Recently wounded

A Reading man was wounded.

Wounded.

We regret to say that one of our boys has been recently wounded – Lance-Corpl. Harry Wheeler, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Wheeler. He was returning from sentry duty when he was hit in the face through a shell bursting near him. We sincerely sympathize with him, and we hope his wound is not very serious. Harry is an old Sunday School boy, and a regular attendant at our little Church.

Trinity Congregational Church magazine, June 1917 (D/EX1237/1)

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Regular orders for definite hospitals

The Wargrave Surgical Dressings Emergency Society was now run on more organised lines.

Wargrave Surgical Dressings Emergency Society

Since April 25th, 1915 to January 9th, 1917, the Surgical Dressings Emergency Society has sent out from Wargrave Station – to Casualty Clearing Stations, Hospitals in France, in Gallipolli, Mesopotamia and Salonica,

344,866 Dressings
8,447 Comforts such as Shirts, Pyjamas, Shoes, Bed Jackets, Mufflers etc.

The Society is now working under the Director General of Voluntary Organizations (War Office) and he has somewhat changed the system of working.

We have now regular monthly orders for definite hospitals; a certain number of Dressings and Comforts to provide –

Dressing Gowns, Slippers, Bed Jackets, Handkerchiefs, Towels, and Socks are needed next month – besides the Dressings.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

The importance of spraying potatoes this year

The latest technology was put to use to maximise food production.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION.

On June 29th a meeting was held at the Men’s Club, Winkfield Row, to discuss how the best use could be made of Mr. Asher’s generous gift of a spraying machine for use in the parish. The Vicar presided and explained the importance of spraying potatoes this year. A working Committee was elected, and anyone wishing to utilize their services should inform Mr. T. Beal without delay.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/8)

“One never heard a voice of protest against the excesses of this war”

After he had an operation in early June, British expat Will Spencer went to Meiringen in the Bernese Oberland. A Swiss acquaintance expressed strong views against war in general.

29 June 1917
After dinner Herr Nachenius remained chatting with me on the terrace for a little while. He is against retaliatory measures, & that not only because he believes that to refrain from them has the best effect in the long run, but on higher grounds. By this it was clear to me that he meant that men should strive to act in accordance with what they believe to be their highest instincts, without regarding the consequences. He regretted that one never heard a voice of protest against the excesses of this war, a voice such as Gladstone’s in the past. (This to me alone as I was walking with him towards the chalet.)

Diary of Will Spencer in Switzerland (D/EX801/27)

The head teacher sees her son off to France

A working mother (an unusual situation at this date) said goodbye to her son.

29th June 1917
A half holiday was given yesterday to allow the Head Teacher to see her son off to France.

Coleshill CE School log book (D/P40/28/5, p. 20)

Restore oppressed nations to their rightful heritage

A new sympathy and interest were felt in our more obscure allies. It seemed appropriate at the time to look back at our Serbian allies’ historic fight for freedom from Turkey, now our mutual enemy.

The Vicar’s Notes

What is “KOSSOVO” day? It is the day on which, after fierce fighting, the Serbians came under the domination of the Turk (June 28th, 1389), and it is observed solemnly each year by the Serbian people. I hope to have a special memorial service at S. Mary’s on June 28th, at 12.15, very much on the lines of the service held at S. Pauls Cathedral last year. We ought to do all we can to shew our interest in those oppressed nations (at present under the heel of the German) which we are pledged to restore to their rightful heritage.

Intercessions
For the wounded, especially Fred Nunn.
For the missing, especially Charles Mercott, one of our servers.
For the fallen, especially William Stevens (killed in action in France on April 22nd); Tom Gray (died at the front from spotted fever); Edgar Bland and Ernest Lawrence (killed in action); Frederick Welford (Drowned in action)
R.I.P.

For God’s blessing on the efforts being made to save our country’s food.

Thanksgivings
For the progress of the Allied Arms.
For the gift of reasonable weather to help the Crops.

All Saints District
The War

We again have to mourn losses owing to the war and our sympathies will go out in abundant measure to those who are sorrowing. In Frederick Sales we have lost a former choir boy and we shall feel with his father who still has four sons in the Army, three of whom are in the fighting line.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P98/28A/15)

A follow up appeared in a later issue:

“Kossovo” Day, June 28th, was largely spoilt by the bad weather, But we were glad to see the Serbian lads once more at S.Mary’s, and we had the support of our Mayor, and of the Principal and Registrar of the University College. The Russian “Kontakion” for the departed was well sung by the Choir; and the service ended with the Serbian Royal Anthem and our own National Anthem. Our earnest prayer is that by next “Kossovo” Day our Serbian friends may be restored to their rightful heritage once more.

Reading St Mary parish magazine, August 1917 (D/P98/28A/15)

A most successful Red Cross Sale

Newington House is a grand house still standing in Winkfield, and with a lovely garden. It made a delightful spot for a sale to raise funds for the Red Cross.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION

On June 27th a most successful Red Cross Sale, organised by Mrs. Harrison was held in the grounds of Newington House. There were four stalls, the stall-holders being Mesdames Empson, Clark, A. Elliott, Druce, Hayes-Saddler, Miller, Simpson-Baikie, and Wilder. Other helpers were Miss Duchesne, Miss Aris, Miss Wells, Mr. Harris, Mr. Wainwright, and Lord George Pratt, who raffled a number of things with great success. Goods were kindly given by Messrs. Langley, Lawrence Stores, Sandwith and Wainwright. It was a perfect afternoon, and about 200 people attended, the sale resulting in the raising of a very satisfactory £46.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/8)

Several wounded since the late terrible fighting

There was worrying news for families in Mortimer West End.

West End

News of our Sailors and Soldiers

It was with deep regret that we heard of the death of Thomas Henry Dicker. He had recently been transferred to the Lincolnshire Yeomanry and was on the “Arcadian” when it was torpedoed and, unhappily, was amongst those lost. We offer our heartfelt sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. Dicker on the loss of their eldest son.

News has been received of several wounded since the late terrible fighting. James Bailey writes cheerily of his wounds and it is good to hear that Arthur Penny’s are notified as slight while Gilbert Cowdry, at the time of writing, has gone to a convalescent home. Mr. Harry Trelawny, after having slight concussion of the brain, went into the line again but is once more in hospital, suffering from shell-shock.

Charles Murrell, R.N., has been home on leave and Alfred Cowdry has joined the Royal Navy.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P120/28A/14)

A real “Godsend” to the boys

Churchgoers in Reading and Windsor paid for a recreation “Hut” behind the front lines.

Notes from the Vicar

Intercessions list

Ptes. W.G. Pearce, 2nd Worcestershire Regt,; H.A.T. Wicks, 33rd Training Reserve Batt,; H.W. March, 47th Canadians.

Missing: Lce,-Cpl. Harold Walker.

Sick and Wounded: Pte Green; Pte. Bailey.

Departed: Lce,-Cpl. J. Cole; Gunner W. Shaw. R.I.P.

C.E.M.S.

The following report has been received about the Reading and Windsor Federation Hut.

“Everything has been done to make this Hut one of the most attractive and comfortable in this area. Crowds of men pass through daily, and much use is made of the stationary Literature, and Games provided for their comfort. Concerts are held, Lantern Services and Voluntary services of all kinds. It’s a real “Godsend” to the boys.”

Subscriptions are still needed to supply the above Hut. And will be gratefully received by the Hon. Sec. Mr. Lane, 5/-

H.J. HINDERLEY, Hon. Sec.

Reading St Giles parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P96/28A/34)

Furze Platt has no lack of War Workers

The women of Furze Platt were hard at work.

Furze Platt War Working Party

The following work has been completed during the last six months:- Mosquito Nets 59, Anti-Vermin Vests 44, Sun Shields 85, Bandages 46, Shirts 21, Bags 133, Bed Socks 80 pairs, Slippers 21 pairs, Nightingales 18, Bed jackets 41, Swabs 300, Mufflers 35, Mittens 61, Socks 7 pairs, Helmet 1.

The subscriptions have fallen by about 15/- a month, as against the amount subscribed at this time last year, and the cost of wool and material has greatly risen. Thanks to having some material in stock at the end of last year, the Working Party has been able to furnish almost the same amount of goods for hospitals and troops at the front; but I should like to call people’s attention to the position of affairs, and to beg them, as far as is in their power, to keep up their subscriptions.

The fact that so much work has been done shows that Furze Platt has no lack of War Workers, and we may be proud of the fact that no work has been returned to us by the Depot as incorrectly done.

G.M. Skrine, Hon. Sec. and Treasurer

June 26th 1917

Furze Platt War Working Party

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P181/28A/26)

Mutiny in the Baltic

The Russian Revolution took a new turn.

25 June 1917

Russian Baltic fleet all mutinied.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

“There could be no Memorial so fitting as this”

Two of the Anglican churches in Clewer were thinking about memorials for the war.

St. Andrew’s Parish Church, Clewer

We hope to have a Conference of Church Workers, Members of the Congregation and any others, men or women, who wish to attend, on Monday, June 25th, in the Clewer Hall, at 8 p.m. The main subject for discussion at this conference will be concerned with the War Memorial, which it is proposed should be erected in the Parish to commemorate those belonging to the Choir, Congregation and Parish who have fallen in the War. Also with regard to the special Memorial to be erected in the Parish Church.

The exact form of the Memorial in each case is a matter that requires careful consideration and it is of the utmost importance that whatever is decided upon should be in accordance with the general wishes of the Parishioners. The Rector has a very definite opinion of his own on the subject, but does not desire to express it, till he has heard what others have to say. It has therefore occurred to him that another Conference on the same lines as those recently held in connection with the National Mission, would be the best preliminary to any further action that may be taken. Of course, the Conference has no power of final decision; but at the same time, if it should lead to anything like a unanimous expression of opinion on either branch of the subject, that opinion will no doubt have a very decided influence on our future course of action. In the case of any memorial to be erected in the Church, a Faculty will have to be applied for through a Vestry Meeting specially called for the purpose. Without a Faculty, which expresses the sanction of the Bishop, acting through his Chancellor, nothing, not even a Brass Plate inscribed with the names of those commemorated, can be placed in the Church.

We trust the proposed Conference will awaken a good deal of interest; in fact we feel sure it will do so, considering the importance of the subject to be discussed, and its direct appeal to our personal feeling and patriotism.

St Agnes’, Clewer

I feel sure that there are many who will welcome the opportunity of giving something towards our Memorial of the Fallen from this Church and District – a large Figure of our Saviour on the Cross, with Statues of the Mother of Jesus and St. John, “the disciple whom Jesus loved” – which is soon to be placed by the wayside in the garden by the Church. Such contributions are much desired, and it is hoped that they will be as generous as possible, and be sent to me as early as can conveniently be.

Everybody seems to agree that there could be no Memorial so fitting as this, which tells how God so loved the world that He gave His Only-Begotten Son: which tells of the breaking up of His Home on earth: and, in that “by His death He hath destroyed Death,” it tells of our reunion that is to come when “there shall be no more Death, neither sorrow, nor crying.” The latter words from the Book of Revelation of St. John will be in letters of gold on the front of the pent-roof.

Clewer parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P39/28A/9)

Quite a nice Australian

The Hallams invited an Australian soldier home. 22 year old Gordon Ingles had joined the Anzac Cyclist Battalion a year earlier.

24th June 1917
We had a young Tasmanian soldier in to dinner and tea – Gordon Ingles – from Hobart – quite a nice fellow.

Diary of William Hallam (D/EX1415/25)

We trust their sacrifice will be accepted

A general memorial service was held in Newbury parish church.

Mattins on the last Sunday in June [24 June] was followed by a Choral Celebration at 11.45, or thereabouts, and there were a good number of communicants as well as others present who did not communicate. The service was in commemoration of those fallen in the War, whose sacrifice, we trust, will be accepted through “the One Perfect and Sufficient Sacrifice”. A similar arrangement of services is being held on Sunday, July 22nd.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, August 1917 (D/P89/28A/13)

Well known local ladies raise funds

A big bazaar was held in Wargrave in aid of war charities.

June
A War Time Bazaar

A bazaar will be held on Saturday, June 23rd, at Ferry Lodge, Wargrave. The proceeds will be divided between the St. Dunstans Hostel for Blinded Sailors and Soldiers and the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund.

Many Ladies well-known in the neighbourhood are taking a great deal of trouble to make the Bazaar a success.

Quite a novel feature will be introduced in using different rooms at Ferry Lodge, in which the particular things appropriate to the rooms will be sold. These will include a bedroom, kitchen, drawing room, river room, etc.

Joyce’s well-known band has been engaged to play by the river, and there will be cocoanut shies, clock golf and other amusements.

The entrance has been fixed at 1/- from 3 to 6.30 p.m. and at 6d. from 8 to 10 p.m. people coming by river can moor their boats at the Ferry Lodge landing stage.

July
The Bazaar

On Saturday, June 23rd, a Bazaar was held at Ferry Lodge, and Mrs. Maxwell Hicks and her helpers are to be most sincerely congratulated upon the excellent result attained. The object was to raise funds for St. Dunstan’s Hostel, Lord Roberts Memorial Fund and Local Wargrave Charities. All these will benefit most materially, as about £600 was realised.

Lady Henry very kindly came to open the sale.

Wargrave parish magazine, June-July 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)