We have been glad to welcome them home

The men and women who had served the country began to return home.

A large number of our Service men have now been demobilised and we have been glad to welcome home recently, Sergeant Major Edwin Gray, Corporals A. Brown and W. Reed, and Privates A. Beal. Ed. Brant. F. Brant. H. Brant, H. Hoptroff, G. Higgs, A. Clayton, E. Culley, D. Knight, Smith, C. Streamer, S. Thurmer, R. Thurmer, C. Taylor, C. Reed. T. Wetherhall.

Ptes. Streamer and Hoptrodd we understand have elected to join the new army.

We beg to congratulate Quarter Master Sargeant H. R. Oatway on gaining the M.S.M., and Sister Constance Druce on the honour of being mentioned in despatches.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/3)

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“His machine nose dived to what seemed certain death”

There were varying fortunes for the men of Winkfield.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private Charles Mitchell, who we much regret to record was killed in action on October 11th. He was only 19, and had been at the front but a few weeks. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, November 11th, at 6.30 at the Parish Church , when we have no doubt that many will show their sympathy by attending.

Stoker Karl Brant has been very ill with pneumonia but is now convalescent and home on leave.

Private Fred Fancourt has been wounded in the face; he is in Hospital in France and is doing well.

Flight Commander Foster Maynard met with an aeroplane accident which nearly cost him his life. It is reported that when flying, through some mishap, his machine nose dived to what seemed certain death, when it was held up by some branches and he sustained many cuts about the head and a badly broken arm, but is now doing well in hospital.

Private Albert Carter is ill with trench fever, he is in hospital in England and we hope progressing favourably.

We are glad to learn that Private John Carter who had a very long and serious illness, is now convalescent, also Private George Streamer is now almost recovered and able to take up light duty in Ireland.

Private William Burt has been invalided out of the Amy, the chronic nephritis from which he is suffering being brought on by the exposure and hardships of the trenches. He is much better now and will we trust in time get quite strong again.

We congratulate Sergeant Henry Oatway on his promotion to Sergeant-Major in the Engineers.

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS TO OUR MEN.

We have always remembered the Sailors and Soldiers from our Parish at Christmas, and sent them small Christmas gifts which they have greatly appreciated. Mrs. Maynard raised the fund for doing this last Christmas and the Christmas before by means of a rummage sale, but this cannot be managed this year and so we must fall back on the subscriptions as in 1914, but I am sure that we shall feel it a privilege to do our share in bringing some Christmas cheer to the men to whom we owe so much. About £15 will be required.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/11)

There are now very few indeed of military age who have not offered their services

Many men in Winkfield had responded to the renewed call for volunteers. Sir Thomas Berney (1893-1975), who actually lived in Norfolk, had been educated in Berkshire, at Wellington College.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Sir Thomas Berney has left England for the East. We trust that he, together with the now large number of our men at the front, will be remembered in our daily prayers.

Cecil Hayes-Sadler has received a well earned commission after 15 months good service as a despatch rider at the front. He obtained a few days leave home, but has now returned again to duty.

Lord Derby’s campaign for fresh recruits has met with a good response in our parish, and we believe there are now very few indeed of military age who have not offered their services. Some have been refused on medical grounds and some are waiting to be called up when their turn comes, but the following have been accepted for immediate service and have joined their regiments:-

Joseph Church, Royal Field Artillery
Daniel Taylor, Royal Garrison Artillery
Sydney Thurmer, Royal Garrison Artillery
Fred Thurmer, Royal Berks Regiment
Henry Oatway, Royal Engineers
Earnest Woodage, King’s Royal Rifles.

Privates Walter Woodage, Henry Rixon and Wallace Nickless have been wounded, but we are glad to be able to report that they are all doing well, and making a good recovery.

Lance-Corporal Charles Reed has been slightly wounded and is now home for a short rest and change.

We congratulate Lance-Corporal R. Nickless on attaining the rank of full Corporal, and Private Wallace Nickless on his promotion to Lance-Corporal.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/12)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
(more…)

Prayers for “a joyous home coming after duty faithfully and nobly performed”

In Winkfield the men who had joined up were not forgotten.

Winkfield

PARISH NOTES

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.

The following names have been recently added:
William Franklin, William Oatway, Charles Oatway, Alfred Rixon.

Privates Albert Carter and Charles Reed who were invalided home , having now recovered have just returned to the Front; our good wishes will follow them, and prayer for their safe return again when we have Peace with Honour.

We are very sorry to hear of the serious illness of Private John Williams who had only recently enlisted; our sympathies go out to his family in their anxiety which we trust will soon be relieved.

The C.E.M.S. are sending an Easter card of greeting to all who have joined the colours from this parish. The card depicts our Saviour on the battlefield “unseen yet ever near,” and the assurance “At our Easter Communion we are praying for you” accompanied by the message

“The members of the Winkfield Branch of the Church of England Men’s Society send their cordial greetings and the assurance that, whilst you are away from home bravely doing your duty for King and Country, you are constantly in our thoughts and prayers, that you may preserved safely in body and soul, and have a joyous home coming after duty faithfully and nobly performed. Hearty good Easter wishes.”

Winkfield District Magazine, April 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/4)