Furlough from duty in Italy

5th May 1919

Mrs Hewitt is absent, leave for some days being applied for during her husband’s furlough from duty in Italy.

George Palmer Boys’ School log book (89/SCH/8/1, p. 158)

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On leave from France

Would this soldier have to return now?

4/04/19

Mrs Smith has been absent from school – her husband on leave from France.

Log book of Joseph Henry Wilson School, Newbury (N/ES7/1)

Still several ill with Influenza

A teacher took some time off to be with her soldier husband. She returned on 21 March, but resigned on 2 May to follow her husband to Aldershot.

Earley
14th March 1919

Mrs Plumer has been away the past two days, as her husband is returning to his military duties next week.

Speenhamland
Mar 14th

This week the attendance has much improved, reaching 92.8%. There are still several ill with Influenza.

Log books of St Peter’s CE School, Earley (SCH36/8/3); St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

On military duties in Egypt and Palestine for four years

One demobilised soldier got a short break before resuming work.

12th March 1919

Mr Howard, who has been on military duties in Egypt and Palestine for four years, has now returned to England, has been granted leave of absence until Monday March 24th 1919 when he will recommence his duties here.

Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School log book (C/EL72/3, p. 204)

The return to Windsor, from the war, of the Coldstream Guards

Aston Tirrold
28th February 1919

There is much sickness (colds and influenza) in the school and for the week our percentage of attendance is only 60.

Windsor
1919
Feb: 28th

The Mayor visited on Thursday morning and gave the girls a holiday in the afternoon, because of the return to Windsor, from the war, of the Coldstream Guards.

East Hagbourne
Feby 28th

Mrs Marshall (S), whose husband is home on leave from France, is still absent.

Newbury
28/2/19

Student teacher Whitehorn has been absent from school this week owing to influenza

Earley
28 February 1919

Mrs Plumer, whose husband has just returned from India, & who is now in a Military Hospital in London, has been absent from her duties all this week.

Log books of Aston Tirrold CE School (C/EL105/1); Holy Trinity Infants School, Windsor (C/EL58/2); East Hagbourne School (C/EL35/2); Joseph Henry Wilson School, Newbury (N/ES7/1);
St Peter’s CE School, Earley (SCH36/8/3)

When the boys come home

One ex soldier was able to go back to his old job almost at once.

“WHEN THE BOYS COME HOME”

It has been splendid to welcome home half a dozen of our “boys” for their twelve days. … Will Ball’s “twelve days” have, we are delighted to know, been indefinitely extended. He has “come home” and we greet him warmly, and hope that in the coming happiness he may find an ample compensation for all that he has endured during his four years’ absence. The jobs he left in September 1914 are still open for him to re-enter.

Tilehurst Congregational Church section of Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, February 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

“He speaks well on the whole of his treatment in the prisoners’ camp”

Cigarettes were this year’s Christmas gift for Maidenhead soldiers.

OUR SOLDIERS.

A letter of Christmas greeting was again sent to each of our soldiers, and a packet of cigarettes to those who were overseas. We hope that in a very short time the majority of them will be back amongst us. Robert Bolton and Alfred Isaac have already been discharged. Reginald Hill was at home for Christmas leave, looking quite recovered after his long hospital experiences. Wallace Mattingley and George Ayres are in Germany.

We are glad to hear that 2nd Lieut Edgar Jones, son of Rev. G H. Jones, of Marlow, who, after a few days in France was taken prisoner about 17 months ago, returned home in time for Christmas. He speaks well on the whole of his treatment in the prisoners’ camp.

Maidenhead Congregational magazine, January 1919 (D/N33/12/1/5)

Home on final leave from the army

A headmaster’s son came home – and almost closed down the school.

14th January 1919
My eldest son just home on final leave from the army has developed measles. As he isolated the doctor thinks school may continue.

East Ilsley CE School log book (C/EL39/1, p. 489)

A husband home on leave

January 7th 1919
Mrs Blackwell absent from school for this week as her husband is home on leave.

Reading: Grey Friars Infants’ School log book (R/ES4/2, p. 357)

“The turmoils of War, I hope are over, and the dark War clouds rolled away to give place to a brighter and serene sky of peace and goodwill”

Datchet Working Men’s Club was delighted by the end of the war.

January 1919

The turmoils of War, I hope are over, and the dark War clouds rolled away to give place to a brighter and serene sky of peace and goodwill. Throughout all this indescribable tension, in which the sorrows of our heart have been enlarged beyond the powers of human voice to describe the members remaining who through force of circumstance were not allowed to rally to the colours, but who have helped in various ways to keep on high the flag of liberty and justice, have stuck to the club with laudable courage and have ever striven to welcome to the utmost those returning on the various leaves, or to alleviate in the highest degree the conditions of the wounded – or prisoners of War.

Moreover their desire has been to resuscitate it as Phoenix from its ashes the reviving has been beyond measure the heart is in good working order and there is a good tonic in reserve to keep it regular in its action.

We have lifted our eyes to the hills for help and our optimism has soared to great heights even altho pessimism has striven to keep it down.

This has given us immense courage and endurance.

We look forward to the return of the Boys with jubilation and we shall give them a rousing welcome when they do so.

But alas! For those, who are waiting for yet more glorious day than the signing of the Armistice or of the Peace we shall ever think of them as warriors faithful, true and bold, and laurels of beautiful thought will ever encircled our memory of them, no matter whither fate my lead us.

The permeating influence of our worthy President has at no time been felt more magnetising than during the past years and I am sure we even now rise up as it were and call him blessed his great benevolence to us.

May the time be far distant when his heaven on earth prefess a call!

The Vice Presidents have again guided their thoughts with swords for one defence and have followed one leader’s call to win the “land of promise” from the enemies of true social intercourse and fellowship.

Mr Langton has another year supplied us with the “Daily Graphic” and this kind thought has inspired us to think unselfishly and so help the “Brotherhood” so often preached about but little practised.

Datchet Working Men’s Club annual report (D/EX2481/1/5)

“The Buffs were smashed but our own line was intact”

Another of Sydney Spencer’s comrades made contact.

Hope Cottage
Baguley
Cheshire

23rd Decr 1918

Dear Mrs Image

I received your letter some days ago. As regards Sydney’s narrative I can add only a few particulars as I was hit the day the Boche attacked. I remember the strafe we got; Sydney had just relieved me and was in the front line when Johnny’s 27th Division attacked the Buffs on our right. The Buffs were smashed but our own line was intact. That evening (it was 6th Aug) we were told of the attack due on 8th, shortly afterwards I was hit and saw my last of Sydney and the others.

At present I am enjoying twelve days Xmas leave, and I hope that it will be my last leave. I expect to be discharged soon.

Thank you very much for your kind invitation. If ever I am in Cambridge I shall look you up.

You may rely on my doing my best to get any further information re Sydney that I can.

With best wishes for a Happy Xmas and New Year

I am
Yours sincerely

W I Dilworth

Letter of sympathy to Florence Image on the death of Sydney (D/EX801/81)

“Right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style”

This supplement to the roll of honour’s bald list of names gives us more detail about the parish’s fallen heroes.

Supplement to the Wargrave Parish Magazine

ROLL OF HONOUR.
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of thy compassion: We remember before thee our brethren who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness of all our sins, and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself to us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

Baker, Edward
Private, 7th Wiltshire Regiment, killed in action on the Salonica Front, April 24th, 1917, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker. He was born at Wargrave and educated at the Piggott School. When the war commenced he was working as a grocer’s assistant in Wargrave. He volunteered in 1915 and was sent out in 1916. He was killed by a shell in a night charge.

Barker, Percy William

Private, 7th Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment/ Killed at Salonica, July 4th 1917, aged 19. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. William Barker at Yeldall Lodge. His father was for twenty years a gardener at Yeldall. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the village school. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. He was one of the most helpful lads on the Boys’ Committee of the Boys’ Club. He volunteered May 11th, 1916. On July 4th, 1917, he was hit by a piece of shell from enemy aircraft while bathing and died within an hour. The Chaplain wrote to his parents “Your loss is shared by the whole battalion”.

Bennett, William
Sergeant, 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in France, Dec 3rd, 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bennett, of Wargrave, and when the war broke out he was working on a farm. He volunteered at once. He was killed instantly by a shell. One of his officers wrote: “Sergt. Bennett was the best N.C.O. we had in the company. Fearless, hardworking, willing, he was a constant inspiration to his platoon. His splendid record must inevitably have led to his decoration. We have lost an invaluable N.C.O. and a fine man. He was buried with all possible reverence about half a mile from Eaucourt L’Abbaye”.

Boyton, Bertram
Lieut., 6th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds in Palestine, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 36. He was educated at King’s College, London, and was a Surveyor and Architect by profession. He was a Fellow of the Surveyors Institute and had won Gold and Silver Medals of the Society of Auctioneers by examination. He was married to Elsie, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Morris, at the Parish Church, Wargrave, Sept. 7th 1905, He was a member of the London Rowing Club and the Henley Sailing Club, and keenly interested in all athletics. He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company in April 1915. He was given a commission in the 6th London R.F.A., in July 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant soon after. He went to France with his battery in June 1916, and to Salonica in the following November. He was sent to Egypt and Palestine in June 1917, and was wounded while taking his battery into action in an advance on November 6th. He died at El Arish on November 9th, 1917.

Buckett, Ernest Frederick

Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action Sept. 20th, 1917, in France, aged 23. The dearly loved husband of Dorothy May Buckett, married May 31st, 1917. He was educated at the Henley National School, and before the War was a slaughterman with Messrs. O’Hara & Lee, butchers, Henley and Wargrave. In 1910 he joined the Berkshire Yeomanry (Territorial Force), and was called up on August 4th, 1914, at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in the spring of 1915. When he had completed his five years service, since the date of his enlistment, he volunteered for another year, but received his discharge as a time-expired man in January 1916. In July, 1916, he was called up under the new regulations and sent immediately to France where he remained, except for leave on the occasion of his marriage, until he fell in action, September 20th, 1917. (more…)

Some return to school, some don’t

Flu was beginning to lessen – in some places.

Thatcham
Dec 2nd

Several of the children who have been away suffering from influenza have returned to school this morning.

Clewer
Dec. 2nd

Miss Green who was expected to commence duties today is unable to start owing to Influenza.

Reading
2/12/1918

Mrs Guppy will be absent from school for a fortnight in consequence of her husband being on leave. She has provided a substitute.


Log books of Thatcham CE School (C/EL53/4); St Katherine’s School, Clewer (C/EL113/2); Coley Street Primary School Reading (89/SCH/48/4)

Many still far from well

Christchurch School had been in the throes of an influenza outbreak for over a month already. The Earley teacher mentioned here did not return to work until 6 December.

Leckhampstead
22/11/18

Attendance this week has fallen from 27 out of 28 present on Monday to 17 present this morning – all absentees due to influenza colds. Secretary notified this morning – school closed.

Boyne Hill
Nov: 22nd

The percentage of attendance this week has been 76.5. Many of the children are still far from well, & in consequence the standard of work is very poor.

Christchurch, Reading
22nd November 1918

By order of the Medical Authority, school will be closed until November 25th.

Earley
22nd Nov 1918

Mrs Radbourne, whose husband is home on leave from France, has been absent all the week.

Log books of Leckhampstead School (C/EL 51/2); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3); Reading ChristChurch CE Infants School (89/SCH/7/6); St Peter’s CE School, Earley (SCH36/8/3)

People in London rather wild

It was understandable after four and a half years of war that some of those celebrating its end behaved badly.

19 November 1918

People in London rather wild. Burnt some of the German guns in bonfire.

Stayed in bed for Dr Moore. Said I could get up. Take it easy. Not go out yet.

Lt Knapman & Hay came about 11. on leave from France. Going to Cologne – army of occupation. They on river in canoe…

Henry to London. Saw guns in St James’ Park.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/9)