A seat under the lime trees would be a convenience to the wounded soldiers

A Newbury doctor treating injured soldiers made a suggestion to the borough council.

Tuesday, June 18th, 1918

Seat for Wounded Soldiers

A letter from Dr Hickman suggesting that a seat placed under his lime trees in Bartholomew Street, would be a convenience to the Soldiers, was read. The Committee agree to the suggestion, and recommend that a form [bench] be lent for the purpose, on condition that Dr Hickman can arrange to have it taken in at night.

War Bonus to Hall-keeper

The Committee recommend that a War Bonus of 5s per week be paid to the Hall-keeper.

Newbury Borough Council Estates, Markets and Bye-laws Committee minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

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Balance sheets are delightful things now-a-days

Newbury’s clergymen were rejected for war work, while the parish magazine was at risk.

THE WAR

There are reported Missing – Alfred Dennis, William Smith, Mr Barlow, and Mr Marshall; Wounded – Ernest Giggs; Gassed – Jack Smart; Prisoners – Jack Cooke and William Selwyn. We offer our sympathy to the relatives and friends.

The clergy of the diocese have received a Form from the Bishop on which they could offer for War Service. The Rector stated on his Form that he would be prepared to go to a Church Army Hut for several months if the work of the Parish could be provided for; and he has received the following reply through the Bishop’s Secretary: “The Bishop says stay where you are”.

Mr Marle offered to go to a YMCA Hut for four months, but received the reply: “The Bishop certainly thinks that you should stay where you are”.

As with our food, our clothes, and our boots, so with our paper. We are continually being faced with a new situation. After urging our readers to continue to take in the Parish Magazine, we have received a communication from the publishers of the Dawn of Day [insert] that there is serious shortage of paper, or that there will be, asking us to cut down our number of copies. However, it appears that our circulation has been so far reduced that we shall not have to ask any of our subscribers not to subscribe; but whether we shall be able to make both ends meet at the end of the year is doubtful. Balance sheets are delightful things now-a-days.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, June 1918(D/P89/28A/13)

“Not bad enough for an asylum but should go to some special hospital for shell shock patients”

A west Berkshire man was suffering from severe shell shock.

14 June 1918

G. J. Dubock

The Clerk, was instructed to reply to the Secretaries, Naval & Military War Pensions Committee, Reading, that this ex-soldier patient is not bad enough for an asylum but should go to some special hospital for shell shock patients and that the Board trust he may be removed soon and are indignant at the delay in the case.

Newbury Board of Guardians minutes (G/N1/39, p. 71)

Registration of retailers of Sweetmeats

Some people had allegedly sneakily acquired two lots of ration cards.

7th June 1918

Applications for registration as retailers of Sweetmeats were considered. The Committee, in view of the Regulations issued by the Ministry, were unable to sanction the same.

The Committee had under consideration certain information which would seem to suggest that two applications had been made, one in this district, and one outside, for supplementary ration cards, which had been granted in each case, and the Executive Officer was instructed to investigate the matter.

Newbury Borough Council Food Control Sub-committee minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

“Those who had brought many eggs gave to those who had none”

Everyone pitched in to provide eggs for a war hospital in Wargrave.

Egg Service

A very successful Egg Service was held at the Parish Church on Sunday, June 2nd. Those who had brought many eggs gave to those who had none, and each child gave an egg to the Vicar as they passed in procession to the chancel step. The Wargrave V.A.D. Hospital was thus provided with one hundred and eighty eggs.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Eggs from Newbury, meanwhile, were set to provide nourishment for seriously wounded soldiers in France.

An “Egg Service” was held at 3 pm on Trinity Sunday [2 June]: 140 eggs were presented, and the collection amounted to £1.13s.1d, this being considerably more than last year. A total of 280 eggs, or more, were thus provided for the wounded in France.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, July 1918(D/P89/28A/13)

Complaints about rationing

28th May 1918

Meeting of Sub-committee to consider a communication with reference to certain complaints which had been made by a registered customer with regard to the supply of certain food. The complaint, however, was not proceeded with, at the customer’s desire. A communication from the Ministry with regard to supplementary rations was also dealt with, and the Executive Officer was authorised, if necessary, to obtain additional help with the preparation and distribution of the New Ration Books.

Newbury Borough Council Food Control Sub-committee minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

A very vigorous lecture on the Navy’s work in the War

Grammar schoolboys in Newbury heard about the Navy – with an eye to recruiting them, perhaps?

On Tuesday, May 21st, we were treated to a very vigorous lecture on the Navy’s work in the War, by Mr. White, a chief lecturer of the Admiralty, who has been doing a tour of the Public Schools. Incidentally it was remarked how few boys we send into the Navy from the school.

The Newburian (magazine of St Bartholomew’s School, Newbury), July 1918 (N/D161/1/8)

We must continually pray for victory in this the greatest battle in the history of the World

There was more sad news for Newbury families.

We have had more losses among our old boys in the War.

Lieut. Nathaniel Gordon Burgess, RNR, serving in His Majesty’s Navy, was lost at sea on March 6th, after doing splendidly in the Service, and being clearly marked out for further promotion.

Sapper R J Drewell, one of the old CLB lads, was killed in action at Clery in France on March 23rd. His Commanding Officer writes –

“He had behaved splendidly… he will be missed by everyone”.

Mr and Mrs Wyllie have lost their only son.

There have been wounded Frederick Winkworth, Frederick Charles Darby, Percy Robert Styles, Philip Webb, a son of Mrs Tillett, a son of Mr Smart, and a late-comer into the town – Mr Hann. Several are reported missing. We offer our sincere sympathy to the relatives who are in sorrow or anxiety. We must continually pray for victory in this the greatest battle in the history of the World.

ROLL OF HONOUR [nb reno 68-79]

Copied and supplied to the Parish Magazine by J W H Kemp.
(Continued from last month.)

68. Pte Albert Corderoy, 26954, Herts Regt, killed in action in France, 22nd Sept., 1917.
69. Pte R Mason, 1st Royal Berks, killed in France, Sept. 25th, 1916.
70. Pte G Mason, Oxford Light Infantry, killed in action May 16th, 1915.
71. Killed at sea Lieut. Robert Morton Bridges Liddle, RN, December 23rd, 1917.
72. Benjamin Williams, ASC, drowned in the sinking of the SS Arragon Dec. 30th, 1917.
73. Sidney James Hughes, 1st Coldstream Guards, killed January 25th, 1915, at Quinchy, France, aged 23.
74. Pte Thomas Henry Harden Perring, aged 36, killed in action in Palestine, Nov. 13th, 1917.
75. Frederick George Hayward, 2/4 Royal Berks Transport, killed June 6th, 1917, at Tilloy Wood, France. RIP.
76. Pte E B Pounds, London Scottish, son of Mr H Pounds, 3, Enborne Road, killed in action in Palestine Dec. 27th, 1917, aged 21.
77. William James Quintin, killed in action in France, 1917.
78. Pte Albert James Geater, A Co. 1/4 Royal Berks Regt, killed in action August 16th, 1917. RIP.
79. Albert Deacon, 1st Class Steward HMS Marlborough, drowned at sea January 12th, 1918.


Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, May 1918 (D/P89/28A/13)

Compulsory powers for the use of potatoes in making bread in order to obtain uniformity within the district

Tea was set to be the next item on the rationing list.

17th May 1918

A Memo. From the Ministry of Food with reference to the proposed system of Tea Distribution based on the registration of customers, was considered. The Committee expressed themselves in favour of compulsory rationing throughout the Kingdom, but considered the ration proposed by the Ministry to be insufficient.

A Circular letter with reference to the National Kitchens Order 1918 as to the desirability of providing a National Kitchen for this area, was considered; but as the matter was under consideration of the Education Committee, it was considered desirable to await the result of that Committee’s report.

The Committee considered it desirable to obtain compulsory powers for the use of potatoes in making bread in order to obtain uniformity within the district, and the Executive Officer was instructed to communicate with the Ministry accordingly.

A special supply of jam having been obtained, the Committee decided that the same should be distributed through the medium of customers’ margarine cards, which were to be specially marked.

Surplus butter was allowed to be preserved up to 10 lbs per person until the 1st July next.

Newbury Borough Council Food Control Committee minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

Avoid rationed ham becoming unfit for human consumption

Rationing could sometimes restrict sales beyond what was sensible, allowing food to go off because no one was allowed to buy it:

9th May 1918

An application for the sale of hams was allowed at the maximum retail price of 1s 9 ½ d per lb without coupons in order to avoid the same becoming unfit for human consumption.

Newbury Borough Council Food Control Sub-committee minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

An increased butter ration

There was a glut of butter, allowing Newbury shoppers a larger ration.


30th April 1918

The Food Control Committees Local Distribution Amendment Order, 1918, was considered and adopted; and the Executive Officer was to notify the Ministry of Food of such adoption.

The Milk (Summer Prices) Order, 1918, was considered, and it was decided that the maximum retail price of milk delivered to purchasers for the months of May, June and July, should be 1s 8d per imperial gallon.

The Committee sanctioned an increase of salary to Mr Kimber and Miss Wallace.

The Enforcement Officer having reported that the accumulated stock of home-made butter was largely in excess of the normal requirements, the Committee sanctioned an increased ration to ½ lb per head for one week.

Newbury Borough Council Food Control Committee minutes (N/AC1/2/9)

The best results are obtained only by getting into touch with the men personally

Thousands of wounded or sick troops had now returned home. the nation owed them support for their service. Some needed medical help, others re-training for new occupations, or help finding jobs.

The Disablements Sub-committee beg to report that they have been notified of approximately 2,524 disabled soldiers and sailors discharged into the county. Of the cases now entered upon the Register, which exclude those being investigated, the numbers specifying disabilities are as follows:

Amputation of leg or foot 51
Amputation of arm or hand 34
Other wounds or injuries to leg or foot 353
Other wounds or injuries to arm or hand 147
Other wounds or injuries to head 69
Other wounds or injuries 192
Blindness and other eye affections 77
Heart diseases 217
Chest complaints 93
Tuberculosis 101
Deafness and affections of the ear 72
Rheumatism 151
Epilepsy 37
Neurasthenia 47
Other mental affections 31
Other disabilities 532

Of this number all have been provided with a Medical Attendant [i.e. a doctor] under the National Health Insurance Act, and special treatment, including the supply or repair of artificial limbs and surgical appliances, has been provided in accordance with the recommendations of Military Authorities, Medical Boards or ordinary medical Attendants.

From the 1 April 1917, 280 cases have received Institutional treatment – both in and out-patient – at Military Hospitals, Civil Hospitals, Sanatoria, Cottage Hospitals or Convalescent Homes.
The total number of tuberculous soldiers and sailors to date is 101, and of these 72 have received Institutional treatment within the County under the County Scheme and three have received Institutional treatment outside the County Scheme. This treatment is provided through the County Insurance Committee.

The Committee has assisted with Buckinghamshire War Pensions Committee in the provision of a new wing for Orthopaedic Treatment at the King Edward VII Hospital, Windsor. This, which was urgently needed, and will be of the greatest benefit to men in that part of the county, will be opened in the course of two or three weeks. The Committee has also been instrumental with the Buckinghamshire Committee in obtaining the approval of the Minister of Pensions to a proposed Scheme for the provision, equipment, and establishment of a special hospital for totally disabled soldiers and sailors at Slough and an assurance from the Ministry of adequate fees for maintenance thereof. Her Royal Highness Princess Alice is forming a provisional Committee, and we have every hope that the proposed arrangements will e speedily carried into effect.
(more…)

Income from the treatment of discharged soldiers has been very large

Newbury District Hospital was profitting from treating discharged soldiers.

The Chairman’s Statement

The Chairman said with regard to the report and the accounts, he would make a few remarks only. They would have seen from the report that the character of the Hospital’s work was very similar to that of the previous year. For the first time they had a small out-patients department for the purpose of treating discharged soldiers who required some special treatment such as massage. Their income from the treatment of soldiers had been very large, but it was not only from the military that their income had increased. Every single item of the ordinary income showed an increase during the year.

The Annual Report

The thirty-third annual report was as follows:-

The past year, 1917, has been a very important one for the hospital. The figures, giving the number of civilian patients admitted, show a decline compared to the previous year by 34, whilst there is an increase of 27 in the number of soldiers admitted. This is due to the extra accommodation of 24 beds in the new Annexe constructed during the early spring. The Benham Annexe was erected, at the very urgent request of the War Office, at a cost of £386.

Many very useful gifts have been received during the past year. The local branch of the British Red Cross Society have provided useful articles for the new ward, amounting to over £50, as well as defraying the cost of entertainments. Mr. Fairhurst and the late Mr. Vollar presented a large circulating electric fan for the Benham Ward. Mr. Porter, of Bartholomew-street, did the entire wiring gratuitously, and Miss Wasey gave the sun blinds. Sir R. V. Sutton kindly lent all the beds, bedding and furniture for the same ward. The Newbury War Hospital Supply Depot have again supplied a large quantity of bandages, swabs, shirts, and dressing gowns, all of which were much appreciated.

Miss Wasey organised a Pound Day, which was most successful. Many entertainments were got up by various ladies in the town and district, which were much enjoyed by the soldiers. Special donations towards the Benham Ward were received from Mrs. Caine, Sir W. Walton, Mr. Fairhurst, and the hon. sec. Mr. Tufnall sent the proceeds of a week’s Cinema performance, which amounted to £67 17s., and Mrs. C. Ward’s Garden Fete at Burghclere, realised £30 18 s.

During August the War Office transferred the distribution of soldiers from Tidworth to Reading. The Berkshire Branch of the British Red Cross Society asked us to receive paralysed soldiers for special treatment in the hospital: this was willingly agreed to, and also the promise of two beds to be allotted for that purpose. A very important service that the Hospital is doing just now, is the treatment of discharged soldiers sent to them by the Military War Pensions Committee, who have appointed Dr. Heywood as their medical referee.

Annual General Meeting held at The Newbury District Hospital on Friday April 19th 1918: Newbury District Hospital minute book (D/H4/3/2)

Laid to rest: the Newbury roll of honour

The Newbury men who had been killed were listed in the church magazine by installment.

ROLL OF HONOUR

Copied and supplied to the Parish Magazine by Mr J W H Kemp

(Continued from last month.)

45. Pte Benjamin Weller Smith, Duke of Cornwall’s LI, killed in France, June 18th, aged 24. Laid to rest at Bus, France.

46. Corp. Harry Lawes, killed in Mesopotamia 21st January, 1914.

47. Pte Ernest Westall, Territorials, died 16th June, 1916, in hospital.

48. Pte William Oscar Wickens, 8th Batt. Royal Berks Regt, missing since Oct. 13th, 1915, now reported killed.

49. Pte Bertram Edgar Wickens, Inter-communication Section 1/4 Royal Berks Regt, died of wounds April 17th, 1917.

50. Pte Gerald Lionel Wickens, 1/1 Trench Mortar Battery, 1st Infantry Brigade, killed in action August 27th, 1916.

51. Pte James Reginald Swatton, killed November, 1916. RIP.

52. Basil Henry Belcher, Royal Berks Regt, missing, believed killed, July 1st, 1916.

53. Pte Charles Whitehorn, killed in action July 3rd, 1916, 5th Royal Berks Regt.

54. Alan George Busby, killed in France June 9th, 1917. RIP.

55. In memory of Thomas Alfred Stillman, 2nd son of Mrs Stillman, of Market Street, Newbury, killed in action June 6th somewhere in France.

56. In memory of George Frederick Stevens, Qr-Master-Sergt, Royal Engineers, killed in France, July 10-11, 1917.

57. Sergt Frederick John Preston, 2/4 Royal Berks Regt, died of wounds, Le Trefont Hospital, France, 7th June, 1917.

58. L-Corp. William Crook, 94142, 128th Field Co, RE, killed July 1st, 1917, late of Diamond Cottages, Newbury.

59. Sergt W H Lake, 633 battery RFA, Indian Expeditionary Forces, died August 10th, 1916; prisoner of war in Turkey.

60. Pte Frank Pibworth, 6th Batt. Royal Berks Regt, died of wounds August 1st, 1917.

61. Pte Charles Mundy, KOYLI, killed Sept. 14th, 1917.

62. Pte Alfred John Aldridge, 16th Royal Warwickshire Regt, killed in action in France July 27th, 1916.

63. Pte Albert James Geater, A Co 1/4 Royal Berks Regt, killed in action August 16th, 1917.

64. Signalman Arthur William Stevens, 1st Devons, died of wounds in Hospital, France, October 4th, 1917.

65. Pte George Herbert Smith, 6th Batt. Royal Berks, killed in France March 10th 1915.

66. Pte James Henry Smith, 6th Batt. Royal Berks, killed in France August 27th, 1915.

67. Pte Edward Albert Smith, 6th Batt. Royal Berks, killed in action August 16th, 1917.

(To be continued.)

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, April 1918 (D/P89/28A/13)

Lonely homes and aching hearts

This poem was published in Newbury parish magazine.

“GIVE PEACE IN OUR TIME, O LORD”

O God of Mercy, God of Love,
“Our Father which art in Heaven above,
Give us this day our daily bread”;
These were the words the Saviour said,
And taught us prayer.

A sparrow’s stricken fluttering fall
Is known to Thee, Thou lovest all;
Great God in mercy let Thy hands
Fall lightly on these sorrowing lands,
And shew Thy care.

To mothers, wives and children dear,
To whom life’s future’s lone and drear,
Who long for touch of vanished hands
Of loved ones, laid in foreign lands;
Give them Thy peace.

O God of battles, shew Thy will
Unto the nations struggling still;
Support the right, Thy glory show
Unto the people who here below
Shall honour Thee.

Restore the faith, give clearer sight
Of awe, and majesty, and might;
Ambition, lust of power, displace,
Let love for others take their place,
And wars shall cease.

O God of Justice, through Thy Son,
Who taught us that “Thy will be done
On earth as Heaven”, give us the power
To say in this our darkest hour
“That we forgive”.

The broken tie Thy mercy heal,
Let lonely homes Thy Presence feel,
Fill aching hearts with Love Divine,
“The Power and Glory’s ever thine”.
Lord give us Peace.

HB, Newbury.

Newbury St Nicholas parish magazine, April 1918 (D/P89/28A/13)