“Our War Savings Association has held its last meeting”

A War Savngs Association closed.

Our War Savings Association at the Parish Room held its last meeting on March 31st, 1919. We commenced on February 26th, 1917. The membership was not so large as it might have been, owing no doubt to being late in the field, as several institutions in the town had been started. Those members who took advantage of it, however, saved consistently, and the final account, passed by the auditors, showed at that date that there were 25 members still actually saving. During the period the Association was in existence nearly 7000 6d coupons were affixed to Savings Cards for members; 206 15/6 War Savings Certificates were exchanged for members’ completed cards, and 218 Certificates were purchased outright by single payments, making a total amount saved of £328 12s 0d. only £4 14s 6d was withdrawn during the whole period. Any of the members who still wish to save can do so by means of special 6d stamps, to be obtained at the Post Office, who will also supply a card for the same. When 15/6 has been saved in this way, it will be exchanged for a Certificate at any Post Office.

Newbury parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

Advertisements

Energetic and continuous work for the Red Cross and St John’s Ambulance during the war

One Sulhamstead woman was central to the parish’s efforts to assist the wounded.

RED CROSS SOCIETY

Mrs Grimshaw has relinquished the tenancy of the Abbots House, to the great regret of all in the parish who knew her and Mrs Greenley. We hope that her five years’ tenancy has sufficiently endeared her to the neighbourhood to bring her repeatedly back on visits.

Mrs Grimshaw’s work for the Red Cross and St John’s Ambulance during the war has been energetic and continuous. Since she was first appointed as Village Representative, her small group of workers were kept steadily employed, and produced a good number of garments. During the last year upwards of 120 garments were dispatched to the Depot. Mrs Sheringham, Mile House, has undertaken the work as the Village Representative.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Military distinctions awarded to Caversham men

Caversham men were honoured for serving.

Military Distinctions Awarded to Caversham Men

Second –lieut. D.T. Cowan, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, Military Cross; Capt. C. Gentry-Birch, Royal Berks Regiment, Military Cross; Rev. C.W.O. Jenkyn, Royal Army Chaplains Dept, Military Cross; Capt. A. Hill, Surrey Yeomanry, Military Cross; Capt. (Rev) W.M. Austin, 1st Wiltshire Regiment, Military Cross; Capt. G.O. Taylor, R.E., Military Cross; Capt. E.F. Churchill, R.E. Military Cross; Lieut. Rollo, Scots Greys, Military Cross; Lieut. H.C. Powell, R.G.A., Military Cross; Sergt-Major D.E. Deane, R.A.M.C., Military Cross; Lieut F.C. Ransley, R.A.F. Distinguished Flying Cross and French Croix de Guerre with Bronze Star; Lieut. B.J.E. Belcher, R.AF. Distinguished Flying Cross; Sergt. A. Price, R.G.A. Distinguished Conduct Medal; Pte. W. Shackleton, 3rd Royal Berks, Distinguished Conduct Medal; Pte J. Girdler, Distinguished Conduct Medal; *Pte. J. Cox, 1ST Grenadier Guards, Distinguished Conduct Medal; *Pte. H. Godwin, 1ST Berks Yeomanry, Military Medal; * Pte. F. de Grunchy, 4TH Royal Berks, Military Medal; * Pte. H. Simmonds, R.A.M.C., Military Medal; Pte. F. Neale, 1st Royal Berks, Military Medal; Pte W. H. Heath, R.A.M.C. Military Medal; Sig-Cpl. F.J. Pointer, R.G.A., Military Medal and Bar; Pte. H.D. Helmore, 1st Royal Warwicks, Military Medal and Italian Bronze Medal for Valour; Gunner T.W. Shuff, R.H.A., Belgian Croix de Guerre; Mec-Staff-Sergt. J.W. Beasley, Meritorious Medal.
*Formerly members of Caversham C.L.B.

CAVERSHAM ROLL OF HONOUR
Third List
POWELL, Capt. E.I. Royal Sussex Peppard Road March 22, 1918
Bryant, Trumpet. F.N. R.E. 59, Queens’s Road July 16, 1917
Bryant, Cpl. S.C. R.E. 59, Queen’s Road
Bell, Cpl. A.J. R.E. 188, Westfield Road
Blackall, Pte. A.E.J. 2/4 R. Berks 8, Cromwell Road Dec. 7 1917
Briant, Pte. A.E.J. 6TH Royal Berks Emmer Green Aug. 15 1917
Bue, Pte. W. 27th Enniskillens Emmer Green Oct. 20 1917
Bennett, Pte. T.A. Gloucester Regt 92 Queens Road Dec. 5 1915
Bristow, Pte. H. R.E. 114, Queens Road Dec 21 1916
Carter, Pte. C. London Regt 69, Briant’s Av Nov 22 1917
Chamberlain, Pte. F. R.H.A., Berks Emmer Green Aug 28 1918
Cox, Seaman D.E. R.N. 18, Coldicutt Street Oct 1918
Doe, Bomb, S.W. R.H.A. 68, Prospect Street Nov 26 1917
Davis, Pte. J. Royal Berks 9, Donkin Hill May 31 1918
Eacott, Pte. H.W. 14TH Royal Warwicks 121, Gosbrook Rd Oct 26 1917
Fuller, Pte. F.G. Rifle Brigade 18, King’s Road May 9 1915
Goodwin, Pte. F.C. 6TH London 168, Hemdean Rd April 14 1917
Gibbins, L-Cpl. A.G. 28TH London 33, South View Av July 16 1918
Hatto, L-Cpl. H.H. 1/4TH R. Berks 111, Kidmore Rd Aug 16 1917
Havell, Pte. H.A. 2ND Ox and Bucks Emmer Green Nov 3 1917
Harrison, Seaman G. H.M.S. Victory 54, Briants Av Sept 4 1918
Higg, Pte. W. Rifle Brigade 105, Queens Road 1916
Jones, Pte, T.J. Northumb. Fus 100, Kings Road Dec 17 1916
Knight, Pte. R.R. Royal Berks 145, Queens Road Aug 26 1918
Morgan, Pte. S. Liverpool Regt 57, westfield Road June 20 1917
Martin, L-Cpl. B.E. R.M.L.I. 163, Gosbrook Road Aug 25 1918
Mott, Pte. S. R.G.A. 79, kidmore Road Sept 21 1918
Miles, Pte. G. R.F.A. 96, Kings Road July 31 1918
Nicholls, Lieut. H.G. 2nd Royal Berks 5, Queens Road May 28 1918
Nicholls, Pte. J. M.T. 3, River View Cots 1918
Povey, Cpl. J. R.H.A. 4, Queens Street April 16 1915
Palmer, Pte. H.T. 1ST Warwicks 34, George Street April 18 1918
Purvey, Pte. W. Oxon & Bucks 16, King’s Road Feb 25 1918
Purvey, Pte. E. R.A.S.C. 16, King’s Road April 12 1918
Rampton, Pte W. Labour Corps 35, Gosbrook St April 9 1918
Robinson, Pte. H. 7TH Queens 34, Priory Avenue Sept 22 1918
Swift, Pte. H.G. 3RD Rifle Brigade 31, Oxford Street May 19 1918
Semple, Pte. H. 2/4TH Royal Berks Emmer Green July 16 1916
Semple, Cadet. F.J.M. R.A.F. 23, Priest Hill Oct 30 1918

Caversham parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P162/28A/7)

Strike menace stopped

Unrest eased at home, while the situation in defeated Hungary continued to worry the allies.

28 March 1919

Strike menace stopped. Railway & miners accept terms, also transport. Coal scarce in London.

Allied troops to go to Hungary.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

We expect nothing to-day at pre-war prices

The economy had changed forever.

May we call attention to the collections for the past month. They are due to the inclement weather. Do the members of the congregation remember when they make their offerings that on the Sundays they miss, from the weather or illness, expenses go on just the same, and that, unless they make good for those missed Sundays, a debt will soon roll up? The whole question of collections must be faced. Our collections are pre-war; our expenditure is of to-day. We expect nothing to-day at pre-war prices. The service of worship should be no exception to this rule.

South Ascot Parochial magazine, March 1919 (D/P186/28A/19)

We have been glad to welcome them home

The men and women who had served the country began to return home.

A large number of our Service men have now been demobilised and we have been glad to welcome home recently, Sergeant Major Edwin Gray, Corporals A. Brown and W. Reed, and Privates A. Beal. Ed. Brant. F. Brant. H. Brant, H. Hoptroff, G. Higgs, A. Clayton, E. Culley, D. Knight, Smith, C. Streamer, S. Thurmer, R. Thurmer, C. Taylor, C. Reed. T. Wetherhall.

Ptes. Streamer and Hoptrodd we understand have elected to join the new army.

We beg to congratulate Quarter Master Sargeant H. R. Oatway on gaining the M.S.M., and Sister Constance Druce on the honour of being mentioned in despatches.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/3)

“It has helped in a small way a great patriotic movement”

Time had come for one War Savings Associaton to fold.

ST JOHN’S PARISH WAR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

There being now so few members paying in, it is proposed to make a change by asking those few remaining members to join with the GFS Association…

Our St John’s Parish Association has been in existence nearly two years. It was affiliated to the Reading Centre on 7th March 1917, though it did not begin working till a month later.

In that period 127 Single Payment Certificates and 50 by instalment payments have been issued at a cost of £137 3s 6d, with withdrawals amounted to 18/-, leaving a balance in hand in Certificates and Cash of £2 18s 0d.

The total number who joined was 42, but only 6 are now paying-in members.

The represents, of course, only a small part of the support given to the War Savings effort in the parish. The Association was started late, so that the schools and other Associations absorbed the larger amount of the savings, but it has helped in a small way a great patriotic movement.

Reading St. John parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P172/28A/24)

Too cold to expect children to sit in School and work

March 25th/26th 1919

No School – Fuel supply has given out and it is too cold to expect children to sit in School and work.

Ascot Heath Boys’ School log book (C/EL110/4, p. 102)

Stricken with Bolshevism

Hungary, which had been part of the defeated Austro-Hungarian Enmmpire, was in a highly unstable state.

26 March 1919

Johnson’s wedding day. Now Mrs Smith! Our Mr S. & Lottie went.

H & I to tea with Belgians, as farewell…

Hungary stricken with Bolshevism. Budapest isolated.

Council of 10 at Peace Conference reduced to Lloyd George, Clemenceau, Orlando & Wilson.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

“It is not only the world of nature that is pulsing with the promise of new life, we are all hoping to see a better world after the terrible days of war”

The vicar of Wargrave had a postwar Easter message.

Lent

Easter comes late this year and “Lent”, which means “Spring” should be full of the promise of its name. But it is not only the world of nature that is pulsing with the promise of new life, we are all hoping to see a better world after the terrible days of war. So our thoughts turn to the Terms of Peace and we pray for the statesmen concerned that they may be filled with the Spirit of wisdom and counsel.

We could not find a better subject for Lenten thought, prayer and effort than the Terms of Peace.

When we think of the Paris Conference we pray for such a Peace as may advance the Kingdom of God. We know that God rules over the affairs of men and is working His purpose out through human history. The policy of nations may be so directed as to obstruct His purpose. When this is so we learn from history that man may obstruct but cannot frustrate God’s will. God overrules the stubborn policy of Pharraoh and with a mighty hand He brings His people out. But it is also true that the policy of nations may be harmonious with the will of God. It is so when the endeavour is to loose the bands of wickedness, to undo heavy burdens, to let the oppressed go free and to break every yoke. “Happy is that people; that is in such a case: yea, happy is that people whose God is the Lord.”

When we think of Industrial Peace in our own country we know the terms upon which it can be secured, they are to be found within the circle of family life, where they are reorganised as being ordained of God. For by one Spirit are we all baptised into one body. And whether one member suffer all members suffer with it; or one member be honoured; all members rejoice with it. “Let nothing be done through strife of vainglory; but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves. Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others.” “Be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love.”

When we think of inward troubles, each one of the plague of his own heart, we know Who has made Peace through the blood of His cross. The terms are open to us without money and without price. “Come now, let us reason together, such the Lord; though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” “Repent and turn yourselves from all your transgressions; so injury shall not be your ruin.”

“Come unto me all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest”.

The Book of Revelation has a special message for such times as we have passed through during the last four years but it is not easy to understand. Perhaps there are some people who will like to make it a subject of special reading during Lent.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Terribly sad

One Tilehurst man survived the war only to fall victim to the terrible influenza epidemic.

CONDOLENCE

We also deeply deplore the loss of Private Norman Cane, son of our friends Mrs and Mrs Cane of 27 Brisbane Road. Norman Cane was a member of the Tilehurst Section of our church before the separation, and continued his Broad Street connection afterwards. Early in the war he volunteered for active service, and went out with the Royal Berks Regiment. He came safely through many dangers and finally reached home in February. Unfortunately he was almost immediately seized with influenza, and pneumonia supervening, he passed away. It is terribly sad, and our heartfelt sympathy goes out to his parents and the members of his family in their very sore bereavement.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, March 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

An exhausting day at Bisham Abbey

One of the staff of Bisham Abbey left as a war bride.

24 March 1919

Soldiers came in afternoon from 2.40 till 7 o’clock!! Rather exhausting. Only 12 came. All Canadians but two. H & I took them over house, & they played whist & billiards after. One man out so had to be talked to!

Johnson left us after nearly 17 years!!

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

That a Hall be erected in memory of those men belonging to or connected with Furze Platt who have served in the Great War

Furze Platt decided on a community facility as its war memorial.

St Peter’s Notices

A Public Meeting was held in St Peter’s Room on March 24th to receive the Report of the Committee which had been appointed to consider the form the War Memorial should take for the Furze Platt district. After some discussion the following resolutions were unanimously carried:

“That a Hall be erected in memory of those men belonging to or connected with Furze Platt who have served in the Great War, the said Hall to contain tablets with the names of all who have served and all who have fallen in the war.”

“That the title deeds of the Hall be vested in the Vicar and Churchwardens of the Parish, and that the Vicar should be asked to co-opt three outside people to co-operate with the St Peter’s Church Committee in the letting of the Hall on week-days, with the exception of Good Friday; that the Hall seat about 300 people; that the approximate cost be £2,000; that this sum be raised mainly by regular contributions.”

It is hoped that a desirable site might be obtained near the Church, and the Vicar pointed out that as the title deeds of the Hall were to be vested in the Vicar and Churchwardens of the Parish, there was no reason why the £300 already raised by St Peter’s people for a Parish Room should not be given to the fund for a Memorial Hall. The responsibility for rates and the upkeep of the Hall would fall on the Church Committee, but it is hoped that this would be covered by payments for letting the Hall.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, April 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

We may have a small Memorial Chapel to the Fallen

War Memorial Meetings

Fuller details will be published in the April Magazine. Probably in St Luke’s Church we may have a small Memorial Chapel to the Fallen; at Furze Platt a Memorial Hall.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

A shoot against two anti-aircraft pits

An RAF officer with Sulhamstead connections was awarded with a medal.

In the latest list of awards to Officers of the Royal Air Force, the following occurs under the heading of Distinguished Flying Cross:

Captain J H Norton, MC (Egypt)
On all occasions this officer displays gallantry and devotion to duty, notably on July 29th when, in co-operation with our artillery, he carried out a shoot against two anti-aircraft pits. On approaching this target Captain Norton was wounded in the left foot; notwithstanding this, he continued to shoot, and succeeded in destroying both pits, thereby putting out of action two hostile guns.

Captain Norton is the grandson of the late Mrs J Norton, who spent her last years at the Rectory.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, March 1919 (D/EX725/4)