Two more of our men killed in action

News of Winkfield men.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We have this month to mourn the loss of two more of our men killed in action, Captain Godfrey Loyd and Lance-Corporal Reginald Knight, and our deep sympathy goes out to their bereaved families.

Corporal E.H. Harris has been seriously wounded in three places, and Pte. A.E. Fletcher has been severely wounded in the leg. Both are in hospital in England and progressing favourably.

Pte. Albert Carter is also in hospital in England and is going on well.

Corporal R. Nickless is now in England and we congratulate hm on being chosen for training for a commission.

We are glad to welcome home on leave this month Corporal Ernest Gray, and Privates G. Higgs and Francis Webb: also Alec Knight and Karl Brant who have just been appointed to a ship.

Winkfield section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, January 1918 (D/P 151/281/10)

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“A communal store would have destroyed any idea among the workers that the rich could get supplied at the expense of the poor”

Union members in Reading were vigilant in the cause of rationing.

Reading and District Trade Union Branch News and Notes

General Workers’ Union

The way in which members are subscribing towards the children’s entertainment is extremely gratifying, showing that our members realise that they owe something to the youngsters whose fathers are away doing their duty.

The entertainment will be held in our hall towards the end of January…

At the District Council on December 15 … Bro. J R Clynes, MP, attended to answer an adverse and critical resolution which was on the agenda on the Food Control business. After his speech, which gave a good deal of information which his critics were not possessed of previously, the resolution was lost by a large majority.

No doubt he has a very difficult task to perform, but with our knowledge of his ability and steadfast work in the interest of the workers we do not doubt that his position has and will result in benefitting us all as consumers.

As a Union we are doing all we can locally to tackle the food question here. Bros Knight and Russell have had interviews with the District Food Commissioner and the Mayor, and also have attended a Conference with the Food Control Committee and representatives of the traders, and it is hoped that with the cooperation of the people of Reading there will soon be in operation a scheme which will ensure the equal distribution of available tea, butter, margarine, and lard. It is a pity the idea of a communal store was not accepted for this scheme. It would have been an interesting experiment, and would have destroyed any idea among the workers that the rich could get supplied at the expense of the poor. However, we must all co-operate, and not fail to report any case of departure from the regulations to the Food Control Secretary.


The Reading Worker: The Official Journal of Organised Labour in Reading and District, no. 13, January 1918 (D/EX1485/10/1/1)

The first great military award gained by a Winkfield man

A number of Winkfield men had been wounded or were unwell.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING

We regret to learn that Pte. Jack Dean has been wounded with a bullet wound through the left leg. He is in hospital in England and writes cheerfully, so we hope he is doing well.

Pte. George Benstead has been moved from the hospital in France to England. He writes to the Vicar that he is so much better that he hopes shortly to be home and able once more, for a time, to take his place in the choir again.

Pte. Fred Holmes, Pte. W. Franklin, and Pte. C. Jenden have also been wounded; they have been in England some time and are now convalescent.

Pte. C.E. Burt has been seriously ill with rheumatic fever, but is better, and we trust now out of danger.

Pte. Fred Blay joined the Army Service Corps last month and Fred Knight joined H.M.S. Impregnable.

Corporal Reginald Nickless and Privates Leonard Cox and George Faithful, having recovered from wounds or sickness have returned to the front, also Private Norman Nickless has gone out, and we trust all will find a place in our prayers.

Most of us have heard with great pleasure and satisfaction that the Military Medal (and promotion to Lance-Corporal) was won by Edwin Gray for gallantry on July 1st at Deville Wood. This good news ought to have appeared in the August Magazine, but though now belated it is fitting that a record be made in the Parish Magazine of what is, we believe, the first great military award gained by a Winkfield man, and we heartily congratulate Lance-Corporal Edwin Gray and his relatives on this distinction.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/10)

A doctor is ‘much occupied’ at the Military Hospital

A local doctor was too busy to attend civilian patients due to his role treating wounded soldiers. That meant more work fell on nurses.

Thursday 7th September, 1916
Some trouble had arisen about the case of Mrs Knight of Charvil who wished to book the nurse for confinement in September, but subsequently it was arranged that nurse should take the case as a midwifery one by the wish of Dr May whose time was much occupied at the Military Hospital – Reading.

Sonning and Woodley District Nursing Association minutes (D/QNA/SO1/2)

Experiencing the true horrors of war

Winkfield men were facing the horrors of war as the Battle of the Somme raged on.

PARISH NOTES

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

Lieut. R. Hayes-Sadler having recovered from his wound has now returned to the Front. Pte. Walter Reed and Pte. Fred Thurmer have also just left for France. We trust that they and all our men who are now experiencing the true horrors of war will have the support of our very earnest prayers at this critical time.

Six of our men were wounded in the recent big advance in France.
2nd Lieut. George Ferard had a very narrow escape from death, he was hit in three places, the result of a shell bursting at his feet, killing several of his men and blowing him away five yards. He has made a wonderfully quick recovery and were rejoiced to see him in Church on July 16th, but of course it must be some time before he is fully recovered.

Pte. James Winnen was wounded in two places, but is now doing well in hospital in England. In a letter to the Vicar he writes:

“The wounds in my leg have healed up again, but when it was put under X rays it was discovered that there was a piece of shrapnel in the centre of the bone, which is impossible to get out. My arm is getting well, in fact the doctor said he had never see a wound heel up so soon considering it was a shrapnel wound. I think I was very lucky to escape with such slight wounds. I shall most certainly come and see you when I get home. I know it will interest you to hear about my experiences in the German lines [he received first aid from a German doctor] I can’t quite realize yet that I am in England, in fact, I still fancy I can hear the guns roaring.”

Pte. Reginald Knight was also wounded in two places, but is recovering rapidly in hospital and is already up and about the wards.

Lance-Corporal Harry Rixon has been wounded for the second time during this war and so has earned two of the new gold stripes. He and his brother, Sergt. William Rixon, we are glad to hear, are going on well.

Pte. Edward Holloway has been wounded slightly and is doing well at a base hospital in France.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

Shot through the hand

There was worrying news for several Winkfield families, while the village’s children were busy collecting eggs.

We regret to have to record this month that three of our men have been wounded. 2nd Lieut, R. Hayes-Sadler was shot through the hand, Sergeant James Thurmer is seriously wounded in the right arm and thigh, and Pte. Walker Woodage slightly wounded. We hear that all three are going on well and trust that the anxiety of their relatives will soon be allayed.

We learn that Pte. Robert Thurmer and Pte. William Faithful have gone to Mesopotamia and that Pte. James Knight has just gone to the front in Flanders; let us remember them in our prayers.

Our children did their part well in the Children’s Special Week (February 21st to 28th) of effort to help forward the National Egg Collection for wounded Soldiers, and besides collecting 40 eggs they raised the sum of £3 12s. 6½d.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, April 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/4)

In hospital with a nervous breakdown

A Winkfield man was suffering from what must be shell shock while others were headed for the Front.

The following have recently joined His Majesty’s Forces.

Harry Cleverley, Royal Navy Air Service.
James Giles, Army Service Corps.
James Knight, 6th Royal Fusiliers.
Alfred Shefford, Wilts Regiment, attached 3rd East Lancashires.

Lance-Corporal Wallace Nickless, having completely recovered from his wound, has now returned to the Front.

Pte. William Franklin has been in hospital with a nervous breakdown, but is now convalescent, and we hope to welcome him home shortly.

We regret the name of Sergeant Alfred Leggatt was omitted by mistake from our Roll of Honour; the omission is now rectified.


Winkfield section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, March 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/3)

Now they know what war means

Meg Meade wrote to her brother Ralph in Egypt. She was staying with their parents in Peterborough, and had heard from her naval husband.

Peterborough
Jan 26th [1916]
My darling Ralph

I hear that the beautiful Lady Loughborough was an Australian called Miss Chisholm & she married out in Egypt the other day.

I sent the Gallipoli bomb to Miss Jackson at that Irish address. I have not yet heard if it’s arrived alright.

I sent £1 to the Home Office for permission for you to wear those foreign orders, & they have acknowledged the money without saying where the warrants have been sent to…

How I envy you in beloved Egypt, & near the Nile!

Jim writes very well, but they have no news. His destroyers are joining up every day, & the gales never stop blowing for an hour…. Jim sent me really a heavenly rhyme about Royalist & her officers which I am copying out for you. Isn’t it priceless.
Maysie will tell you all her news. Poor John has got to have his jaw cut again before it can heal.

The parents seem very well, & Mamma has a thousand irons in the fire as usual, & sometimes get her fingers burnt, but she always retaliates! She’s started a first class Red X workroom in the Knights Chamber which of course infuriates the other Cross Red women who aren’t Red X here!

There is no chauffeur & no gardeners. We live in the hall & dining room & Dad’s study. Mr Green & the housemaids are supposed to run the garden!! So Dad & I had a morning’s weeding today, one had almost to push one’s way along the Monastery Garden through the weeds. But the War has reduced all gardens to that. Dad busy with the hoe, poking, pushing & destroying, muttered pathetically, “Poor dears” & I found he was addressing the weeds!

PS I went to see Aunt Syb who is wonderful, & Joanie, who is the same, but she seemed to me so altered in the face. Something has happened to her eyes, & they seem shattered by the sorrow and shock, & who can wonder. It is so awful.

[On a separate sheet is the poem:]

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An awful, awful tragedy

Lady Mary Glyn wrote to Ralph again to let him know how her Red Cross and other war work was going.

Jan 18th [1916]…

We heard of the great doings at the G[reat] E[astern] Rest Room. Over 100 men there last night – 40 sailors, 60 men & then more, and an efficient staff of helpers. All night. Then in afternoon I … called on Recruiting Officer’s wife…

From 6 to 9 (with break for dinner) the Knights Chamber Private Registered Red X Work Party. 32 workers all in caps & white aprons and sleeves, and it is really a joy to see that Room full – all happy, and the long tables covered with clean oil baize, and your old nursery cupboard moved there to hold the material. I hear there is a tremendous “muddle” at Northampton, & as these inanities here appealed to Lord Spencer they have dragged him into their mesh of muddle, and I have written no word & keep silence, but events move, and things must take their course. Sir George Pragnell looks like a bulldog that will not easily let go, and the evidence he took from me was quite sufficient to show misapplication of money, and a vast trickery of the public they feared my action would bring to light. They would have done better to leave me alone!…

I read the papers and wish I knew what to think! Montenegro and its heights to add to the pecuniary burdens of ruined nations, but in the meantime how far adding to their resources?…

My whole love always
Own Mur

Ralph’s sister Meg also wrote to him, with thoughts on politics, and more on the Campbell family’s loss with the death of their cousin Ivar. (more…)

Highland bonnets on their way to the Tree of Life

Lady Mary Glyn wrote to her son Ralph with details of the family’s response to the death of his cousin Ivar Campbell, alongside her squabbles with a rival group of Red Cross workers.

Peter[borough] Jan. 14th

My own darling darling own son

I know how you will grieve for Aunt Syb and for the torture of that faraway uncertainty even in the certainty – 6th or 8th as date, and not having been able to see him before he left – and his not being with the Argyll & Sutherland Aunt Em thinks has added to the sore trouble, “the sore blow” as Aunt Syb calls it. She sees Aunt Far, and all his special friends – and I am sure Eustace Percy will be a comfort to her now.

I saw Aunt Syb & Joan the week before. She had been made so glad by letters on Xmas Day amd New Year’s Day. Aunt Far wrote to Aunt Eve that Mrs McDiarmuid (Tiree) had written to her, “I am thinking of the Highland bonnets on their way to where the Tree of Life grew”.

The Rest Room at the G.E. is a great success, and I have troops of helpers…. The Red X Room (Arthur Knight’s Chamber) has been most shamefully attacked by the Winfrey lot who appealed to Lord Spencer – and he has been ass enough to go in with them, and so the matter referred to Headquarters – and I keep silence knowing they are cutting their own throats.

I have had a letter from beloved old Jack asking me not to go on with the “crusade”! “That he and Lord Spencer are there.” I tell him I have made no crusade, but that registration now enforced has shown up these people as I knew it would, and their attack on me – & it must take its own course.

The answer from Headquarters is to wipe out all Peterborough organization & say only Lord Spencer & his representative can be corresponded with. So much for Winfrey & his tools – and they are in a very bad position. So I have been to see Sir George Pragnell, Chairman of Work Room Section, & told him I will do what he advises. Meantime we have a delightful brigade at work in the Knights Chamber on Tuesday evenings, registered in the name of a very clever lady doctor, and they are all splendidly keen. I knew if I did anything it would at once produce a cost, but I never dreamed that Lady Exeter would go in with Winfrey, or that committee against me! I am afraid she is quite without brains, & is making a great hash of everything she has to do with.

I keep quite cool and go quietly on, & make no reply to their attacks, and ask the workers also to keep quiet – & as many as can are encouraged to go to the Rooms they have now at last registered as a rival to mine. Supported with any amount of LSD collected in the name of the “Red X”… It is all a most disgraceful story & one day when they have me to fight no longer they will all be ashamed of themselves….

Letter from Lady Mary to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C2/3)

The war has taken fresh toll of us

People in Winkfield were asked to save money, and to help support local soldiers with sewing parties.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,-

We are inserting in this month’s Magazine a leaflet entitled “How to save and why,” and I hope that all will read it carefully and try to act upon it, for it points out how those of us who cannot go out to fight can yet help our country at this most critical time…

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

The war has taken fresh toll of us, and this parish has to mourn the loss of Lieut. Malcolm Blane of the 5th Cameron Highlanders, who fell in action in Flanders on September 25th. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Blane of Foliejon Park, and very deep sympathy is felt for them by their friends in Winkfield in this overwhelming sorrow.

2nd. Lieut. Ralph Hayes-Sadler, Corporal J.B. King, and Private Reginald Knight have now gone to the Front and will, we trust, have a place in our prayers.

Private Albert Carter has again been wounded but is doing well in a Convalescent camp at the base.

Private John Chaney was wounded in the leg and has been bought back to England; he has progressed so well that we hope soon to see him back in Winkfield, convalescent.

William Faithfull has joined the colours and his name is added to the list of Honour.

We are glad to hear that Private Charles Greathan has now practically recovered from his very serious wound; also that Lance-Corporal A. Kimble though not yet allowed out of hospital is expected home shortly.

It was nice to see Lance-Corporal R. Nickless once more in his place in the choir on Sunday, October 10th. His wound had sufficiently healed to allow of his coming home on short leave before he joined his regimental depot at Reading.

NOTICE.

With reference to the announcement which appeared in last month’s Magazine of Working Parties for the benefit of the Winkfield men at the front, it has been arranged to commence these at the Vicarage on Thursday, November 4th, at 2.30, when Mrs Maynard will be pleased to welcome any who have relations serving and who would like to make comforts to send out to them at Christmas.

It is hoped to have these meetings weekly and to hold them (after the first one) on Wednesday afternoons.

A small RUMMAGE SALE, the proceeds of which will go towards helping to provide funds for materials, &c., will be held in the Parish Room on Tuesday, November 9th, at 2 o’clock. Admission to the sale 1d.

WINKFIELD FUEL FUND.

Owing to the increased price of coal and to the uncertain state of the coal market, the Trustees have decided that Messrs. Minchin, whose tender has been accepted, shall make two deliveries only, viz, before November 4th and between Dec. 1st and 31st. The deliveries will be to depositors of 4/6- 5¼ cwt. and 4 cwt., and to depositors of 3/6 – 4 cwt. and 3¼ cwt.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
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The men of Earley serving their country

An extremely long list of men with connections with Earley St Peter were receiving the support of parishioners’ prayers.

List of Names on the Roll of Honour and Prayer List
Duncan Adams, John Adams, Henry Adams, Frederick Allen, John Allen, Frank Allum, George Allum, George Ansell, Robert Ascroft, Frank Aust, William Ayres, Henry Ayres, Cyril Ayres, Reggie Ayres, John Ayres, James Auger, Samuel Auld, Charles Barton, William Barton, Clarence Burnett, Harry Bosley, Benjamin Bosley, Robert Beeson, Walter Bluring, Gordon Brown, Leonard Brown, Walter Brooker, Charles Baker, Ernest Balding, Albert Ballard, George Breach, Phillip Breach, Ernest Breach, Alfred Breach, Percy Bunday, George Bungay, William Bungay, Charles Bolton, Herbert Blyde, Lewis Blyde, Wilfrid Blyde, Arthur Buskin, Herbert Broadbear, Louis Bunce, Frank Berry, James Bowden, Henry Blathwayt, Harold Bennett, Harry Borroughs, Henry Barney, William Brett, Alfred Broad, Harry Ching, Charles Chesterman, George Chesterman, Ernest Chapman, Edwin Coldman, Edward Cottrell, Percy Cotterell, Hubert Collier, Alfred Cooper, George Comport, Guy Comport, Frank Cook, Ernest Cook, Eric Cook, Fernand Camus, John Cane, Charles Carpenter, Charles Clarke, William Clements, Charles Carpenter, Charles Clarke, William Clements, Charles Capel, Leonard Dann, Frederick Douglas, Reuben Dowsett, Renton Dunlop, Tom Durman, Jack Durman, Hugh Deeds, Ralph Deeds, Sidney Davis, Ralph Durand, Albert Denham, Frederick Dawson, Alfred Dee, Hugh Denton, Sidney Dormer, William Elliott, Charles Elliott, Reginald Elliott, Eric Evans, Alec Evans, Ernest Embery, Cyril Eaton, Eustace Finnes, George Forge, John Forge, Henry Fisher, George Fisher, William Fisher, John Fisher, George Fulford, Bernard Fixsen, Theodore Fixsen, William Farmer, Bert Farmer, Arthur Fulker, Cecil Fowler, William Fowles, Charles Goddard, Guy Goodliffe, Ernest Gowers, George Grey, Cecil Grey, Victor Gaines, Reginald Gatehouse, Herbert Garlick, Charles Phillips Groome, Samual Gould, Wilfrid George, Frank George, Gilbert Green, Frederick Goodger, Richard Goodall, Leslie Grinstead, Albert Howlett, Frederick Hearn, Arthur Hearn, Bert Hearn, Harry Harding, George Harding, Albert Harwood, William Harwood, George Harwood, Charles Haines, George Hitchcock, Albert Hitchcock, Henry Hayward, Percy Hamilton, Frank Hawkins, Albert Hosler, William Hall, Albert Hall, Henry Hall, George Hall, William Hall, Francis Harris, Arthur Harris, Richard Hayden, Fred Hull, Charles Hague, James Hague, Stanley Higgs, Leslie Heelas, Leonard Hedges, Harry Hambleton, Reginald Hawes, William Hope, Jack Howlett, Percy Howlett, Bertie Iles, Edward Iles, Percy Ilott, Thomas Ilott, Albert Ilott, Melville Innes, Walter Jeskins, Albert Jerome, Alfred Jerome, Walter Jerome, Frederick Jerome, George Jerome, Charles Jefferies, Henry Jones, Leopold Jenner, William Jeram, George Jeram, Henry Jeram, Woolf Joel, Alfred Jacobs, (more…)

This war and its terrible stress forces men to face reality

The vicar of Winkfield noted that some churches were full under the stresses of war – which he expected to last at least another year.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

Soon after you get the February Magazine Lent, which falls very early this year, will have begun with its call to thoughtfulness and self-examination. And surely this War Year, the solemn Lenten Season will more than ever have its special message for all, and will be a “Call to Worship” to many who have neglected its opportunities in the past.

Our Nonconformist brethren have for some time been organising a “come to Church” campaign, and in most places attendance at public worship has largely increased, because this war with all its terrible stress and anxiety and forces men to face realities and is teaching us to look at the higher issues of life. May we then try to learn the lessons God would teach us by this trial and resolve to make a better use than ever before of this coming Lent; use to the full all the opportunities of public worship and make it a time of specially earnest private prayer for our brave Sailors and Soldiers, our Parish and our Country.

The calls on us during this time war are great, but I hope we shall not allow our usual Lenten self-denial savings purses for the Waifs and Strays to suffer; and that many will apply to the parish clerk or to myself for these purses.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.- A new list, kindly written out by Mr. Empson, has been made up to date and placed in the Church porch; the list now contains 60 names the following having been recently added:-

Bert King, Reginald Knight, Godfrey Loyd, Vivian Loyd, J. Franklin, Frank Payne, Leonard Tipper, Edward Still, Claud Williams, John Williams.

RED CROSS SOCIETY. – Since the war began the following articles have been forwarded from the Winkfield Branch to the Berkshire Branch at Reading.
140 day shirts, 72 night shirts, 29 bed jackets, 77 pairs of socks, 14 helmets, 16 pairs of operation stockings, 44 belts, 136 bandages, 29 pairs of gloves, 20 pairs of mittens, 5 pairs of bed socks, 9 comforters, 37 cushions.

Up to January 1st the Berkshire Branch sent out 2630 shirts; socks, 2790 pairs; vests, 1688; comforters, 540; night shirts, 700; mittens, 530; bed socks, 650. Of these a large number has been received by the Berkshire Regiment.

A satisfactory feature has been the large number of articles made by the mothers at Mrs. Ferard’s working parties. The value of the articles amounts to £55. To this, kind contributions have been given by Mrs. Asher, Mr. H. P Elliott, Lady Finlay, Mrs. Wilder, Mrs. Hayes Sadler, Mrs. Blakiston, Mrs. Louise Holt, Mrs. Ferard, Miss Thackrah.

It is hoped that further contributions may be received, for the work must not stop. So far as can be seen the stress of war will last another year at least and will seriously affect all of us remaining in England. But we should make every effort not to neglect those who are fighting for the defence of our lives and homes.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)

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