Stricken with Bolshevism

Hungary, which had been part of the defeated Austro-Hungarian Enmmpire, was in a highly unstable state.

26 March 1919

Johnson’s wedding day. Now Mrs Smith! Our Mr S. & Lottie went.

H & I to tea with Belgians, as farewell…

Hungary stricken with Bolshevism. Budapest isolated.

Council of 10 at Peace Conference reduced to Lloyd George, Clemenceau, Orlando & Wilson.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

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An exhausting day at Bisham Abbey

One of the staff of Bisham Abbey left as a war bride.

24 March 1919

Soldiers came in afternoon from 2.40 till 7 o’clock!! Rather exhausting. Only 12 came. All Canadians but two. H & I took them over house, & they played whist & billiards after. One man out so had to be talked to!

Johnson left us after nearly 17 years!!

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Hopes of a settlement with strikers

22 March 1919

Johnson to Reading buying trousseau. Leaving us Monday. Married next week! & off to Canada!!…

Strike postponed till Wednesday. Hopes of a settlement.

March past of Guards in London. Old Sir George went up.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

All uncertain & unrestful!

There were mixed emotions at Bisham Abbey.

21 March 1919

Miners’ meeting today – all uncertain & unrestful!

Farewell visit of Belgians. Mme Maester, De Witte & Bernard Van de Werve. They go home April 16th… Baby [grandson Berkeley Paget] very sweet to Belgians…

Johnson to be married!

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Engaged to a Canadian

The war brought romance to many due to the mass movement of young men of marriagable age. One of the longstanding maids at Bisham Abbey found love with one of the Canadian soldiers staioned nearby.

19 March 1919
Quite upset at Johnson’s departure. Engaged to a Canadian who wants her to marry & go out at once.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

PoWs weak and run down

Imprisonment was an ordeal.

XMAS PRESENT FUND FOR WINKFIELD MEN ON SERVICE.

The appeal for this fund met with a hearty response, the amount raised was £22 8s. 5d.. and nearly every family in the parish contributed.

The Vicar has received many letters and cards from the men, expressing great appreciation of the remembrance of them.

It was a great pleasure to welcome home this month two more of the prisoners of war. Fred Johnson and Fred Blau. Both showed the effects of what they had undergone, and arrived home weak and run down, but with home comforts we hope it will not be long before they completely recover their health and strength.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/2)

A Lawson Tait bed

The doctors recommended a special bed to aid in Phyllis Vansittart Neale’s recovery from influenza.

30 December 1918

Left Lawn for EVN’s flat. Luggage ready by 11 o’clock.

Called at Hospital. Found Mr Edmunds very full of “Lawson Tait” bed & mattress. So H & I took Johnson to flat & went on to Mortimer St. Heard it had to come from Birmingham.

Went Hospital & lunch at Lawn.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Still very ill

Phyllis Vansittart Neale was still very ill with the flu.

21 December 1918

P[hyllis] very weak & temperature still up, which worries them. Saw both doctors. Sat with her a little. Has sleeping draught. Still very ill. Henry & I staying at Boarding House close by Hospital. “The Lawn”. Johnson too.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Awfully ill

Complications from influenza meant an operation for Phyllis Vansittart Neale.

20 December 1918

Night nurse came 6 a.m. – said she was no better but had slept a little. Did not go in till 10.30. Looked awfully ill. Newton there. Henry & Johnson motored up from Bisham – arrived about 11. Dr said must pierce lung because of pus. Found there was, so arranged for operation soon as possible. Done 6 o’clock. They said successful. Mr Edmunds the surgeon [will?] look after her “as his own daughter”.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Hope for coalition government

Influenza meant some missed the peace celebrations.

17 November 1918

General election Dec 14th. Hope for coalition government.

Our thanksgiving services today. Johnson & I spent it in bed [with flu]. Most vexing. Dr M. [Moore] came, said I might come down tomorrow… Dorothy bad with flue.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

Laurel wreaths round Roll of Honour

Laurel leaves were a symbol of victory from the Classical world.

16 November 1918

I still in bed. Johnson too. Dorothy now bad.

Phyllis & Mary decorating church with flags & laurel wreaths round Roll of Honour.

Believe “little Willie” escaped to Holland also.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

A touch of flu

Florence Vansittart Neale caught the flu.

15 November 1918

Took to my bed & had Dr Moore. Said touch of flue to chest & right side touched. Bubbles left 9.45 so went in her room as warmer – bed very hard! Johnson also in bed. Same thing.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)

“A good few expected peace when the first notes were exchanged & are accordingly depressed”

Ralph Glyn’s sister and mother wrote to him. Meg’s circle of acquaintances in London included many army officers, and she reported some disappointment that talks of peace had not yet come to anything. Lady Mary was engaging in a private battle with the vicar of Bamber, where she and the Bishop were living, who thought the National Anthem inappropriately jingoistic for church.

Hardwicke House
Ham Common
Richmond
Surrey

27.10.18

My darling Ralph

Thank you so much for you letter & I am so sorry to hear you have got this beastly flu, it is sickening for you but by the time this letter reaches you I hope you will be quite fit again. No – flying doesn’t sound the best cure certainly, but I suppose you had to do it.

I was much interested to see the photographs you enclosed. They are copies of negatives taken by Addie of Royalist up with the Grand Fleet. If you have got the negatives it would be good of you to send them here to me, tho I cannot imagine how they got among your negatives, as I keep those ship photographs most carefully. But do send me all 3 negatives if you have them.

Jim & I stayed last night at Belgrave Square & dined with the Connaughts, a small dinner which was great fun. The Arthur Connaughts were there, she is a stick; Mr Spring Rice who was in Washington with Eustace & Ivar, & Mrs Ward who was Muriel Wilson. An A1 dinner too! The old Duke was in great form & full of funny stories of soldiers’ remarks in Palestine:

One soldier asked another, “Which is the way to the Mount of Olives?” & the other replied, “If that’s a public house I’ve never heard of it.” An Arab writing to the Governor concluded his letter with, “I write in the name of J. Christ, esq, who is well known to you & who your Excellency so much resembles”. An Australian wantonly killed a Jew & was remonstrated with, “Why did you do it?” “Well”, he said, “they are the people who killed Christ”. “Yes, but a long time ago”. “Well”, said the Australian, “I only heard of it yesterday”….

John went off to GHQ on Wednesday, & on Friday Maysie & I went over 2 houses she had the offer of in London. The larger one (both being tiny) was in Regents Park, & had lovely Chinese furniture, & nicely done up, the second in Hill Street, Knightsbridge, & very nicely done, but tiny. I strongly advised her to plump on the 2nd & she’s got it for 6 months, & I think it will do for her very wel indeed. Billy is home on leave & I saw him yesterday too. He looks v. fit, a Majr, & 2nd in command of his battalion!

A good few expected peace when the first notes were exchanged & are accordingly depressed, but everyone feels thankful & the end must be in sight. But there’s some sickness with the Americans not getting on, it would have been splendid to cut the Huns off in that retreat, but you always said they have no staff to handle the men, and it does seem 10,000 pities that thro sheer silly pride they won’t brigade their men with ours & the French, doesn’t it….

Meg

(more…)

Saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces

Boys joining the Scouts were not just having fun – they anticipated possible military service.

Several friends attended a Parade of the Windsor Forest Boy Scouts which was held on the Sunday School, on Saturday, June 22nd, when the following scouts were admitted after passing the tests of a tenderfoot. A. Kleinod, H. Hyde, R. Harrington, F. Fasey, J. Robb, A. Johnson, W. Prior, H. Welch, M. Adams, E. Payne. Mr. Asher very kindly presented the badges and Miss Ducat (a Scout Mistress) the certificate of admission. The troop was formed into a semi-circle as each Scout made the Scout’s promise, which is as follows: “I promise on my honour to do my duty to God and the King, to help other people at all times and to obey the Scout Law.” Mr. Asher then addressed the troop with kindly words of encouragement, and said he trusted each Scout would at all times remember their promise. The troop then did some staff and cart drill, and after saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces, the proceedings ended with the national anthem.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

Till we meet again

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING

Private Charles Holloway has long been reported missing, and the War Office has now sent an intimation that he must be “assumed killed in action.” Our deep sympathy is with his widow, and his parents, who have now lost three sons in this war.

Lance-Corporal Leonard Cox has been wounded and is now in hospital in England and is progressing favourably.

We were glad to welcome home on leave this month Privates Broadbent, F. Johnson, and J. Sumner.

The Vicar has received the sum of £1 from sale of waste paper collected in the parish, and this money has been devoted to providing comforts for our two prisoners of war in Germany, Privates W. Harwood and F. Onion.

We hope to send to all our men who are serving an Easter card of greeting with the message “May the Risen Christ, who left His home for us, have you in His keeping till we meet again”; and the assurance that we shall be remembering them at our Easter Communion.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)