The best results are obtained only by getting into touch with the men personally

Thousands of wounded or sick troops had now returned home. the nation owed them support for their service. Some needed medical help, others re-training for new occupations, or help finding jobs.

The Disablements Sub-committee beg to report that they have been notified of approximately 2,524 disabled soldiers and sailors discharged into the county. Of the cases now entered upon the Register, which exclude those being investigated, the numbers specifying disabilities are as follows:

Amputation of leg or foot 51
Amputation of arm or hand 34
Other wounds or injuries to leg or foot 353
Other wounds or injuries to arm or hand 147
Other wounds or injuries to head 69
Other wounds or injuries 192
Blindness and other eye affections 77
Heart diseases 217
Chest complaints 93
Tuberculosis 101
Deafness and affections of the ear 72
Rheumatism 151
Epilepsy 37
Neurasthenia 47
Other mental affections 31
Other disabilities 532

Of this number all have been provided with a Medical Attendant [i.e. a doctor] under the National Health Insurance Act, and special treatment, including the supply or repair of artificial limbs and surgical appliances, has been provided in accordance with the recommendations of Military Authorities, Medical Boards or ordinary medical Attendants.

From the 1 April 1917, 280 cases have received Institutional treatment – both in and out-patient – at Military Hospitals, Civil Hospitals, Sanatoria, Cottage Hospitals or Convalescent Homes.
The total number of tuberculous soldiers and sailors to date is 101, and of these 72 have received Institutional treatment within the County under the County Scheme and three have received Institutional treatment outside the County Scheme. This treatment is provided through the County Insurance Committee.

The Committee has assisted with Buckinghamshire War Pensions Committee in the provision of a new wing for Orthopaedic Treatment at the King Edward VII Hospital, Windsor. This, which was urgently needed, and will be of the greatest benefit to men in that part of the county, will be opened in the course of two or three weeks. The Committee has also been instrumental with the Buckinghamshire Committee in obtaining the approval of the Minister of Pensions to a proposed Scheme for the provision, equipment, and establishment of a special hospital for totally disabled soldiers and sailors at Slough and an assurance from the Ministry of adequate fees for maintenance thereof. Her Royal Highness Princess Alice is forming a provisional Committee, and we have every hope that the proposed arrangements will e speedily carried into effect.
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Carrying on under exceptional circumstances

A Slough soldier came to visit his old school while home on leave.

July 30th 1917

Lieutenant Henry Chilverd R.F.A came to the school today. He was promoted to Sec[ond] Lieutenant in the regular army eighteen months ago for ‘carrying on’ with his battery under exceptional circumstances.

He had been in the army before the war and also served in the North West – Canada. His younger brother was the first of our old boys to be killed in this war.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1, p. 399)

Plans for air raids

Small children in Reading practised their air raid drill.

Battle Infants School, Reading
20th July 1917

Instructions have been received that a plan of action is to be arranged in case of an “air raid”. A drill for this was practised on Thursday.

Grey Friars Infants’ School, Reading
July 20th 1917

‘Air Raid’ Drill practised this morning according to scheme prepared.

Stoke Road School, Slough
July 20th 1917
An old boy of the school called this week having been promoted on the field to Second Lieutenant in the Canadians – 2nd Lieutenant D Oldham.

Battle Infants School log book (SCH20/8/2); Grey Friars Infants’ School log book (R/ES4/2); Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1)

Returning to France today

Slough and Chalvey British Infants’ School
June 4th 1917
Mrs Stewart is absent today as her husband is returning to France after leave.

Wokingham Wescott Road School
June 4th 1917

A memorial service for Mr Vickers was held at All Saints Church this afternoon at 4pm. It was specially arranged for the scholars, and 230 attended.

Slough and Chalvey British Infants’ School log book (C/EL123, p. 342); Wokingham Wescott Road School log book (C/EL87, p. 175)

A splendid address on Duty and Patriotism that even the tiniest could understand

Empire Day was the focus for patriotic expressions in schools across the county.

Piggott Schools, Wargrave
Empire Day

The children of the Piggott Schools celebrated Empire Day (May 24th) in right loyal fashion. They assembled at the School, and with flags flying, marched down to Church where a short service was held. The Vicar gave an appropriate address. Re-assembling on the Church Green they proceeded to the Schools and took their places round the flag pole from which the Union Jack was flying. A good number of parents and friends of the children with many of the soldiers from the hospital were waiting their return. As the boys passed the soldiers they gave them a salute in recognition of what they had done for their country.

The National Anthem was sung, and the flag saluted, and Miss. E. Sinclair gave a splendid address on Duty and Patriotism in such a way that even the tiniest could understand it. Capt. Bird proposed a vote of thanks to Miss Sinclair and hearty cheers were given in which the soldiers joined. Three Patriotic and Empire Songs were sung by the children, the Vicar called for cheers for the Teachers, and Mr. Coleby announced that Mrs. Cain had most kindly provided buns and sweets for all as they left the grounds. Hearty cheers were given her for her thoughtfulness. Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

Alwyn Road School, Cookham
May 24th 1917

Empire Day was celebrated today. The Headmaster addressed the children assembled in the Hall, and the National Anthem was sung. The children then went to their classrooms and ordinary lessons proceeded till 11 o’clock. Each class teacher then gave a lesson on “Empire” and kindred subjects till 11.30. This was followed by a Writing Lesson when some of the important facts were taken down.

The school assembled in the Hall again at 11.55 and after a few more remarks by the Headmaster the national Anthem was again sung and the children dismissed.

Opportunity was taken of this morning’s addresses to instil into the children’s minds the necessity of economising in the use of all food stuffs, and more especially of bread and flour.

A holiday was granted in the afternoon. (more…)

Manual work classes stopped

Boys at a Slough school had practical lessons stopped due to the war.

May 7th 1917
Mr Scott of the Woodwork Centre having ‘joined up’, no manual work classes are being held for the boys.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1, p. 395)

Decorating eggs for soldiers

Children in Slough had an Easter gift for wounded soldiers.

April 4th 1917
The children brought 40 new laid eggs as gifts for the wounded soldiers – they decorated the eggs this morning


Slough and Chalvey British Infants’ Schol log book (C/EL123, p. 339)

Not yet back after his discharge

A Slough school was waiting for a soldier teacher’s return.

November 1st 1916
Miss A Swearer commenced work on supply, Miss Dolby having been transferred to the Infant Dept. and Mr Buck not have re-commenced work after discharge from the Army.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1, p. 390)

Doing the repairs of a family of six

Berkshire children were supporting the war effort.


October 19th 1916

Lower Sandhurst Council School

To-day being “Our Day” Red Cross Fund, the School Red Cross Box was opened and found to contain £1 – 18 – 6. This amount was forwarded to the Local Organiser for inclusion in the Sandhurst Contribution.

This amount included, our ‘War Contribution’ has now reached the sum of nine pounds five shillings; and 1017 eggs have been sent to the National Egg Collection.’

Alwyn Road School
A collection was taken in school today on behalf of “Our Day” the British Red Cross and Order of St John.

Stoke Road School, Slough

A good many exhibits for the economy exhibition have been received from the parents of children attending this school. A noteworthy exhibit is a pair of boots repaired by a boy of sixteen whose father is in the Army. In a note his mother says he is doing the repairs of a family of six.

Wescott Road School, Wokingham

The Head Master left school at 3pm in order to attend the War Pensions Committee Meeting.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 377);
Cookham Alwyn Road School log book (88/SCH/18/1); Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1, p. 389); Wokingham Wescott Road School log book (C/EL87, p. 168)

Sore losses

There was painful news for some Maidenhead families.

OUR SOLDIERS.

We deeply regret to record the death of Duncan Wilson, who fell a victim to a bomb dropped from an enemy aeroplane at the Front on July 11th. He was employed at Horlick’s Malted Milk Factory in Slough before joining the ranks and spending his Sundays in Maidenhead was a regular worshipper at our Church. He was a young man of character and promise, and his death is a sore loss to his friends and family.

It is painful too, to hear that Arthur Hedges has been missing since the beginning of July, and that his friends have practically given up hope.

Robert Anderson, who a few months ago received his discharge at the expiration of his term, has been compelled by recent legislation to join up again. John Bolton is in France.

Alas! Since writing the above lines, information has been received of the death of another of our lads. Robert Harris, one of the most devoted members of our Institute, who confessed his faith in Christ by joining the Church about two years ago, was killed by a bomb on July 24th. He was the eldest son of Mr. William Harris, Builder, Holman Leaze, and before enlisting was engaged in the Argus Press Printing Works. He was a young man of most amiable disposition, and was very popular among his fellow members in the Institute. He would have reached his 20th birthday on August 7th.

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, August 1916 (D/N33/12/1/5)

For the sake of economy

A school in Slough shut not because its buildings were taken over for the war, but to save money:

30th-31st March 1916

Two days holiday that desks and apparatus may be removed to Upper School Buildings as, for the period of the War for the sake of economy, the infants will be taught there. I take charge of the [Touman Mosley] Infants School, at Slough, on April 3rd.
Rose Down.

Wraysbury Infants School log book (88/SCH/22/2)

Farewell to a friend

The head teacher of a school in Slough allowed a staff member time off to see a friend heading for the Front.

February 4th 1916

I allowed Mrs Dibben to leave at 10:30am this morning to bid farewell to a friend leaving for France.

Slough and Chalvey British Infants School log book (C/EL123)

No books owing to the war

A prize day at a Slough school saw a quieter occasion than usual – and no real prizes for the pupils. Meanwhile, an Aldermaston teacher got a day off to see her soldier brother, home on leave.

Stoke Road School, Slough
November 22nd 1915

Annual Prize Distribution.

The following managers were present:- Mr Daw (Chairman) and the Revd Theo Cousens. The Revd PH Eliot, Mr McCormack and Mr Andrews signified their inability to attend. Mrs Allhusen was in France.

Mrs Cousens kindly distributed the certificates. The pupils were briefly addressed by the Chairmen and Mrs Cousens.

Mr Greenway R.A.M.C was present.

There were no book prizes owing to the War, certificates of merit being issued instead.

Aldermaston School
22nd November 1915

Miss Adams has been granted a leave of absence for today as her brother has returned from the trenches in France for a few days.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1, p. 379); Aldermaston School log book (88/SCH3/3, p. 45)

A bombardier talks to Slough schoolboys

Schoolboys from Slough got a first hand account of life in the trenches. Bombardiers were non-commissioned officers in the artillery.

September 6th 1915
Bombardier Calmer on leave from the Front visited the school and talked to the Top Class boys.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1)

Belgians mow and reap the hay

As Warfield men went to war, Belgian refugees helped to take on some of the work at home.

C.E.M.S.

Mr. Hammond, Junr., Secretary of the Wokingham Federation, was the recipient of a silver tray from the members of the branches in the Federation, on the occasion of his marriage on June 12th, and also of his resignation as Secretary, has now got a commission in the New Army. His place has been taken, at any rate for the present, by Mr. C. Jones, Moor Cottage, Binfield. Warfield was represented at the Slough Conference of the C.E.M.S. by the Vicar (Branch President), Mr. Brockbank (Branch Secretary), and Mr. H. Parks (Delegate of the Branch). We were very sorry that our other Delegate, Sir William Herschel, was unavoidably prevented from attending.

Some of our own Branch have been very helpful in a practical way, coming in the evening to mow and reap the hay in the Churchyard. Our biggest thanks are due to Messrs. G. Higgs, G. Lewis, H. Parks, Probyn, and B. Peat, also to the other non-members, L. Bristow, Chaney, Dyer, J. Lewis, our Belgian Guests Messrs. Taes and van der Voorde, also to Mrs. Thackeray and Mrs. Parks for their assistance.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)