Special lessons on “The Empire” and “Patriotism”

The war continued to inform Empire Day celebrations in Berkshire schools.

Slough
May 23rd 1919

Celebration of Empire Day.

Empire lessons were given throughout the school.

A hollow square was formed in the playground and the flag was hoisted while the National Anthem was being sung.

The Chairman Mr Andrews, the Revd Theo Cousens and Mr Frank Smith addressed the children, the subject being the Empire and its builders.

Patriotic Songs were sung and the school was dismissed for a half holiday.

St Peter’s CE School, Earley
23rd May 1919

This being Empire Day, the ordinary timetable lessons were not taken, but special lessons on “The Empire” and “Patriotism” were given throughout the school, and at 11 a.m. the whole of the children were assembled around the school flagpole, and the vicar raised the Union jack amid great cheering from the scholars & the assembled parents and parishioners. Canon Fowler, Mr R Lea & Miss Weldon made patriotic speeches, & the children sang some appropriate songs.

In the afternoon the usual May Day Festival was held at 3 p.m….

At the close of the proceedings, a collection, amounting to £3.1.5 was made, the money to go towards an “Honour” board for Earley school-boys who have fallen in the war.

Ascot Heath Boys’ School
May 23rd 1919

Empire Day was celebrated at 2.30 p.m. in the presence of many parents and Friends. Sir Neville Chamberlain R.C.B. addressed the Children on the “Meaning of Empire” and “Our Duty Towards It”.

Ascot Heath Girls School
23rd May 1919

The children assembled in the Boys field and were addressed by Sir Neville Chamberlain.

Priestwood
23/05/1919

Special lessons have been given this week to prepare for Empire Day. This morning at 11.30 and this afternoon at 3pm parade, demonstration consisting of appropriate songs renditions took place in the playground.

Reading Christ Church CE Infants School
23rd May 1919

Tomorrow (Saturday) being Empire Day, the National Anthem was sung this morning, and the flag saluted by all the children, who listened to an interesting address by Captain Wing. The lessons during the morning were on Empire Day.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1); St Peter’s CE School, Earley: log book (SCH36/8/3); Ascot Heath Boys’ School log book (C/EL110/4); Ascot Heath Girls School log book (C/EL109/2); Priestwood Council Infant School (C/EL70); Reading Christ Church CE Infants School log book (89/SCH/7/6)

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Numbers so low, and sickness so rife

Influenza was taking its toll, and many schools would miss out on celebrating the armistice as a result.

Sonning
4th November 1918

On Monday 4th November only 22 boys presented themselves at school. I informed the Correspondent (Rev G.S Crawford) and he communicated with the B.E.C. The Secretary of the B.E.C acting on the advice of the school Medical Officer advised the closing of the school until Nov 18th.

Braywick
4th November 1918

School re-assembled as usual this morning but as the numbers were so low, and sickness so rife Dr Patterson ordered the school to close for a week longer.

Upton
4. XI.18

Henry Roberts and Francis Webb had their marks cancelled during the morning as they appeared to be suffering from influenza.

Milton
Nov 4th

I, Alice Andrews, take up my duties here as Head Mistress.
Owing to Influenza only 30 children assembled – sent for the Rector who advised me to wire to Reading – dismissed children to await instructions.

Boyne Hill
Nov: 4th

School reopened at 9 am with 172 present out of 201. The MOH has been notified.
The building has been thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.
Children have again been dismissed until Nov: 11th.

Log books of Sonning Boys school (89/SCH/1/2); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); Upton CE School (C/EL48/2); Milton CE School (D/P85/25/25); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3);

Three sons, all engaged in the war

BROTHERHOOD NOTES

We desire to express our deep sympathy with Brother Andrews in his sorrow. Brother Andrews had three sons, and they were all engaged in the war. The eldest has been killed in action, the second was drowned in the Lismore Castle, and the third is reported “missing”.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, July 1918 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Progressing favourably in Egypt

Ascot churchgoers continued to think of their men in the services.

On Wednesdays there will be an address after Evensong and War Intercessions at 7.30 and also on Fridays at 11, after the Litany.

The following have written thanking the Men’s Committee for Christmas parcels safely received :–

M. Sumner, W. Roots, F. Swayne, R. Sensier, F. May, J. Nobbs, J. Siggins, J. Williams, S. Waite, E. Butler, G. Larkin, G. Andrews, A Barnard, F. Barton, H. Wilderspin, C. Berridge, G. White, E. Dunstan, G. Talbot, W. Jones.

We are very glad to hear that Fred Talbot, who was reported dangerously wounded, is now reported progressing favourably in Egypt.

The collection at Evensong on Christmas afternoon when carols were sung, amounted to £2 10s. 0d. fot St Dunstan’s Hospital for Blinded Soldiers.

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, February 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10)

The need for eggs is greater than ever

So many people kept chickens that the gift of eggs to hospitals for the wounded was an obvious patriotic offering. Some people had more to give away than others. Three ladies in Early had donated over 1000 eggs each over a two year period.

NATIONAL EGG COLLECTION

Eggs are collected every Thursday at the School, for the sick and wounded. During the two years ending in May, over 9,000 have been given by the residents of Earley.

Our chief contributors are: Mrs Hissey, 1,200; Miss Montizambert, 1139; Mrs Bastow, 1,041; Mr G Hatch, 971; Mr J Lewington, 777; Mrs W Hatch, 733; Mrs P Davis, 630; Mrs Wooridge, 421; Mrs Dance, 389; Mrs Dunlop, 262; Mr F Johnson, 260; Mr Culham, 246; Mrs Hallaway, 218; Mrs G Webb, 205; Misses Beauchamp, 150; Mrs W Nash, 124; Mrs Andrews, 100.

Among those who have given less than 100 are, Mrs G Cane, Mrs Cottrell, Mrs Hutt, Mrs H King, Miss Lea, Miss Liddiard, Miss Nickes, Mrs Prior, Mrs Shotton, Mrs Slaughter, Mrs Whitworth.

The Collector for this district is Mrs de Bathe, of Hartley Court, and she writes to say how very grateful the people at the hospitals are for the eggs, and that the need for them is greater than ever. There is to be a Flag Day on July 14th when Mrs de Bathe hopes there will be a good response especially from this district.

Earley St Peter parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P191/28A/24)

A splendid address on Duty and Patriotism that even the tiniest could understand

Empire Day was the focus for patriotic expressions in schools across the county.

Piggott Schools, Wargrave
Empire Day

The children of the Piggott Schools celebrated Empire Day (May 24th) in right loyal fashion. They assembled at the School, and with flags flying, marched down to Church where a short service was held. The Vicar gave an appropriate address. Re-assembling on the Church Green they proceeded to the Schools and took their places round the flag pole from which the Union Jack was flying. A good number of parents and friends of the children with many of the soldiers from the hospital were waiting their return. As the boys passed the soldiers they gave them a salute in recognition of what they had done for their country.

The National Anthem was sung, and the flag saluted, and Miss. E. Sinclair gave a splendid address on Duty and Patriotism in such a way that even the tiniest could understand it. Capt. Bird proposed a vote of thanks to Miss Sinclair and hearty cheers were given in which the soldiers joined. Three Patriotic and Empire Songs were sung by the children, the Vicar called for cheers for the Teachers, and Mr. Coleby announced that Mrs. Cain had most kindly provided buns and sweets for all as they left the grounds. Hearty cheers were given her for her thoughtfulness. Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

Alwyn Road School, Cookham
May 24th 1917

Empire Day was celebrated today. The Headmaster addressed the children assembled in the Hall, and the National Anthem was sung. The children then went to their classrooms and ordinary lessons proceeded till 11 o’clock. Each class teacher then gave a lesson on “Empire” and kindred subjects till 11.30. This was followed by a Writing Lesson when some of the important facts were taken down.

The school assembled in the Hall again at 11.55 and after a few more remarks by the Headmaster the national Anthem was again sung and the children dismissed.

Opportunity was taken of this morning’s addresses to instil into the children’s minds the necessity of economising in the use of all food stuffs, and more especially of bread and flour.

A holiday was granted in the afternoon. (more…)

Pray for the good hand of God upon us in the war

More Earley men had joined up, while churchgoers across the county were urged to pray for army chaplains.

THE BISHOP’S MESSAGE
The following extracts are from the Bishop’s message in the October Diocesan magazine:
Your prayers are specially asked

For the National Mission….
For the good hand of God upon us in the war.
For the chaplains to the forces, especially those from this diocese.
For the wounded in hospital, especially those in this diocese, and those who minister to them…
For the supply of candidates for Holy orders, especially from among those now serving as soldiers.

LIST OF MEN SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES

The following additional names have been added to our prayer list:

William Waite, William Wright, Harry Cartwright, James Maxwell, Edwin Jerome, Harold White, Lionel Dunlop, Brian Dunlop, William Illsley, Albert Flower, Tom Brooks, Harry Shepherd, Albert Andrews, Robert Lewis, Harry Longshaw, Horace Gilbert, George Stacey, Maurice Love.

In addition to those already mentioned we especially commend the following to your prayers:

Killed: Alfred Bolton, Percy Howlett, Ralph Hayes Sadler.
Died: Harry Stevens.
Wounded: Jack Howlett, Percy Hamilton, George Bungay, Sidney Saunders, Leonard Rixon, Frank Jones.
Sick: William Fisher, Sidney Farmer.

Earley parish magazine, October 1916 (D/P191/28A/31/10)

Blinded soldiers turn to chicken rearing

Berkshire County Council and its committees dealt with several war related matters. One was the registration of the multitude of independent war charities which had sprung up.

Report of School Management Sub-committee, 14 October 1916

HEAD TEACHERS AND MILITARY SERVICE

The following Head Teachers have rejoined the Army since the last meeting: Mr Mills (Childrey), Mr Hunt (Cold Ash), Mr Bird (Priestwood), Mr Andrews (Mortimer St Mary’s) and Mr Verrall (Brimpton). Their places have been filled temporarily by the appointment of the Certificated Assistant (Woman) of their respective schools, or by the transfer of a teacher from another school.

Report of Smallholdings and Allotments Committee, 14 October 1916

COTTAGES AND LAND FOR BLINDED SOLDIERS, &C, FOR POULTRY FARMING

Enquiries were made on behalf of the Blinded Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Hostel, St Dunstan’s, as to whether any assistance could be given in finding locations near Reading for Blinded Soldiers who have been taught chicken rearing. They require a cottage and about an acre of ground at a rent not exceeding £30 per annum.

The agents in the Reading district were asked if they had any suitable properties available, but from the replies received it appeared that no suitable places were available for renting, and only three or four were put forward for sale.

It was stated by St Dunstan’s that at present only leasing could be considered.

Report of the War Charities Committee, 14 October 1916

The following applications for registration under the War Charities Act, 1916, have not been approved, and the Clerk instructed to issue certificates and to notify the Charity Commissioners: (more…)

Twenty African clergy and teachers are said to have died of hardships in German prisons

The vicar of Reading St Giles was worried about the fate of British missionaries, and local converts, in German-controlled parts of Africa.

NOTES FROM THE VICAR

Zanzibar Diocese

When war broke out in 1914, 42 missionaries of the Zanzibar Diocese were at work in German East Africa, and hardly any direct news of them has since been received. Twenty African clergy and teachers are said to have died of hardships in German prisons. It adds to our anxieties to know that a great number of our African Christians are unshepherded and deprived of the sacraments. Now that a determined attempt is being made to take this, the last remaining colony of the Germans, the dangers and difficulties of our 19 Englishmen and 22 Ladies may be greater than ever.

Nyasaland Diocese

The war has debarred our missionaries from continuing their work on the north-east shores of Lake Nyasa, and the Diocese also is inconvenienced through the commandeering by the British Government of the Mission steamers “Chauncy Maples” and “Charles Jansen.”

To be added to our Intercessions List:

Private Albert Henry Oliver, R.M.A., Lieut. Commander C.J. Benton, R.N.R., Driver J. Cutter, R.E., Sergt. J. Burridge, A.O.C. Bombadier H. Burridge, R.G.A. Gunner G. Moss, R.G.A. Private W. Burridge, Scots. Fusiliers. H. Case, R.G.A.

Missing: Private A. Smith. Wounded: Private S.H.Truss. Private J. Wiltshire. Lieut. G.R. Goodship.

To the list of the departed: Private Sadler, T.J. Seymour, Hyde (R.Berks), E.J.Andrews, Criddle (A.S.C.), Capt. R. Attride (R.Berks).

Reading St Giles parish magazine, September 1916 (D/P191/28A/24)

“It is right to relieve the tradesmen and cottagers from the further burden of supporting the Refugees”

The generous people of Ascot were to cut down on their support of Belgian refugees.

OUR BELGIAN REFUGEES.

For the last 15 months the tradesmen and cottagers have most generously supported a Belgian Refugee Family at Easton Villa, Kennel Ride. The numbers have varied from two to ten, and in all we have had twelve members of one family. Some have now returned to their own country, and some have gone to work in London or elsewhere – so that at present there are one man and his wife and their small nephew to claim our hospitality.

The large sum of nearly £100 has been raised by weekly subscriptions, varying from one penny to one shilling: and it is thought that as prices are rising, and the Government is asking for all our savings, it is right to relieve the tradesmen and cottagers from the further burden of supporting the Refugees. All District Visitors are therefore asked not to collect in their Districts: but small contributions will still be gratefully accepted.

Signed,- E.M.Elliot, A. Andrews, L. Hullcoop, W.J. Bishop, A. Lissman, H. Woods.

Receipts.
November, 1914, to December, 1915 … £98 6 1

Expenditure.
November, 1914, to December, 1915-
Rent … … … … £21 0 0
Coals… … … … 6 6 0
Money given … … … 61 0 0
_____________
£98 6 0
_____________

Ascot section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2

No books owing to the war

A prize day at a Slough school saw a quieter occasion than usual – and no real prizes for the pupils. Meanwhile, an Aldermaston teacher got a day off to see her soldier brother, home on leave.

Stoke Road School, Slough
November 22nd 1915

Annual Prize Distribution.

The following managers were present:- Mr Daw (Chairman) and the Revd Theo Cousens. The Revd PH Eliot, Mr McCormack and Mr Andrews signified their inability to attend. Mrs Allhusen was in France.

Mrs Cousens kindly distributed the certificates. The pupils were briefly addressed by the Chairmen and Mrs Cousens.

Mr Greenway R.A.M.C was present.

There were no book prizes owing to the War, certificates of merit being issued instead.

Aldermaston School
22nd November 1915

Miss Adams has been granted a leave of absence for today as her brother has returned from the trenches in France for a few days.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1, p. 379); Aldermaston School log book (88/SCH3/3, p. 45)

“Butcher’s meat has to go”

Two more Cranbourne men had fallen in the war, while others had followed them to the front. Meanwhile those left behind were sending eggs for the wounded, and taking the advice of an almost certainly fictional letter in the church magazine to save food and money.

We have to record, with much regret, the deaths of Sergeant Tom Hillyer, and Private James Andrews.

Sergeant Hillyer was killed in action in April. He was well known in the Parish as a Postman and as the winner of several prizes for walking at the Sports of the Windsor Forest Athletic Club. When the war began he at once enlisted in the Canadian contingent and was very soon promoted to be sergeant. He had seen service in the Egyptian campaigns and in the South African War, and held four medals.

James Andrews was gardener at Springhill and being reservist had to join his regiment at once. After eight months fighting he was seriously wounded and died of his wounds early in May. He was a much respected member of our branch of the C.E.M.S. and a regular communicant. Memorial services were held in our Church for both of these soldiers who died for their King and Country.

The following names are to be added to the list (published last month) of those who are serving in His Majesty’s forces.

Charles Goodchild, Suffolk Regiment.
Charles Peters, Lance-Corporal, Mechanical Transport.
Ernest Hawthorne, Royal Engineers.
Arthur Robert Hatcher, Royal Engineers.
Frank Edmonds, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.
Albert John Edmonds, Berkshire Yeomanry.

Several in this Parish are contributing to the egg collection which is being made all over the country for our wounded soldiers. Miss K. Meyer is the local Secretary and takes the gifts each week to Windsor, where they are packed and sent to headquarters in London, from which place they are sent to our hospitals in England and France. Since April 30th, 1485 eggs have been given by residents in Cranbourne and Winkfield, but during the last month the number sent each week has been getting less. The Secretary wishes it to be known that even one egg a week, or one a fortnight will be gratefully received, for “every mickle makes a muckle.” She would be glad to receive the eggs on Thursdays, as she takes them to Windsor every Friday.

We have seen an interesting letter and as it seemed to contain some most valuable information, we have persuaded the writer to let us publish it in our Magazine. It is too long to print the whole of it in this month’s issue and so it will be “continued in our next.”-

MRS. SMITH TO MRS. ROBINSON.

“DEAR MRS. ROBINSON,”

This comes hoping you are well, as it leaves me at present, but terribly worried over this cruel war. It’s hard enough to get on now that work is plenty. What will it be when the war is over and hundreds of thousands of soldiers come back to work and take the situations which are being kept open for them. And the bill there will be to pay. The Parliament is spending 3 millions of pounds every day on the war, and you don’t suppose they are finding the money in their cellars where Guy Faux was hid. No, my husband says they are running up a big debt, and who do you suppose will pay it, he says. Why, he says, it is us the working people will have to pay it, at least it will come hardest on us. So those who are making a little more just now (which is not you or me) should be saving every penny beyond their bare living, and not fancying themselves rich.

It is a mercy I learned to make the most of things, and I may mention some of the things I am doing now. First of all, butcher’s meat has to go. No bits of steak and one-and-five per lb. Even the gentry are not buying such a lot of butcher’s meat just now, so that there may be more to go round for the poorer classes. Any meat I can buy must not be choice parts. If it is nicely stewed any part can be made good, especially just now, with vegetables not so hard to get. Onions one must have. They are most wholesome and they make anything go down. Brown a bit of onion in a saucepan with a bit of dripping and a good dust of flour. When it is all brown, add a little water and stir till it boils, and makes a thin sauce. Drop in the meat and a tea spoon of vinegar, also a little pepper. Cook it slowly till the meat is soft. You can keep putting in any bits of vegetables, also potato. When you dish it up, you get back everything you have put in- no waste. Of course the pot must be filled up with more water if the meat is getting too dry.

As for potatoes, I should feel ashamed of myself if I was to peel them. The Irish, who know what potatoes are, think the skin of a baked potato the best part. Any way, if boiled in their skins you get much more flavour, and can strip off the skins as you eat them. Peeling them in the old way wastes one pound in every four pounds. It is wise to buy what potatoes you can, as they are good food, except for babies, and make other things go further. If I ever run to a rasher, I fry some cold potato with it, as a saving, and as for ‘sausages and mashed,’ the potato is half the battle.

Sausages are a help just now. Put them in a pie dish and over them a batter made with flour, milk, and water, and one egg, and they go a long way as ‘toad in the hole’; or put them in the dish, covered with potatoes and bake like a pie. If only plainly fried they are too dear. Fish, when you can get it, will save the meat. Plaice, haddock, cod or hake can be made quite tasty. Put on a tin, and sprinkle with vinegar, pepper and salt; cover it with a bit of clean paper and put a bit of dripping round. Bake it till it is ready to leave the bone. Baste it through the paper whenever you have time. Serve it with the liquor which runs out, which is quite tasty.”

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

Cranbourne men in the forces

The men of Cranbourne were serving in a variety of regiments.

The following is a list of those who are serving in His Majesty’s Forces and who have their homes in Cranbourne.

Andrews, James, Hampshire Regiment
Brant, Ernest Harold, Royal Berks
Brant, Albert, Royal Berks
Beasley, William, Royal Berks
Bish, Walter George, Army Service Corps
Barker, Harry, Royal Navy
Boyde, Albert Ernest, Remount Department
Boyde, Edward Jospeh, Royal Navy
Barrett, Archibald Richard, Army Ordnance Corps
Bowyer, Charles John, (Lance-Corporal) 15th Hussars
Clarke, Wilfred Lawson (2nd Lieut.) Royal Berks
Cox, Amariah, Royal Berks
Cox, Albert, Royal Berks
Creasy, Robert Leonard (2nd Lieut.), Royal Field Artillery
Evans, Reginald, Royal Engineers
Grout, George, Royal Artillery
Greenough, Edward, Royal Engineers
Herridge, John, Royal Engineers
Herridge, William, Royal Engineers
Higgs, Herbert, Army Service Corps
Hillyer, Tom (Sergt), Canadian Contingent
Harwood, Frederick, 12th Lancers
Hawes, William, Army Service Corps
Haig, John (Major), Westminster Dragoons
Hatch, John, Royal Berks
Harris, Theodore William, Royal Berks
Harris, Frederick, Royal Engineers
Mapp, Ernest, Royal Berks
Keen, Ernest, Royal Veterinary Corps
King, Edward James, Royal Navy
Jones, Frank, Royal Berks
Needham, Evelyn Jack (Lieut.), Northamptonshire Regiment
Needham, Robert Phillip (2nd Lieut.), Northamptonshire Regiment
Pither, Robert James, Enniskillen Dragoons
Pither, John Arthur, Royal Berks
Platt, Charles Frederick (Lance-Corporal), Royal Berks
Platt, Edwin, Royal Engineers
Phillips, Jeoffrey Francis (Captain), Duke of Cornwalls Light Infantry
Prior, Tom, Royal Berks
Sarney, Albert Edward, Royal Navy
Sarney, Francis, Grenadier Guards
Smith, Sidney Alfred, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry
Taylor, Archibald Henry, Motor Maxim-gun Service
Taylor, Stanley Ernest, Royal Field Artillery
Taylor, Richard Charles, Royal Field Artillery
Ward, Theodore Alfred, Royal Berks
Williams, Richard Freke Maxwell, Royal Naval Brigade
Weston, George, London Regiment
Wath, William, 11th Hussars
Yeo, William, Royal Engineers

With much regret we hear that Private James Andrews has been wounded. He is a member of our branch of the C.E.M.S., and his brother members will doubtless remember him in their prayers. We also hear that Privates C.J. Bowyer, E. Mapp, A. Brant, and W. Yeo have been ill in hospital, and Lieut. W.L. Clarke, whom we congratulate on his appointment to commission, has been unwell, but we are glad to say they are all better.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1915 (D/P151/28A/17/6)

Schools taken over as war hospitals

Several Reading schools found themselves evicted due to the need of premises for nursing wounded troops. Battle Infants’ School in Reading was one of those taken over for use as a military hospital:

5th February 1915 

Notice has been received that the school building is required for use as a military hospital; the children were therefore dismissed this (Friday) morning for the day, at 11.30, and the staff spent the afternoon preparing for the removal of the furniture and apparatus to Elm Park Hall where the children are to be accommodated.

Elm Park Hall was a local Methodist church, but other schools ended up sharing with other schools on a timeshare basis, with one set of children getting lessons in the mornings, the others in the afternoons. Reading Central School had to move in with George Palmer Boys’ School:

5th February 1915
To-day Mr Andrews called to arrange for the holding of the Central School on these premises from Tuesday Feb 9th onwards, the Central Buildings for the time being being used as a Hospital by the authorities at the War Office.

Katesgrove School for Girls in Reading was also affected.

5 February 1915

Closed the school at 11.30am for purposes of stocktaking and to prepare for removal to George Palmer School.

Battle Infants School log book (SCH20/8/2, p. 254); George Palmer Boys’ School log book (89/SCH/8/1, p. 125); Katesgrove Girls School log book (SCH/6/8/2, p. 412)

Much needed gifts for the Belgians via Harrods

People from Cranbourne and Chavey Down were generous in their gifts for our Belgian allies.

Chavey Down

The working party at Chavey Down have forwarded a nice parcel of very well made children’s clothes to the Belgian Refugees at Folkestone, where they are very much needed.

Cranbourne

The HARVEST THANKSGIVING SERVICES were held on October 5th. Only the East end and the Font were decorated with flowers. The real decorations of the Church were gifts from the congregation for the distressed in Belgium. A really remarkable response was made to the appeal for these gifts. Nine cases (kindly given by Mr. Laird) were delivered to Messrs. Harrods for shipment to Belgium. The driver of the van said “I am going back to London with almost as much as I started with.”

* * *

The following are the names of those from this Parish who are serving in His Majesty’s Forces:

Creasy G., Midshipman H. M. S. Conqueror.
Creasy, R., 2nd Lieut. R. F. A.
Haig, J., Major, Westminster Dragoons.
Needham, E. J., Lieut, Northamptonshire Regiment.
Needham, R. P., 2nd Lieut, Northamptonshire Regiment.
Phillips, E. H., D. S. O, Major R. F. A.
Phillips, R. N., Captain, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.
Phillips, G. F., Captain, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry.
Andrews, James, Hampshire Regiment.
Barratt, Archibald Richard, National Reserve.
Beasley, T.
Brant, Ernest Harold.
Bish, Walter George, Army Service Corps.
Boyde, Albert Ernest, Army Service Corps.
Boyde, Edward Joseph, Royal Navy.
Clarke, Wilfred Lawson, Royal Berks Regiment.
Cox, Amariah, Royal Berks Regiment.
Curtis, Eric, Seaforth Highlanders.
George, William, Royal Artillery.
Goodchild, Charles.
Greenough, Edward, Royal Engineers.
Herridge, John, Royal Engineers.
Herridge, William, Royal Engineers.
Harwood, Frederick, 12th Lancers.
Higgs, Herbert, Army Service Corps.
Holliday, Walter George, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
Harriss, Theodore William, Royal Berks Regiment.
Harriss, Frederick, Royal Engineers.
Hawthorn, George Albert, Royal Naval Flying Corps.
Hillyer, Tom, Canadian Contingent.
Mapp, Ernest, Royal Berks Regiment.
Pither, J. A., Royal Berks Regiment.
Pither, J., Enniskillen Dragoons.
Sarney, Albert Edward, Royal Navy.
Sarney, Francis, Grenadier Guards.
Searle, George, 2nd Life Guards.
Walls, Charles John, Royal Berks Regiment.
Walls, Leslie, Royal Berks Regiment.
Williams, R. F. Maxwell, Royal Naval Brigade.
Ward, Theodore Alfred, Royal Berks Regiment.
Weston, George.

* * *

C. E. M. S.
The annual business meeting was held on October 14th. After the Election of Officers and other business them embers and a few friends were shown some lantern slides illustrating the war in Belgium.

Chavey Down and Cranbourne sections of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/11)