a few days leave home, but has now returned again to duty.

Lord Derby’s campaign for fresh recruits has met with a good response in our parish, and we believe there are now very few indeed of military age who have not offered their services. Some have been refused on medical grounds and some are waiting to be called up when their turn comes, but the following have been accepted for immediate service and have joined their regiments:-

Joseph Church, Royal Field Artillery
Daniel Taylor, Royal Garrison Artillery
Sydney Thurmer, Royal Garrison Artillery
Fred Thurmer, Royal Berks Regiment
Henry Oatway, Royal Engineers
Earnest Woodage, King’s Royal Rifles.

Privates Walter Woodage, Henry Rixon and Wallace Nickless have been wounded, but we are glad to be able to report that they are all doing well, and making a good recovery.

Lance-Corporal Charles Reed has been slightly wounded and is now home for a short rest and change.

We congratulate Lance-Corporal R. Nickless on attaining the rank of full Corporal, and Private Wallace Nickless on his promotion to Lance-Corporal.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/12)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
(more…)

Prayers for “a joyous home coming after duty faithfully and nobly performed”

In Winkfield the men who had joined up were not forgotten.

Winkfield

PARISH NOTES

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.

The following names have been recently added:
William Franklin, William Oatway, Charles Oatway, Alfred Rixon.

Privates Albert Carter and Charles Reed who were invalided home , having now recovered have just returned to the Front; our good wishes will follow them, and prayer for their safe return again when we have Peace with Honour.

We are very sorry to hear of the serious illness of Private John Williams who had only recently enlisted; our sympathies go out to his family in their anxiety which we trust will soon be relieved.

The C.E.M.S. are sending an Easter card of greeting to all who have joined the colours from this parish. The card depicts our Saviour on the battlefield “unseen yet ever near,” and the assurance “At our Easter Communion we are praying for you” accompanied by the message

“The members of the Winkfield Branch of the Church of England Men’s Society send their cordial greetings and the assurance that, whilst you are away from home bravely doing your duty for King and Country, you are constantly in our thoughts and prayers, that you may preserved safely in body and soul, and have a joyous home coming after duty faithfully and nobly performed. Hearty good Easter wishes.”

Winkfield District Magazine, April 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/4)

Children watch soldiers practise building pontoons

The children of Purley had an outing to watch soldiers based in the area practise building pontoons across the River Thames. There was some doubt about the educational value of this trip, as the school log book records:

19th April 1915The children, forty in number, were taken along the river bank, nearly to Pangbourne, at 1.45pm to watch the soldiers build rival pontoons.

Copy of letter received from the Education Secretary [not actually received until 23 April]:

“I have seen HM Inspector and have talked over the proposed school visit to the Pontooning Ground. He agrees with me that it is difficult to lay down any rule as to the educational value of such visits, as this must depend on the way in which the teacher deals with the subject. In this case he would not with-hold consent, but would expect the teacher to take the whole of the upper school according to their class or classes and to give a lesson beforehand to teach them what they had to observe and a lesson after the visit during which they would record what they had seen. The teacher’s notes should be presented to show the character of the instruction. If Miss Reed is prepared to conduct her visit in this way, HM Inspector will not raise any objection to is being counted as a school meeting”.

Purley CE School log book (C/EL85/2, p. 74)

A fight for liberty and honour

The Winkfield parish magazine had news of local soldiers, and a report on the Christmas gifts sent out to the Front. It also took a look back at the lessons of history and the possible meaning for the present war.

We have heard with regret of the death in action of William Cartland, aged 21. He was severely wounded and died the same day.

William Cartland lived here until he enlisted in the Army about three years ago; he was confirmed in 1909, and was a communicant and member of our Guild. He will be deeply mourned by many friends in Winkfield who loved and respected him, and much sympathy is felt for Mrs. Cartland and family in their great loss.

Our wounded.
We welcome home Pte. Albert Carter for a brief rest and convalescence.

Pte. Charles Reed who left for the Front only a few weeks ago, is in hospital at Southampton with frost-bitten legs and rheumatic fever, but we rejoice to hear that he is already convalescent; also that Pte. Charles Lunn, who was wounded, is progressing well in hospital.

We much regret that no further news has been heard of Pte. Charles Streamer, who was reported wounded. It was thought that he was in hospital in England, but the War Office can give no news of his whereabouts, and much sympathy is felt for his relatives in their great anxiety.

We were delighted to see at the beginning of the month Cecil Hayes-Sadler who obtained a few days well earned leave from the Front after some months of most useful and hazardous work as a despatch rider. Mr. Hayes-Sadler has the honour of being the first of our Winkfield Volunteers to get out to the Front.

‘15

In the days when Britannia’s rule of the waves was being established, “the Fifteen” was a common phrase in England to describe the attempt of the “Old Pretender” to regain the crown which his father James II., lost by interfering with the liberties of the English people. A. D. 1715 was the date of that attempt. Few of us, in the present time of trouble, are likely to forget another “Fifteen,” when on June 18th, 1815, 22,000 British Soldiers with a mixed force of 45,000 allied troops withstood 80,000 French veterans on the field of Waterloo. That, too, was a fight for liberty and honour. But the greatest “Fifteen” of all was seven hundred years ago. John, King of England and France had made one of the many attempts of the Norman Kings to destroy the customs and freedom of the English over whom he ruled. At the Island of Running-mead in the Thames Valley, on June 19th, 1215 he was brought to book, signing the Magna Charta, which has since become the charter of freedom not only in England but of the whole civilised world. Again and again John’s successors have tried to revoke that charter – again and again they have been brought to book. At last England grew tired of the incessant struggle and banished the last to break the peace of the realm (James II.). This settled the question, perhaps for ever. Is it too much to hope that out of 1915 may come a similar judgement on rulers who break the peace of Europe?

SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ CHRISTMAS PRESENT SCHEME.

This has now reached a satisfactory conclusion, and 51 parcels have been dispatched. The following warm things were sent out : 24 undervests, 22 pairs of gloves, 8 pairs of socks, 9 helmets, 2 mufflers, 7 mittens, 2 knitted purses, 1 belt, 4 dozen khaki handkerchiefs, 4 air cushions, 2 other presents; and each parcel contained also such items as these: cigarettes, matches, candles, chocolate, soap, string, writing paper, safety pins, a “first aid” to French, and cough lozenges.

Miss Montgomerie wishes to thank all those who helped to bring this undertaking to a satisfactory issue, especially Mrs. Brant and Miss. Jenden, both of whom have given most kind assistance.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District MonthlyMagazine, January 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/1)

The right sort

By December 1914 the village of Knowl Hill had given 76 young men to the armed forces. Now it faced the sober reality of the news that several had lost their lives.

Collections for Waifs and Strays Society at Evensong on the 20th, and on Christmas Day at the 7 a.m., 8.30 a.m., and 11 a.m. services. Like others this Society is making a special effort to be helpful at this terrible war time. It hopes to assist some orphan children.

We are much grieved to hear the news about the death of H. Woods, one of our soldiers at the front. We trust there may be some mistake, as there is as yet no official confirmation of the news. He would leave a widow and two little children, for whom we should all feel deep sympathy. We have also heard with deep regret of the death of Mr. Blackman’s soldier son, and of Oliver Reed, an able seaman, drowned when H.M.S “Good Hope” was sunk in the engagement off the Chilian Coast on Nov. 1st. Oliver Reed was a much liked and excellent footballer in this neighbourhood.

We are, alas only able to record this month the names of two new soldiers from our parish, Charles Hopgood and John Light, thus making our list 76; but these two are the right sort. Ought not our number to be at least 100? We hope the excellent letter sent to each household by the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee will be thoughtfully read. Putting off decision to do right is very fatal. The Vicar will most gladly lend the letter to any who may wish to read it.

Knowl Hill section of Wargrave parish magazine, December 1914 (D/P145/28A/31)

The joy of giving, the sorrow of loss

Cranbourne churchgoers mourned the loss of a brilliant officer, while even the children were helping to support soldiers from the area.

All our heartfelt sympathy has been given to Mrs. Phillips and Miss Phillips in their great loss. Major Edward Hawlin Phillips D .S. O., R. F. A., was an officer with a brilliant record, and his friends looked forward to a still more brilliant future for him, but in the Providence of God he has been taken. R. I. P.

SUNDAY SCHOOL.
The Sunday School has been turned into a Reading and Recreation Room for the Soldiers. Tea and refreshments are to be provided each evening. Sixteen ladies are to be in charge from 4. p. m. to 7 p. m. and the members of the C.E.M.S., assisted by the Scouts, from 7. p. m. to 9 p. m. many kind gifts of games, tables, papers &c., &c., have been received from Mr. Asher, Colonel Cross, Mrs. Foster, Mrs. Edwards, the Misses Ravenhill, Mrs Barron, Mrs Goldfinch.

* * *
We are trying to do what we can to give a little pleasure to our Soldiers at the Front. The Sunday School children wish to experience the joy of giving, they have undertaken to look after two men in the 28th Battery R. F. A., 9th Brigade, 7th Meerut War Division.

The children being their pennies and half-pennies each Sunday, and in this way we are able to keep our two soldiers supplied with little comforts every week. We have already sent two parcels, and we hope soon to hear of their safe arrival.

During the next few months, while we are unable to use the Sunday School we shall be glad if the children will bring their money to Church in the afternoon, and Mrs. Burdekin will receive it after the service.
* * *
The following is a list of the names of old Scholars of our School who are now serving in His Majesty’s Forces:-

A. Brant, E. H. Brant, A. Cox, W. Cox, E. Curtis, W. L. Clarke, C. Goodchild, G. A. Hawthorn, F. Harris, T. W. Harris, J. Herridge, E. Mapp, C. Platt, W. Reed, C. Reed, W. Woodage, G. Watts, T. A. Ward, G. Weston, G. Walls, L. Walls.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/12)