“Right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style”

This supplement to the roll of honour’s bald list of names gives us more detail about the parish’s fallen heroes.

Supplement to the Wargrave Parish Magazine

ROLL OF HONOUR.
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of thy compassion: We remember before thee our brethren who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness of all our sins, and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself to us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

Baker, Edward
Private, 7th Wiltshire Regiment, killed in action on the Salonica Front, April 24th, 1917, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker. He was born at Wargrave and educated at the Piggott School. When the war commenced he was working as a grocer’s assistant in Wargrave. He volunteered in 1915 and was sent out in 1916. He was killed by a shell in a night charge.

Barker, Percy William

Private, 7th Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment/ Killed at Salonica, July 4th 1917, aged 19. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. William Barker at Yeldall Lodge. His father was for twenty years a gardener at Yeldall. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the village school. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. He was one of the most helpful lads on the Boys’ Committee of the Boys’ Club. He volunteered May 11th, 1916. On July 4th, 1917, he was hit by a piece of shell from enemy aircraft while bathing and died within an hour. The Chaplain wrote to his parents “Your loss is shared by the whole battalion”.

Bennett, William
Sergeant, 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in France, Dec 3rd, 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bennett, of Wargrave, and when the war broke out he was working on a farm. He volunteered at once. He was killed instantly by a shell. One of his officers wrote: “Sergt. Bennett was the best N.C.O. we had in the company. Fearless, hardworking, willing, he was a constant inspiration to his platoon. His splendid record must inevitably have led to his decoration. We have lost an invaluable N.C.O. and a fine man. He was buried with all possible reverence about half a mile from Eaucourt L’Abbaye”.

Boyton, Bertram
Lieut., 6th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds in Palestine, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 36. He was educated at King’s College, London, and was a Surveyor and Architect by profession. He was a Fellow of the Surveyors Institute and had won Gold and Silver Medals of the Society of Auctioneers by examination. He was married to Elsie, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Morris, at the Parish Church, Wargrave, Sept. 7th 1905, He was a member of the London Rowing Club and the Henley Sailing Club, and keenly interested in all athletics. He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company in April 1915. He was given a commission in the 6th London R.F.A., in July 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant soon after. He went to France with his battery in June 1916, and to Salonica in the following November. He was sent to Egypt and Palestine in June 1917, and was wounded while taking his battery into action in an advance on November 6th. He died at El Arish on November 9th, 1917.

Buckett, Ernest Frederick

Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action Sept. 20th, 1917, in France, aged 23. The dearly loved husband of Dorothy May Buckett, married May 31st, 1917. He was educated at the Henley National School, and before the War was a slaughterman with Messrs. O’Hara & Lee, butchers, Henley and Wargrave. In 1910 he joined the Berkshire Yeomanry (Territorial Force), and was called up on August 4th, 1914, at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in the spring of 1915. When he had completed his five years service, since the date of his enlistment, he volunteered for another year, but received his discharge as a time-expired man in January 1916. In July, 1916, he was called up under the new regulations and sent immediately to France where he remained, except for leave on the occasion of his marriage, until he fell in action, September 20th, 1917.

Chancellor, Richard Albert Beresford
Capt., 7th Royal Berkshire Regiment, died of wounds received in action on the Salonica Front, Dec 24th, 1916, aged 21. He was educated at Harrow where he was Head of his House, gained, inter alia, the Shakespeare Gold Medal, and in his last year, played in the Eton and Harrow Match. He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford, in 1914, but volunteered for service on Aug. 25th of that year. He received his commission on Sept 23rd; joined his regiment on Oct 2nd; became full Lieutenant on Jan. 10th, 1915, and Captain on March 28th, 1916. He was sent to the French Front on Sept. 18th, 1915 and thence to Salonica on the following Nov. 18th. He was chosen by his colonel “as a most reliable and competent officer” to conduct an attack against the Bulgarian trenches on the evening of Dec. 23rd, 1916, but fell wounded while gallantly leading his men and died the next morning. The attack proved wholly successful and had he lived, Capt. Chancellor would have been recommended for the D.S.O. he was mentioned in despatches by General Milne, dated March 29th, 1917, “for gallant and distinguished service in the field”.

Clarke, William Battersby
Petty Officer, R.N., died Jan. 30th, 1918, aged 53. He joined the Navy as a boy and served his full time of twenty-two years. He then joined the reserve and came to Wargrave in 1902. He had completed twelve years of service in the Reserve when the war broke out, and he was called up in August 1914. He was sent to German East Africa, where he remained on H.M.S. Laconia until July, 1916. He was then quartered at Chatham and other home bases until the sudden breakdown of his health in Jan. 1918. He married in 1894 Margery Voyzey who survives him with two daughters. He was buried in Wargrave churchyard.

Collins, John William
Private in the Berkshire Yeomanry, died a prisoner of war in Constantinople, 1916. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. William Collins. He joined the Yeomanry in 1912 and at the outbreak of the war was assisting his father in the grocery business at Wargrave. He was sent to Gallipoli, was taken prisoner, and died of fever in the enemy’s hands.

Cook, Cyril Edward
2nd Lieutenant, Royal Sussex Regiment, died of wounds, July 8th, 1916, aged 23. He was the elder don of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Cook, of Wargrave and 197 Edgware Road, W. He was educated at Maidenhead College and Roysse’s School, Abingdon. At Abingdon he gained the School Exhibition for Pembroke College, Oxford. He was an undergraduate at the outbreak of war, when he joined the Universities and Public Schools Battalion, subsequently getting his commission in the Royal Sussex Regiment. He was sent to the Front in August 1915, and remained in France until he fell wounded on July 1st, 1916, the first day of the big attack on the Somme. He was commended on Feb. 5th, 1916 by the Major-General Commanding First Division, who wrote:- “I have read with great pleasure the report of your conduct in good scouting in the Loos-Hulluch Section between Nov. 15th, 1915, to Jan. 15th, 1916, and the skilful leading of patrols.”

Cox, Edwin Walter
Private, Royal Berkshire Regiment. Gardener to Mrs. Bolton, at The Orchard, Wargrave, from 1910 until called up June 1st, 1916. He married in 1907 Fanny Greenaway, of Wargrave, who survives him. He was sent to France Sept. 21st, 1916. On the night of Feb. 4th, 1917, his platoon was carrying out some work in “No Man’s Land” between the hostile trenches. He was appointed stretcher bearer and placed in the rear of the party, but he was shot through the heart by a sniper and killed instantly. He was buried with all military honours at Priez Farm, one mile E.S.E. of Combles. Aged 32.

Doe, William
Private, North Staffordshire Regiment, killed in action in Mesopotamia, Feb. 26th, 1917, aged 26. He was born at Rufford Abbey, Nottinghamshire. He was the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Doe. His father was for seventeen years head gardener at Rufford Abbey. He was educated at Malmesbury School, Wiltshire. On leaving school he went in for gardening, and at the outbreak of war he was in the service of Lady Burton at Rangemore Hall, Staffordshire. He volunteered in August, 1914 and was trained at Lichfield, Devonport, and Tynemouth. He was sent to the Dardanelles, Aug. 7th, 1915. In the following year he was sent to Mesopotamia, where he remained until his death. He was buried near the Pontoon Bridge at Shumram, close to the Aerodrome.

Doughty, Herbert
Canteen Assistant, H.M.S. Queen Mary, killed in action May 31st, 1916 aged 18. He was the youngest of six sailor brothers, sons of Mrs. Doughty of the “Queen Victoria” public-house, Hare Hatch, Widow of Joseph Wright Doughty, Chief Petty Officer, R.N. He entered the service of Messrs. William Miller, Ltd., Naval Contractors, Portsea, in 1913, and went to sea. In December, 1914, he was sent to H.M.S. Queen Mary, and remained aboard until the last. He was killed at the Battle of Jutland, May 31st, 1916, when his ship was destroyed after a most terrific action. A letter from the Admiralty reported him “a steady, trustworthy lad.”

French, George William
Private, 1/5th Gloucester Regiment, killed in action in Belgium, Oct. 1st, 1917, aged 23. He was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. George French of Wargrave. He was educated at the Piggott School, and at the commencement of the war he was working as a fishmonger’s assistant in Wargrave. He was anxious to join up but was delayed by ill health. He volunteered Oct. 11th, 1916, and was sent to France in the following June. On Oct. 1st, he fell mortally wounded and died the same night. He was buried at Dozinghem.

Griffin, William
Private, 1st Royal Berks, killed in action, Nov. 30th, 1917, at Cambrai, aged 25. Fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Griffin, Keeper’s Lodge, Culham Court. He was born at Kirtlington, Oxon. His grandfather was for seventeen years gamekeeper to Sir Henry Dashwood, Bart., at Kirtlington, and his father was on the same estate for many years. After leaving school he occupied various places in hotel service. In Feb. 1915, he joined the Reserve for Home Service, but soon afterwards volunteered for abroad and was sent to France in July, 1915. He served at Givenchy and Loos. He was at home in Jan., 1916 for ten days leave, but otherwise remained in France until his death.

Henry, Cyril Charles
2nd Lieut., 4th Hussars, killed in action Sept. 26th, 1915 in France, aged 22. He was the only child of Sir Charles and Lady Henry, of Parkwood. He was educated at Harrow and received his commission just before the war broke out. He was leading this platoon with the greatest gallantry in an attack on the enemy on Sept. 26th, 1915 when he was killed by machine-gun fire. He was buried where he fell. He was reported missing, and it was not until March, 1916, that proof of his death was obtained. A soldier who knew him well, and who could give sure evidence of his death and burial had himself been wounded the next day and sent home. It was not until this soldier returned to the front that the Commanding Officer was able to make certain of his fate. He then wrote to Sir Charles Henry:- “From the position in which your son’s body was found there is no doubt that he was right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style.” He goes on to say:- “The part that the battalion took in the attack in Loos will ever remain an honourable page in the history of the regiment and had far more important influence than the bald dispatch indicates. Private Butler says he knows the spot and could identify it… it was in a place called Eli Avenue, which is still held by our troops.”

Holland, William Francis Claude

Captain, attached Durham Light Infantry, died Nov. 8th, 1917, aged 52. He was educated at Eton and Brasenose College, Oxford. He rowed in the Eton eight, four times for Oxford in the Oxford and Cambridge race, and many times in the Leander eight. He was a famous rowing coach. When the war broke out he retired from business and was residing in Wargrave. He volunteered in June 1915, and was appointed Draft Conducting Officer. He died suddenly from heart failure caused by frostbite, contracted in the performance of his military duties.

Hunt, Arthur
Private, Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in action in France, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Arthur Hunt, Tag Lane, Hare Hatch, where he was born. On leaving school he worked for his father, who was for twenty-nine years gardener at the Lodge, Hare Hatch. He was a Boy Scout of the Wargrave Troop with the badge of a King’s Scout, as well as badges for Cycling, Gardening, Pioneering, Printing, Red Cross Work, Shooting, Swimming, and Typewriting. He volunteered Nov. 19th, 1914, and went to the Front in June, 1915. He fell on Nov. 19th, 1916 and was buried in Dernancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, which is north-west of Albert.

Jennings, Sidney B.
Private in the 48th Battalion Canadian Scottish Highlanders, killed in France, May 20th, 1915. At the outbreak of war he was in British Columbia working as a grocer’s assistant, and he immediately volunteered. His home was at Wargrave and he was one of five soldier brothers. He was sent to France, and was reported missing at Festubert, May 24th, 1915, afterwards reported killed.

Larkin, William
Private in Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action in France, July 23rd, 1916, aged 22. He was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. John Larkin, living at Wargrave. He was born at Marlow but was educated during the last two of his school years at the Wargrave Piggott School. Before the war, he was learning the trade of a bricklayer. He joined the Territorials in 1914, and when called up at the outbreak of war, immediately volunteered for foreign service. He was sent out to France in March, 1915. He was wounded in August, and returned home for six days leave at the time of his 21st birthday, in September, 1915. He returned to the front thoroughly restored in health and remained there until he lost his life in an attack on the German trenches near Pozières, on July, 23rd, 1916. An officer wrote to say what a good comrade and friend he was to those who worked with him in the regiment.

Light, James Henry

Private in Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action in France on Aug. 22nd, 1916. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Light, at Crazies Hill, where he was born. He was educated as a Piggott Scholar at the Wargrave School. After leaving school he went to farm work. He joined the Oxfordshire Territorials in 1912 and was called up at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service, but his health was continually bad, and he spent several months in hospitals in England. However, he recovered his strength and was sent to France in May, 1916, where he remained until his death. He was buried with religious rites in a burial ground with other of his fallen comrades.

Light, Harry

Private in Royal Berkshire Regiment, brother of James Light, killed in action, Sept. 25th, 1915, at Loos, aged 22. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the Wargrave Piggott School. After leaving school he went to farm work. He enlisted in 1913, and was sent to India. When war broke out his regiment was recalled to England and sent to France in Jan., 1915. He fell in action as his company went over the top and was instantly killed. He was buried at Poperinche.

Lovejoy, Edward William

Private, 1st Middlesex Regiment, killed in action April 23rd, 1917, aged 22. He was the only child of Mrs. Sarah Lovejoy, widow of William Alfred Lovejoy, who was for 19 years coachman at Bowerdens. He was educated at the Crazies Hill School. He began work in the gardens of Park Place. When war broke out he volunteered in August, 1914, and was sent to the front in France Jan., 1915. He came home, after being wounded with shrapnel in the hand, in Dec., 1916, and returned to the Front Jan., 1917. He was killed instantaneously by a shell on April 23rd, as he was going over the top with his company in an attack at Arras. The Chaplain wrote that he had a high reputation as a good man and a good soldier. He was buried in a properly established British Military Cemetery with religious rites.

Morse, George

Private, Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in action in France, July 27th, 1916 aged 33. At the commencement of the war, he was working on the farm at Parkwood, he immediately volunteered Aug. 4th, 1914, and was sent out to France on Aug. 27th of the same year. He was killed on the Somme Front. He married Frances Denton, who survives him with three children.

Newham, Frederick William
Rifleman, Middlesex Regiment, attached London Rifle Brigade. Eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Newham, in the gardens Wargrave Manor, died in the enemy’s hands Oct. 15th, 1916 aged 19. He was educated at the Middlesex County School, North Finchley. On leaving school he was employed in the Goods Office of the Great Northern Railway as clerk. He was a Sunday School teacher in the Wesleyan Church at North Finchley. He volunteered immediately upon his seventeenth birthday, Nov., 1914. After his training he was sent to Gibraltar, and later to Cairo. In March 1916, he was sent to France. On Oct 8th he was reported “Missing.” In Jan., 1917, the War Office reported that he had died from wounds whilst prisoner in Germany on Oct. 15th, 1916.

Nicholls, Albert James
Private, Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in action in France, April 22nd, 1916, aged 21. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Edward Nicholls, Culham Pitch Cottages. He was born at Bix and educated at Bix and Binfield Heath Schools. After leaving school he took to farm work, and had been on one of Lord Hambleden’s farms for two years when he enlisted, March, 1914. He was sent to France in Nov., was wounded in Jan., 1915, and after a short leave home returned to the front. On April 22nd, 1916, he was one of a ration party to the firing line when they were suddenly caught by shell fire. He was killed instantaneously.

Noble, Norris Heatley
2nd Lieut., 1st Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps (60th Rifles), died at Abbeville on August 15th, of wounds received in action at Delville Wood, Somme, July 27th, 1916. He was the younger son of Heatley Noble, of Temple Combe, in this parish. born May 9th, 1897, educated at Malvern College and the R.M.C. Sandhurst, receiving his commission in March, 1915.
From the Malvern School Paper:-
“A radiant nature and a boy of great charm, his early death cut short what seemed likely to prove a promising career, and he will be ever remembered by his generation as the embodiment of good temper and good humour in all the changing fortunes of daily life.”

Perry, William Francis
Private, 1st Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in action in Belgium, Oct., 25th, 1914, aged 19. The first to fall from the parish of Wargrave. He was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. George Perry. He was born at Hurley and educated at Caversham. After leaving school he went to farm work. He enlisted in the spring of 1913. A good marksman, he won the crossed guns three times. He was sent to ~France at the very commencement of the war and was killed at Zonnebeke. The Star of Mons will be given to his parents.

Platt, Lionel Sydney

Captain, 17th Lancers, attached Royal Flying Corps, killed in action April 13th, 1917, aged 31 years. He was the only son of Sydney and Bertha Platt of Wargrave Manor, and married Gillian Spencer Warwick on Nov. 11th, 1914. He was educated at Cheam and Eton, and after leaving school matriculated at Magdalen College, Oxford. In Dec., 1905, he received his commission in the 17th Lancers, and was sent to India to join his regiment. In the spring of 1913 he returned to England as Adjutant of the Denbighshire Yeomanry. He was sent to Egypt with his Yeomanry in March, 1916, where he remained until he returned to England to join the Royal Flying Corps, in August of the same year. He was gazetted pilot in November, went to France in December, promoted flight-commander in Feb., 1917, and was killed in an aerial combat north-east of Vitry en Artois in April.

Playford, Patrick Randal
Lieut., R.F.A., killed in action at Ypres, July 1st, 1917, aged 25. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Randal Playford, and grandson of Francis Playford of Stanwell Moor, Middlesex, and of Major Even Bruce-Gardyne, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He was educated at Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, and the School of Mines, Camborne, Cornwall. After leaving Camborne he was sent to Rhodesia, on the staff of the Globe and Phoenix Mine, returning to England just before the outbreak of war. He volunteered at once, and having been a member of the Glenalmond Officers’ Training Corps, he was at once given a commission in the 1st West Lancashire R.F.A., 55th Division. He went to the Front in August, 1915, and passed safely through many important battles on the Somme and elsewhere. Owing to the casualties in his battery he had for three weeks been in command during a very critical time, and in the words of a brother officer, had done “wonderful work”. His Major, who at the last, had just taken over the command of the battery, wrote that in the short time he had been with him he “had many opportunities of appreciating his sterling worth, undaunted courage, and high sense of duty”.

Pugh, Charles
Cook on H.M.S. Trevanion, minesweeper, died of wounds and exposure Dec. 7th, 1916, aged 22. He was the third son of Mrs. Elizabeth Pugh, widow of Charles Pugh, who was the gardener at Yeldall for 28 years. He was educated at the Wargrave Piggott School. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. On Dec. 5th 1916, his ship was blown up by an enemy mine. He was rescued from the water. Commander Cayley wrote that when he was being brought to land in a destroyer he asked the doctor to attend to the other men first as he was not so bad as they were. The Fleet Surgeon reports that he had sustained a frightful injury to his leg, was wounded in the forehead, and suffered from exposure to cold and from immersion in the sea water and floating oil. He was taken to the Royal Naval Hospital at Shotley, where the leg was amputated, but he succumbed to his injuries. His Commander wrote :- “He showed himself an extremely gallant man.”

Richardson, Louis Edward
Lance-Corporal in Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action May 16th, 1915, aged 22. He was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. John Richardson. He was educated at the Modern School, Maidenhead, which was afterwards the Berks County Council Secondary School. After leaving school he assisted his father in the business of a butcher at Wargrave. He joined the Territorial Force, Berks Yeomanry, in 1909. He was called up at the outbreak of the war, August 4th, 1914, and immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in Jan., 1915, and was killed in action at Festubert.

Sharp, Sam

Lance-Corporal, 13th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, killed in action in France, April 11th, 1916, aged 32. He was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. David Sharp, the Holt, Hare Hatch, one of four brothers serving in the army. He was born at Bowsey Hill and educated in the Piggott School, Wargrave. He married Flora Ann Pritchard in Nov., 1911, who survives him with three children. His youngest child was born March 30th, 1916. He fell near Givenchy. The Chaplain wrote that his loss was keenly felt by the whole battalion.

Sharp, Valentine Frederick
Private, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, brother of Sam Sharp, killed in action at Salonica, Sept. 28th, 1917, aged 25. He was born at Hare Hatch and educated at the Wargrave Piggott School. He joined up on July 1st, 1915. He was sent to Gallipoli in Oct., 1915. In December he was buried by a shell and in consequence invalided home. In July 1916, he was sent to the Salonica Front and there killed in action. Death was instantaneous, and he was buried in the British Cemetery close to where he fell. The Company-Quartermaster Sergeant wrote:- “I have been in close touch with him for the last fourteen months, and during that time he was always found cheerful and reliable under the most trying circumstances, and always ready to help a comrade when in difficulties.”

Silver, Frank
Shoeing Smith, Royal Field Artillery, died of heart failure in France, June 30th, 1916, aged 38. He was educated at Wargrave as a Piggott Scholar. He was an old soldier, and served throughout the Boer War. He was awarded two medals, The Queen Victoria Medal with three bars, “Transvaal,” “Orange Free State,” “Cape Colony,”; The King Edward VII. Medal with two bars “South Africa, 1901,” “South Africa, 1902.” When the war began he had been out of the Reserve for five years, but he volunteered in January, 1915, and was sent to France in the following August. He died suddenly while walking in camp. His Captain wrote:- “he had always proved himself a good soldier and a willing worker, also from his conversation with me at different times, I know he was a loving husband and a good father.” He married in 1907 Mary Ann Marshall, who survives him with five children.

Smith, Eric Arthur Rae
2nd Lieut., 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1st City of Birmingham Battalion), killed in action in France, July 22nd, 1916, aged 27. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, and married in July 1915, Guilhermia, younger daughter of the late Charles Edward Watson, medical practitioner of Wargrave, who survives him. He had studied Agriculture at University College, Reading, and was farming near Rugby when the war commenced. He volunteered, and received his commission in May, 1915. After a period of training at Keble College, Oxford, he was posted to the 3rd Battalion Royal Warwicks at the Isle of Wight. He was sent to France May 22nd, 1916 and fell on July 22nd.

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