Death at Aden

A tragic death on the way home.

CONDOLENCE

We were all much grieved to hear of the sad loss which our old friend, Mrs Hussey of 32 Northumberland Avenue, had sustained in the death of her son at Aden, when on his way home after service abroad in the army.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, May 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

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An opportunity for all whose hearts are stricken to have their part in honouring those whom they love

The Remenham war memorial was fully funded by a generous bequest, but it was felt that others would appreciate being able to contribute.

The Executors of the late Mr Wilson Noble have kindly agreed that all who desire to do so shall have the opportunity pf contributing to the cost of the Tablet to be placed in the Church to the memory of the officers and men who have fallen in the War. No formal appeal for contributions towards this object will be issued beyond what is here stated, but any sum, large or small, can be sent to the Rector, and he will hand over the amount collected to the Executors; he desires it to be very clearly known that no one should be deterred from co-operation because of the smallness of the sum he or she is able to send. It is not a case of any need of money, but is an opportunity for all whose hearts are stricken to have their part in honouring those whom they love.

Remenham parish magazine, May 1919 (D/P99/28A/5)

Peace finally settled – “Thank God for that”

The news of the signing of the peace treaty was made public.

28th May 1919

To-day I paid in the Co-Op. 1S.10d in cash and our dividend 18S 2d to make up 6£ in there…. When in there heard the hooter blow that Peace had been finally settled. Thank God for that I said to myself.

Diary of William Hallam (D/EX1415/25)

We should cherish the memory of those who had laid down their lives to protect us

WE have lost in the war a large number of men who were educated in our Parish Schools, and it was felt it would be fitting that their names should be inscribed on a Roll of Honour to be hung in the Schools as a Memorial.

Mrs. Daubeny very kindly undertook the work, and on May 30th, brought a framed Roll of Honour, beautifully illuminated by herself, and presented it to the School in the presence of the Managers, some parents and other friends.

In well chosen words Mrs. Daubeny made it clear to the children why we should cherish the memory of those who had laid down their lives to protect us, and how their example should always be a srimilis…, and their names and brave self-sacrifice never be forgotten.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/7)

About to return

A schoolboy got an early finish to see his soldier dad.

May 26th 1919

William Newell was allowed to leave school before the close of the afternoon session by request of his father, a soldier from France, about to return.

Bradfield CE School log book (D/P22/28/2, p. 222)

How the Declaration of Peace (when it comes) may fittingly be celebrated

Burghfield got cracking with memorialising the war.

May

A framed list of Burghfield men who have given their lives in the War has been drawn up by the Rector, and hung in the Church near the Lectern.

War… and Peace

A General Meeting, open to all parishioners, will be held in the New Schools, Burghfield Village, on Monday, 26th May, at 7 o’clock.

Objects:

1. To discuss the question of a Memorial of the part played by Burghfield in the War.
2. To consider how the Declaration of Peace (when it comes) may fittingly be celebrated in the parish.
3. And, if thought right, to appoint a Committee (a) to prepare recommendations for submission to a second General Meeting; and (b) to raise funds.


June

The War… and Peace General Meeting

This was held according to notice, on Monday, May 26th, in the C of E School, and was well attended. On the proposition of Mr Willink, Mr Job Lousley, as Chairman of the Parish Council and Parish Meeting, was voted into the chair. In a few well-chosen words, he explained the objects of the meeting, as stated in last month’s magazine, and asked for remarks. After several suggestions had been made, and noted for consideration, it was agreed to appoint a Committee of 20, with power to add three or four to their number, to report to a further general meeting for approval, and the following were elected accordingly, viz: Messrs F Aldridge, C Chamberlain, E Chance, Major G Chance, R Davidson, Lieut. F E Foster, F C Higgs, Col. R Kirkwood, H C Layley, J Lousley, M H Parfitt, A J Pearse, G Pembroke, Lieut. A Searies, F T Wenman, E Wigmore, H G Willink, and E Wise; also Mrs Butler and Miss Goodall. Mr H D Higgs kindly undertook to act as Hon. Secretary. The Committee will hold their first meeting in June, and it is hoped that any persons having suggestions to make will communicate at once with them.

Burghfield parish magazine, May-June 1919 (D/EX725/4)

“The Fund will enable many Sailors and Soldiers to be trained as Clergy”

The Vicar’s Letter

Dear Friends and Parishioners

Lastly, I venture to draw your attention to the Collection on May 25th for the Central Church Fund. This day has been set apart all over England for this object. Amongst much other work the Fund will enable many Sailors and Soldiers to be trained as Clergy.

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar,

C E M Fry

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, May 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

Another opportunity of setting foot on English soil

A soldier celebrated Empire Day with his wedding to an old friend.

MARRIAGE

On Saturday, May 24th, two of our old Sunday Scholars were married in our Church by the Pastor. We refer to Mr R B (“Dick”) Wilkins and Miss Rosina Blake. The bridegroom has been for some years away from Tilehurst, having been in residence in Canada, but on the outbreak of war he joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and in the course of his career as a soldier he gained another opportunity of setting foot on English soil.

By a curious coincidence it was “Empire Day” when he enlisted, “Empire Day” again when he first crossed to France, and yet again “Empire Day” when he entered upon married life. The wedding was quite a simple ceremony, marked by earnestness and sincerity, and the large congregation was ample evidence to the young couple of the good wishes which they were receiving from many friends.

We trust that the demands of military service will soon cease in Mr Wilkins’s case, and that he and his wife will be able to settle happily in their far off home across the seas. They know we all wish them the very best…

Tilehurst section of Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, July 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

“The influenza epidemic put a great strain on the hospital”

A Newbury hospital reflected on the challenges of the last year of the war.

Annual General Meeting held at The Newbury District Hospital on Wednesday May 24th 1919

The Committee’s Report

The Managing Committee reported that the year had been an interesting and difficult one, there having been many changes in the staff. The influenza epidemic put a great strain on the hospital, as a large number of pneumonia cases were received, and the staff were laid up. Notwithstanding these difficulties, an unusually large number of patients were treated during the year. As compared with 1917 civilian patients increased by 104 and soldier patients by 38. It would have been impossible for the small staff to have coped with this work without the help of the Newbury Voluntary Aid Detachment and some other ladies, all of whom rendered most valuable assistance. The committee acknowledged the general interest in the hospital evidenced by the gifts of vegetables, supplies and other useful articles throughout the years.

Newbury District Hospital minute book (D/H4/3/2)

In memory of the men of the Albert Works who fell in the War

The Albert Steam Joinery, run by local firm Elliotts, had sent many of its workers to the war.

A well-attended service was held on May 24th, in memory of the men of the Albert Works who fell in the War, and when the new carved Litany Desk is presented by the Works was dedicated. It is a very handsome piece of work. Mrs Clifford Phillips sang “I know that my Redeemer liveth”, and “The Last Post” and the “Reveille” were sounded by two Buglers from Reading. The choir was present, and Mr Liddle played several appropriate pieces on the organ. We were glad to see a number of the employees of the Works present.

Newbury parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

“Peace was signed to-day but this settlement has been so long about all the excitement had died out”

The war was now officially over.

24th May 1919

Peace was signed to-day but this settlement has been so long about all the excitement had died out.

Diary of William Hallam (D/EX1415/25)

“It is urgently requested that any accidental omission of a name, any mistake in the spelling of a name, or any mistake in rank or description may be notified”

The Cookham Dean war memorial was back on track.

The Vicar’s Letter

The efforts made (thanks especially to Sir R. M. Beachcroft, Chairman) to raise further subscriptions for the War Memorial have been rewarded with great success. The amount now in hand and promised will justify the signing of the contract for its erection as soon as arrangements for that purpose can be made. By request of the Committee a list of the names to be inscribed upon the panels is being issued with this month’s Magazine. And it is urgently requested that any accidental omission of a name, any mistake in the spelling of a name, or any mistake in rank or description may be notified before Saturday, May 24th, to Mr. H. Edwards, Tars Pitt, Cookham Dean, Hon. Sec. to the Committee. The Committee after this notice will not hold themselves responsible for any omission or mistake, for when once the list is finally made up, it will be too late to alter it.

Cookham Dean parish magazine, May 1919 (D/P43B/28A/11)

“Fires wouldn’t burn”

Continuing fuel shortages were exacerbated by exceptionally cold weather the spring after the war.

11/02/19
Temperature 36* at 9.45 am – fires wouldn’t burn – marching, running, dancing etc taken til 10.am

Log book of Leckhampstead School (C/EL 51/2)

Special lessons on “The Empire” and “Patriotism”

The war continued to inform Empire Day celebrations in Berkshire schools.

Slough
May 23rd 1919

Celebration of Empire Day.

Empire lessons were given throughout the school.

A hollow square was formed in the playground and the flag was hoisted while the National Anthem was being sung.

The Chairman Mr Andrews, the Revd Theo Cousens and Mr Frank Smith addressed the children, the subject being the Empire and its builders.

Patriotic Songs were sung and the school was dismissed for a half holiday.

St Peter’s CE School, Earley
23rd May 1919

This being Empire Day, the ordinary timetable lessons were not taken, but special lessons on “The Empire” and “Patriotism” were given throughout the school, and at 11 a.m. the whole of the children were assembled around the school flagpole, and the vicar raised the Union jack amid great cheering from the scholars & the assembled parents and parishioners. Canon Fowler, Mr R Lea & Miss Weldon made patriotic speeches, & the children sang some appropriate songs.

In the afternoon the usual May Day Festival was held at 3 p.m….

At the close of the proceedings, a collection, amounting to £3.1.5 was made, the money to go towards an “Honour” board for Earley school-boys who have fallen in the war.

Ascot Heath Boys’ School
May 23rd 1919

Empire Day was celebrated at 2.30 p.m. in the presence of many parents and Friends. Sir Neville Chamberlain R.C.B. addressed the Children on the “Meaning of Empire” and “Our Duty Towards It”.

Ascot Heath Girls School
23rd May 1919

The children assembled in the Boys field and were addressed by Sir Neville Chamberlain.

Priestwood
23/05/1919

Special lessons have been given this week to prepare for Empire Day. This morning at 11.30 and this afternoon at 3pm parade, demonstration consisting of appropriate songs renditions took place in the playground.

Reading Christ Church CE Infants School
23rd May 1919

Tomorrow (Saturday) being Empire Day, the National Anthem was sung this morning, and the flag saluted by all the children, who listened to an interesting address by Captain Wing. The lessons during the morning were on Empire Day.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1); St Peter’s CE School, Earley: log book (SCH36/8/3); Ascot Heath Boys’ School log book (C/EL110/4); Ascot Heath Girls School log book (C/EL109/2); Priestwood Council Infant School (C/EL70); Reading Christ Church CE Infants School log book (89/SCH/7/6)

All will gather together for the singing of ‘Land of our Birth’

22/05/19

Lessons bearing on the Empire will be given today in connection with the celebration of Empire Day. At the close of school all will gather together for the singing of ‘Land of our Birth’ and the national anthem. As arranged by the education committee tomorrow afternoon will be a holiday.

Log book of Joseph Henry Wilson School, Newbury (N/ES7/1)