“Right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style”

This supplement to the roll of honour’s bald list of names gives us more detail about the parish’s fallen heroes.

Supplement to the Wargrave Parish Magazine

ROLL OF HONOUR.
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of thy compassion: We remember before thee our brethren who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness of all our sins, and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself to us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

Baker, Edward
Private, 7th Wiltshire Regiment, killed in action on the Salonica Front, April 24th, 1917, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker. He was born at Wargrave and educated at the Piggott School. When the war commenced he was working as a grocer’s assistant in Wargrave. He volunteered in 1915 and was sent out in 1916. He was killed by a shell in a night charge.

Barker, Percy William

Private, 7th Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment/ Killed at Salonica, July 4th 1917, aged 19. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. William Barker at Yeldall Lodge. His father was for twenty years a gardener at Yeldall. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the village school. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. He was one of the most helpful lads on the Boys’ Committee of the Boys’ Club. He volunteered May 11th, 1916. On July 4th, 1917, he was hit by a piece of shell from enemy aircraft while bathing and died within an hour. The Chaplain wrote to his parents “Your loss is shared by the whole battalion”.

Bennett, William
Sergeant, 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in France, Dec 3rd, 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bennett, of Wargrave, and when the war broke out he was working on a farm. He volunteered at once. He was killed instantly by a shell. One of his officers wrote: “Sergt. Bennett was the best N.C.O. we had in the company. Fearless, hardworking, willing, he was a constant inspiration to his platoon. His splendid record must inevitably have led to his decoration. We have lost an invaluable N.C.O. and a fine man. He was buried with all possible reverence about half a mile from Eaucourt L’Abbaye”.

Boyton, Bertram
Lieut., 6th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds in Palestine, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 36. He was educated at King’s College, London, and was a Surveyor and Architect by profession. He was a Fellow of the Surveyors Institute and had won Gold and Silver Medals of the Society of Auctioneers by examination. He was married to Elsie, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Morris, at the Parish Church, Wargrave, Sept. 7th 1905, He was a member of the London Rowing Club and the Henley Sailing Club, and keenly interested in all athletics. He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company in April 1915. He was given a commission in the 6th London R.F.A., in July 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant soon after. He went to France with his battery in June 1916, and to Salonica in the following November. He was sent to Egypt and Palestine in June 1917, and was wounded while taking his battery into action in an advance on November 6th. He died at El Arish on November 9th, 1917.

Buckett, Ernest Frederick

Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action Sept. 20th, 1917, in France, aged 23. The dearly loved husband of Dorothy May Buckett, married May 31st, 1917. He was educated at the Henley National School, and before the War was a slaughterman with Messrs. O’Hara & Lee, butchers, Henley and Wargrave. In 1910 he joined the Berkshire Yeomanry (Territorial Force), and was called up on August 4th, 1914, at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in the spring of 1915. When he had completed his five years service, since the date of his enlistment, he volunteered for another year, but received his discharge as a time-expired man in January 1916. In July, 1916, he was called up under the new regulations and sent immediately to France where he remained, except for leave on the occasion of his marriage, until he fell in action, September 20th, 1917. (more…)

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These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

Voluntary workers get badges

Ladies from Crazies Hill were honoured for their hard work sewing and knitting for the wounded.

Crazies Hill Notes

With reference to the Working Party, Miss Rhodes has kindly forwarded the following:-

The Director General of Voluntary Organizations has issued Voluntary Workers’ Badges to the following members of the Crazies Hill Working Party who are entitled to a Badge, under the rules of the Association:-

Mrs. French Miss Kate Willis
Mrs. Whiting Miss Fleming
Mrs. Light Miss A. Fleming
Mrs. Waldron Mrs. Barfoot
Mrs. Habbits Mrs. Norris
Mrs. Stephens Miss Goodall
Mrs. King Mrs. Huckle
Miss Rose Mrs. Rhodes
Miss Mary Rose Miss Rhodes
Miss Beck

A letter received from the Secretary of the Hon. Lady Monro’s Hospital Depot says:

“Will you congratulate your workers for the splendid way in which they have worked and for the quality and quantity of their work and that we shall expect and hope for their help next winter. The following is a list of the things made:-

Pyjamas 132
Slippers 28
Mufflers 24
Slings 18
Socks 7 pairs
Mittens 13 pairs
Bed Socks 3 pairs
Helmets 112
Swabs 11
Bed Jackets 11
Treasure Bags 30

Sent to Bartholomews Hospital:-
4 Bed Jackets
13 Bed Gowns.”

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Two sons lost within one year

A number of men from the village of Crazies Hill had been killed, but there was happier news for one family, whose son had been awarded a medal for heroism.

Crazies Hill Notes

Much sympathy is felt for Mr. and Mrs. Light who have lost two sons in the war. Harry, 2nd Royal Berks was killed in action on September 25th of last year, and James Henry, 2/ 4th Oxon and Bucks, was killed in action on August 21st this year.

This double loss, coming in the course of one year, has evoked the deepest sympathy for the family. We trust they will be comforted in this thought and be supported and helped by our prayers for those in bereavement or sorrow.

Much sympathy is also felt for Mrs. Morse whose husband was killed in action on July 27th last.

In addition to those on our list of those who have given their lives for their country, and whom we remember before God at our Intercession Services are the names of Thomas Barrett, Ernest Edwards, Fred Eggerton, William Gray, Cyril Henry, Albert Nicholls, and Frank Silver.

We are pleased to state that since our last issue Lance- Corporal Herbert Richard Plested of the 1st Royal Berks. Regt. has received the Military Medal.

Wargrave parish magazine, October 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Vegetables and cigarettes

The village of Crazies Hill dedicated its harvest festival to supporting the troops, with gifts of varying levels of healthiness.

Crazies Hill Notes

The Harvest Festival was held on October 15th. Throughout the day the Services were bright and hearty. The congregations were large; indeed everything was in keeping with the joyous occasion. The Children’s Service also, in the afternoon, was well attended. The Children’s offerings were made during the singing of a hymn when the children marched in procession and placed the various articles in a basket. The basket was large, yet was well supplied with packets of cigarettes, sweets, and other things. These were carried to the Parkwood Hospital after the Service as the Children’s gifts for the wounded soldiers.

At the Evening Service the anthem ‘The Lord is My Shepherd’ was rendered very nicely by the Choir. The Special Preacher was the Rev. H. I. Wilson, Rector of Hitcham, to whom we are much indebted for coming.

The decorations were carried out with much care and skill – the building looking a veritable flower garden. It would be difficult to realize the amount of labour and time spent in arranging the flowers, plants, corn and vegetables. The result was certainly beautiful. We are very grateful to the following who so generously gave their labour and time: Mrs. Light, Mrs. Habbitts, Mrs. Wakefield, Mrs. Woodward, Miss Rose, Miss Stanton, Miss Beck, and Miss Doe, and the following who so kindly sent gifts: – Mrs. Whiting, flowers and vegetable marrow; Miss Beck, flowers; Mrs. William Willis, plants; Mrs. Hull, flowers; Mrs. Weller, flowers; Mrs. Goodwin, flowers; Mr. Kimble, flowers and vegetables. Mr. Griffin, flowers; Mr. Bacon, bread; Mr. Stanton, flowers. Miss Fleming, corn and wheat; Miss Rose, flowers; The Hon. Mrs. Crawford, corn; Capt. Willis, flowers.

We are also indebted to Parkwood for so kindly sending a collection of choice plants.

The collections throughout the day, which were in aid of the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, amounted to £1 10s. 7 ½ d.

The vegetables and flowers were sent to Wargrave Military Hospital, Mr. Whiting most kindly conveying them thither.

Throughout the day offerings of cigarettes, etc., were most generously made for our men serving at the present time.

Wargrave parish magazine, November 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

A gallant example: the first war memorial

Wargrave parish church was reopened after restoration following a 1914 fire (believed to have been set by suffragettes) on 23 July 1916. It incorporated what may be the first general war memorial for WWI.

The Roll of Honour

In all the beautiful service of Consecration, on Saturday, July 22nd, there was no more touching prayer than that in dedication of the East Window:-

Bishop
In the faith of Jesus Christ we dedicate this Window to the glory of God and in memory of those who having gone forth from this place have laid down or shall have laid down their lives in this war, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Vicar
Her light was like unto a stone most precious.

People Even like a jasper stone, clear as crystal.

When we look at the window our hearts are uplifted in the faith that those who suffer with Christ shall also reign with Him in Glory. And we may remember before God the names of those who have given their lives for us: A Roll which has been sadly increased in this last month.

William Francis Perry. Oct. 25th, 1914.
Louis Richardson. May 16th, 1915.
Harry Light. Sept. 25th, 1915.
Cyril Henry. Sept. 26th, 1915.
Sam Sharp. April 11th, 1916.
Albert Nicholls. April 22nd, 1916.
Sidney Jennings. May 15th, 1916.
Herbert Doughty. May 31st, 1916.
Frank Silver. June 20th, 1916.
Cyril Edward Cook. July 8th, 1916.
Eric Arthur Smith. July 22nd, 1916.
William Larkin. July 23rd, 1916.
George Morse. July 27th, 1916.
Norris Heatley Nobie. Aug. 15th, 1916.
James Henry Light. Aug. 22nd, 1916.

We thank God for the gallant example of their lives and we pray God that He may comfort the hearts of those who mourn.

Wargrave parish magazine, September1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

More Wargrave men join up

More Wargrave men had joined up or headed to the danger of the Front.

The Roll of Honour
The following names have not yet appeared on the Roll:

The Royal Navy
Cash, John
Goulding, Frederick John.

The Army
Alderton, Freeman James. Army Services Corps
Andrew, Herbert. Royal Engineers
F Baker, John Edward. Wiltshire Regiment
F Beek, Harold. Rifle Brigade
F Beck, Rex. South Oxfordshire Yeomanry
Bridgman, George Henry. Army Services Corps
F Briscoe, Frederick John. 1st Australian Light Horse
Brooker, William. Army Services Corps
Butler, William John. Corpl. Army Services Corps
Cook, Cyril Edward. 2nd Lieut. IIIrd Royal Sussex
Charlton, Sidney, Charles. Army Services Corps
F Clover, William. Sergt.-Major. Royal Flying Corps
Clover, Arthur. Royal Engineers
F Clover, Albert. Royal Army Medical Corps
F Dixon, Thomas. Grenadier Guards
F Elsley, Percy. Ox and Bucks Light Infy
Goodwin, Arthur. Royal Berks Regiment
Hannen, Nicholas James. 2nd Lieut. Army Services Corps
Harris, George. Rifle Brigade
F Iles, James. Queen’s Bays
Light, Harry. Royal Berks Regiment
Mark, John. Suffolk Yeomanry
Smith, Eric Arthur Roe. 2nd Lieut. IIIrd Royal Warwicks.

The following have gone to Front since the last record.
Douglas W. Bennett, Lieut. Arthur Bradley, Albert Brooker, Charles Critcher, Walter Albert George, William Hall, Arthur Hunt, Kenneth Nicholl, Captain. Eric Heatley Noble, 2nd Lieut. T. Slatter and Arthur Talbot.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

Good things to learn from the great evil of war

Several Crazies Hill soldiers had recently come home on leave, but the village’s women seemed to be tiring of making comforts for the troops.

Crazies Hill Notes

July has been a busy month, though a quiet one, with us here at Crazies Hill, with no very special feature to call for comment. The farmers have been busy at the hay, which has by this practically all been harvested, and as the weather on the whole has been propitious it has been secured in good condition. I am sure that one of the many good things which, under God, we shall learn from this great evil of war will be to set a truer value upon God’s gifts to man in the harvest.

It is with much pleasure that we see our Sailors and Soldiers, who from time to time come home for the short rest they have so richly earned. We have recently had the pleasure of seeing Leonard Oakley Jemmett, Willie Waldron, Joseph Kimble and Harold Beck, of whom the three former have been at their posts since August last, and the latter since November.

The attendance at the Wednesday Afternoon Working Party, at which comforts etc. are being made for our wounded soldiers, has lately shown signs of failing numbers. This does not mean, I am quite confident, that interest is lanquishing, but is undoubtedly due to the pressure of other duties, and for the time being even more important duties, such as helping on the hay fields etc.

In connection with these meetings I should like to say how much we owe Mrs. Light and Mrs. Habbits, for their unfailing energies and the admirable way in which they direct these Working Parties.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

The right sort

By December 1914 the village of Knowl Hill had given 76 young men to the armed forces. Now it faced the sober reality of the news that several had lost their lives.

Collections for Waifs and Strays Society at Evensong on the 20th, and on Christmas Day at the 7 a.m., 8.30 a.m., and 11 a.m. services. Like others this Society is making a special effort to be helpful at this terrible war time. It hopes to assist some orphan children.

We are much grieved to hear the news about the death of H. Woods, one of our soldiers at the front. We trust there may be some mistake, as there is as yet no official confirmation of the news. He would leave a widow and two little children, for whom we should all feel deep sympathy. We have also heard with deep regret of the death of Mr. Blackman’s soldier son, and of Oliver Reed, an able seaman, drowned when H.M.S “Good Hope” was sunk in the engagement off the Chilian Coast on Nov. 1st. Oliver Reed was a much liked and excellent footballer in this neighbourhood.

We are, alas only able to record this month the names of two new soldiers from our parish, Charles Hopgood and John Light, thus making our list 76; but these two are the right sort. Ought not our number to be at least 100? We hope the excellent letter sent to each household by the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee will be thoughtfully read. Putting off decision to do right is very fatal. The Vicar will most gladly lend the letter to any who may wish to read it.

Knowl Hill section of Wargrave parish magazine, December 1914 (D/P145/28A/31)