“He speaks well on the whole of his treatment in the prisoners’ camp”

Cigarettes were this year’s Christmas gift for Maidenhead soldiers.

OUR SOLDIERS.

A letter of Christmas greeting was again sent to each of our soldiers, and a packet of cigarettes to those who were overseas. We hope that in a very short time the majority of them will be back amongst us. Robert Bolton and Alfred Isaac have already been discharged. Reginald Hill was at home for Christmas leave, looking quite recovered after his long hospital experiences. Wallace Mattingley and George Ayres are in Germany.

We are glad to hear that 2nd Lieut Edgar Jones, son of Rev. G H. Jones, of Marlow, who, after a few days in France was taken prisoner about 17 months ago, returned home in time for Christmas. He speaks well on the whole of his treatment in the prisoners’ camp.

Maidenhead Congregational magazine, January 1919 (D/N33/12/1/5)

Advertisements

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

He had gone “over the top” more than 17 times

There was news of men from Maidenhead Congregationalists.

OUR SOLDIERS.

Alfred Isaac is at the Crystal Palace, in training for the Navy. George Ayres is at Anglesey, in daily expectation of orders for overseas. Wallace Mattingley is in Ireland. A. J. Lane is having his first experience of life in the front lines. Alfred Vardy is map-making a few miles from the coast in France. Reginald Hill is still in hospital at Cliveden. Ernest Bristow is daily looking for his discharge. Mr. and Mrs. Sale recently spent a day in Maidenhead, visiting their old friends. Mr. Sale is passed in the highest class for general service, and was “joining up” immediately.”

DEATH OF BENJAMIN GIBBONS.

The distressing news has just come to hand that Benjamin Gibbons was killed in action on June 24th. It is scarcely more than three weeks since he went back to France, after some time in Ireland. When he was last home on furlough he was far from well, but he was quite ready to return. In answer to a question he said that he had gone “over the top” more than 17 times. May God’s tenderest consolation be with the bereaved parents.

Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine (D/N33/12/1/5)

“In the pink of condition”

There was news of some of the men from Maidenhead Congregational Church who had joined up.

CONCERNING THE MILITARY.

Cyril Hews is enjoying a month’s holiday at home, on rejoining after earning his discharge. Harold Islip was home for the usual few days leave during the second week in May, and seemed to be in the pink of condition. Percy Lewis is at a Base Hospital on the coast some twelve miles south of Boulogne. Charles Catliffe, Alfred Lane, and C. S. Vardy have joined the Royal Engineers (4/1) who are in training in Maidenhead. Stephen Harris has enlisted in the Berks Regt., Alfred Isaac has been granted exemption until August 1st.

F.C. Taylor has been passed over by the Military authorities to the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, for “work of National Importance.” He has been appointed to the charge of a new Undenominational Settlement at Melton Mowbray, for boys and girls who have passed through the Police Court, or have been in trouble in some other way. Mr. Taylor will be taking up his work in a week or two. It will be a great loss to us to be deprived of our Sunday School Secretary, but we shall all be glad that his difficulties have straightened out so satisfactorily.

THE CLUB ROOM.

Notwithstanding the light evenings, our soldiers’ club-room is almost as well used as during the winter months. Many of the men write all their letters there, and rely upon the Refreshment Department for their suppers.


Maidenhead Congregational Church magazine, June 1916 (D/N33/12/1/5)