Two minutes of perfect silence and stillness

Schools remembered the Armistice one year earlier on the first Remembrance Day.

Bracknell
11th November 1919

Today is the first anniversary of the armistice. All the children and staff assembled around the flagstaff. Just before 11 a.m the Headmaster read the King’s proclamation – the flag was lowered to half mast and two minutes of perfect silence and stillness was observed as a simple service of silence and remembrance. Children sang ‘God save the King’ and special lessons on ‘The League of Nations’ were given in the upper classes.

White Waltham
November 11th 1919

Today Nov 11th is the first anniversary of the Armistice which stayed the world wide carnage of the four preceding years and marked the victory of Right and freedom. The King has sent the following message to the people with a request that his message should be read to the pupils in all schools.

Kings Message:

I believe my people in every part of the Empire fervently wish to perpetuate the memory of that Great Deliverance and of those who laid down their lives to achieve it.

To afford an opportunity for the universal expression of this feeling it is my desire and hope that at the hour when the armistice came into force, the eleventh our of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, there may be for one brief space of two minutes a complete suspension of all normal activities. During that time, except in rare cases where this may be impractical, all work, all sound, and all locomotion should cease, as that in perfect stillness the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the Glorious Dead.

No elaborate organisation appears to be necessary. At a given signal, which can easily be arranged the suit the circumstances of each locality. I believe that we shall, all gladly interrupt our business and pleasure, whatever it may be and unite in this simple service of Silence and Remeberance.

George R.I.

Programme:

10.50 All Children assembled in Large Room
10.55 Brief explanation of reason of assembly and the Reading of the King’s Message.
11-11.2 Reverent Remembrance of the Glorious Dead in Silence
11.3 Singing of Hymn “On the Resurrection Morning” to end a most impressive service
11.10 Resumption of work.

Eastbury
11th November 1919

The League of Nations Day Nov. 11th. At eleven o’ clock a pause was made in the ordinary work. The bell tolled thirteen times as that was the number of men at Eastbury who have made the great sacrifice. During that time the names of the dead heroes were written on the blackboard, while all the children stood silent, seeming to realise the act of honour the silence was giving to the glorious dead.

Prayers for the departed were read and the prayer for peace and a hymn was sung. The children seemed much impressed by the lessons that were given. The King’s letter was read. The national anthem concluded the service.

King Street School, Maidenhead
11th November 1919

The Anniversary of Armistice Day was kept in school by a complete change of timetable commencing with a simple musical service of praise & worship & an address to the children on “Give to the world the best you have” as a basis for a League of Nations.

The Silence Time (which is a daily occurrence here) was devoted to the sending of love & affection to the fathers of our children killed in the war & yet still near them. The lessons throughout the day were in relation to this, & bigger children were allowed to take home what they had written about the Great Day.

A widowed mother called in the afternoon & told of the cheer she had received from her little boy’s expression of what has been told him in school today.

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The site for the Berkshire war memorial should be the Forbury Hill

A site was selected for a Berkshire war memorial.

21 October 1919
Executive Committee meeting

Present: J Herbert Benyon, President
Messrs Foley, Bates, Willink, Belcher, Bradbury, Barker, Quelch, Howell, Hayward, Johnson (Town Clerk), Arman (secretary).

The Secretary reported that the land in the Caversham Road, suggested as a possible site, could not be obtained for a lesser sum than £5000. He stated that it was understood that the Forbury Hill site would most likely be granted by the Town Council if desired.

The suggested designs sent in by the undermentioned gentlemen were on view and received consideration:

No. 1. Lt C H Perkins, ARIBA, Bracknell
2. J H Willett, Caversham
3. C B Willcocks, Reading
4. H Hutt, Reading
5. J H Carey & Son, Windsor
6. A N Arman (amateur), Reading
7. F G Belcher (amateur), Reading

A general discussion took place during which a scheme in connection with the new Caversham Bridge was referred to and explained by Mr Howell, and the suggestion was more or less supported by Mr Bates.

It was considered that the committee as a body should view the Exhibition of War Memorials at the Royal Holloway before coming to any conclusion, and it was thought that subsequently it should be debated whether a competitive design should be obtained by offering a premium and throwing the competition open generally, or whether it would be best to place the matter into the hands of some eminent artist to prepare a design and advise generally.

In order that some definite progress be made it was proposed by Councillor Quelch, seconded by Col Barker, that the site for the memorial should be the Forbury Hill in the Forbury Gardens, Reading. Carried.

The secretary was requested to make a formal application to the Town Council for the grant of the site in question. He was also requested to send a report of the committee meeting to the newspapers announcing the decision as to the site (subject to the approval of the Town Council).

Mr Hayward moved, and Mr Bates seconded, that Dr Stewart-Abram, the mayor-elect, be invited to join the committee. Passed unanimously.

The secretary submitted proposals, which were approved by the committee, to print and circulate throughout the county a poster asking that the names of Berkshire men for record on the memorial be sent to the vicars of the respective parishes; that the vicar of each parish in the county be asked to co-operate in obtaining the names of the men for record purposes; to print and circulate the suggested letter to the vicars of parishes together with the record card of which drafts were adopted. Similar applications for co-operation to be sent to the Comrades of the Great War and the Federation of Discharged Sailors & Soldiers.

Berkshire War Memorial Committee minutes (R/D134/3/1)

A large muster

The Comrades of the Great War was one of several organisations for veterans of the war.

At the request of the Comrades of the Great War, a service was held for them conducted by the Vicar, in the Vicarage Garden, on Sunday afternoon, July 27th. There was a large muster. The men assembled at the bottom of Bracknell Street and preceded by the Band marched to the Vicarage Lawn. Admiral Eustace, Commandant of the Wokingham Branch, was in command. Sir Dudley de Chair met the men at the Vicarage. A short form of service was held, and hymns, some accompanied by the Band, formed a special feature of the service. The Vicar gave an address, and expressed his regret that the Rev. Mr Sheffield was prevented by duties at Bulford Camp from taking part in the service. It is hoped that services of a similar character may be held from time to time for the Comrades.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11)

Fireworks and flares

On 19 July 1919 peace celebrations were held across the county following the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.

St John’s School. Caversham
July 19th 1919

Saturday- to celebrate the conclusion of peace all the children of the town [Reading] were entertained to tea, games etc in either Palmer or Prospect Parks.

King Street School, Maidenhead
19th July 1919

“‘Peace Day’ was kept by a sumptuous tea for the children in school this afternoon. Several people came to help entertain them. An old pupil gave musical selections while children had their tea & the popular airs they were familiar with were much enjoyed.

After tea, cheers were given for the soldiers & the king & concluded with the National Anthem. Children were then taken to Kidwell’s Park to enjoy sports, roundabouts & other amusements.

Aldworth School
July 14th-18th 1919

This week we made 100% attendance!

The Peace celebration was held on Saturday July 19th – Dinner, tea and sports in the old playground, for all parishioners, followed by fireworks and flares in “Battle Field” at Westbridges.

Lower Sandhurst School
July 19th 1919

To day Saturday in common with all parts of the country this Parish held its Peace Festival.

The school children assembled at school and marched to the Wellington Arms where they met the other two schools and headed by a band a procession was formed and a move was made to the Broadway. Here the ceremony of hoisting the flag was performed, prayers and thanksgivings were offered for victory and peace speeches were delivered, Mr. W. J. Joye, Chairman of the Managers, being one of the speakers.

Tea and sports were provided for the children and although the weather was unpropitious the children spent a happy time.

Bracknell Church of England Mixed Primary School
19th July 1919

‘Peace Celebrations’. During the day all school children were specially provided with a tea (followed by a tea for the general public). Sports were also provided for school children, preceded by a procession from the Hall through High Stand to the Sports Ground. All who had served in H. M. Forces during the war were entertained to dinner.

St Peter’s CE School, Earley
19th July 1919

Today was observed as “Peace Celebration Day” for the parish of Earley, & the children of the school, whether living in Earley or in Reading, were included in the invitations. By kind invitation of J Rushbrooke esq, the celebration took place in Bulmershe Park, where, despite showery weather, a most enjoyable afternoon & evening were spent.

Cookham Alwyn Road School log book
July 19th

Saturday: Peace Celebrations. Tea to scholars in School Buildings. March to Kidwells Park at 4.15.

Eastbury National Primary, Lambourn
19th July 1919

Peace celebrations at Eastbury. The school children took part in the procession, sang patriotic songs, and afterwards partook in tea in a lane kindly lent for the occasion. Giving in to the rain, the sports were held on the following Monday.

Charney Bassett
19.7.19

Peace-day was kept up in the village. The children had a tea in a barn kindly lent for the occasion, and the adults a meat tea; owing to the bad weather the sports were postponed until Sat the 26th.

Speenhamland
July 19th

We have been making preparations for the Peace Celebrations tomorrow, and work has to some extent been interrupted.

Bracknell
19th July 1919

Peace Celebrations.

During the day all school children were specially provided with a tea (followed by a tea for the general public). Sports were also provided for school children, preceded by a procession from the Hall through High Stand to the Sports Ground. All who had served in H. M. Forces during the war were entertained to dinner.

Log books of St John’s School. Caversham (89/SCH/14/1); King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1); Aldworth School (C/EL54/3); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL66/1); Bracknell Church of England Mixed Primary School (C/EL45/3); St Peter’s CE School, Earley (SCH36/8/3); Cookham Alwyn Road School (88/SCH/18/1); Eastbury National Primary, Lambourn (D/P79B/28/2); Bouverie Pusey School, Charney Bassett (C/EL41/2); St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Bracknell Church of England Mixed Primary School (C/EL45/3)

A Recreation Ground should be purchased and a Monument erected

Bracknell opted for a recreation ground as its war memorial.

BRACKNELL WAR MEMORIAL.

A public meeting was held in the Victoria Hall on March 14th, to receive the report of the Committee which was appointed to consider this matter. The Vicar was in the Chair. He presented the report of the Committee, which was to be the effect that a Recreation Ground should be purchased and a Monument erected, on which the names of those who have fallen, should be inscribed. On the motion of Vice Admiral Sir Dudley de Chair the Report was adopted, and steps were taken to arrange that a Committee should issue an appeal for Funds, and arrange for the carrying out of the scheme. A sum of from £1800 to £2000 will be required.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, April 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/4)

A worthy and permanent memorial of the men of Bracknell who have made the supreme sacrifice during the war

Bracknell considered the options for a memorial.

MEMORIAL TO THE MEN WHO HAVE FALLEN IN THE WAR.

A public meeting to consider what will be the best form of Memorial to those of our Parish who have fallen in the War was held in the Victorian Hall, on January 9th, with the Vicar in the chair. The following resolutions was passed:

1. That this meeting cordially approves the suggestion for a worthy and permanent memorial of the men of Bracknell who have made the supreme sacrifice during the war.

2. Om order to carry out the proposal the meeting elects a representative Committee of the inhabitants; this committee to appoint a Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer.

3. The terms of reference to the committee shall be:

(1.) to fully consider in all its bearings a proposal to establish a Cottage Hospital or Nursing Home in Bracknell.

(2.) Failing (1.) to consider the possibility of providing a Public Recreation Ground.

(3.) Failing (1.) and (2.) to consider other schemes that may be suggested.

The Committee to report at as early a date as possible.

A Committee was then appointed.

A desire was expressed by many of those present that the co-operation of some of the neighbouring parishes might be sought for.

It was also proposed to place a Memorial tablet in the Church.

The first meeting of the Committee was held on Jan. 17th, and was fully attended. The Vicar was appointed Chairman, Mr. Wilson, Secretary, and Mr. W.H. Hunton, Treasurer.

Two Sub-Committees were then appointed

(1) to consider in all its bearings the proposal to erect or acquire a Cottage Hospital or Nurses Home.

(2) To consider in a similar way the proposal to provide a recreation ground.

These Sub-Committees to report as soon as possible to the full Committee, who will then reconsider the whole question.

Bracknell section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/2)

“It is even yet difficult to realize that the war is over”

Bracknell was starting to come to terms with the end of the war.

It is even yet difficult to realize that the war is over, and though, thank God, the fighting is ended we must remember that, for a long time to come, we shall have to keep to the food regulations, and the coupon books, and practice economy and war saving in every possible way.

One more name has been added to the Roll of Honour, Sergt. Gordon Court, who was killed on November 4th, just a week before the Armistice was signed. He had much fighting in the earlier part of the War, and then after some time of service in England he went out again a few weeks ago. It seems likely that his will be the last name to be added from this Parish, to the gallant company of those who have laid down their lives in the great cause. Fifty-seven names are on our list of fallen. We hope that we shall be able to erect some permeant memorial which will worthily preserve their memory.

We congratulate Sergeant Percy Smith, of the R.A.M.C., on the Military Medal which has been awarded to him.

In common with the rest of the country we have been visited with the plague of influenza, and it has caused the death of several persons in Bracknell, and its immediate neighbourhood.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, December 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/10)

Peace was declared at 11am by the continual blowing of all Reading hooters followed by ringing of church bells

No one in Berkshire could miss the end of the war.

Earley

On Monday November 11 peace was declared at 11am by the continual blowing of all Reading hooters followed by ringing of church bells and a general half holiday. We have no peal of bells here, but we had a beautiful Thanksgiving Service at half past seven the same evening. The order of service was as follows; the National Anthem, a short address from the pulpit by the Vicar; a procession round the church with Milton’s hymn “let us with a gladsome mind” and “Now thank we all our God”; prayers and thanksgivings in front of the altar; “Gloria in Excelsis”; hymn by Mr Athelstan Riley “Ye watchers and ye holy ones”; the blessing. The whole service lasted 25 minutes. It was a damp, miserable evening but all hearts and spirits were full of thankfulness and rejoicings. The next morning a noticeable number of people communicated at 7.30.

Bracknell

November 11th will always be kept in remembrance as the day when the Armistice was signed which put an end to the fighting. The news was received in Bracknell about 11 o’clock, and spread rapidly far and near. Groups gathered together, discussing the news, and the street was soon gay with flags. A Thanksgiving Service was held in the church in the evening, which was attended be a large and representative gathering.

Never before have our hearts been so deeply stirred as they were when we sung our psalms and hymns and said our prayers of thanksgiving.

Earley St Bartholomew parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P192/28A/15); Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, December 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/10)

In view of the fruit shortage, it is very important this year that as many blackberries as possible should be picked

BLACKBERRY PICKING

In view of the fruit shortage, it is very important this year that as many blackberries as possible should be picked. Here is an opportunity for our children to do their bit, and we hope they will do their best. The blackberries should be taken to Miss Brown School House, by Mr. Yorke, and taken to Bracknell on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and 3d. per pint will be paid to the gatherers.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/8)

Glad to see them safe and well

There was mixed news of men from Bracknell.

We are very glad to welcome our Organist, Mr. Faulkner, home on leave, preparatory to his course of training for a commission. He has been able to be at his place at the Organ on the Sundays of August 11th and 18th.

Amongst others home on leave, are Charles Cheney, Harry Searle, Bert Braunston and Harry Hearne. The two latter have had a long time of service in the Berkshire Yeomanry, in Egypt and Palestine, and we are glad to see them safe and well.

Ernest Broadway is a Prisoner in Germany.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/8)

A prisoner in Germany

Sometimes it was a relief to hear a loved one hasd been captured.

Jonathan Rance, who was reported missing, is now known to be a prisoner in Germany.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, August 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/7)

Earnest supplication that the righteous cause for which we have made such heavy sacrifices may be speedily crowned with victory, and a just and lasting Peace come quickly.

Churches in the Bracknell area commemorated the fourth anniversry of the start of the war.

August

Ascot

SUNDAY, August 4th, will be the fourth anniversary of the Declaration of War, and special forms of Prayer and Thanksgiving will be used throughout the Country on that day. The hours of service at All Saints’ will be as usual.

Bracknell

THE WAR – On Sunday, August 4th, when we shall enter on the fifth year of the War, we are called to come together to seek for God’s help and guidance, and to offer our thanksgivings for the success that has been granted to our efforts. The services will be at the usual hours, but will be of a special character. It can hardly be necessary to urge that there should be a large attendance. We need God’s continued help, and we must seek for it by persistent prayer. The collections at all the services will be for the British Red Cross Society.

Warfield

On Sunday, August 4th, the fourth anniversary of the Declaration of War, there will be celebrations of the Holy Communion at 7, 8, and 12 o’clock. Morning Prayer and Intercession Service for Children at 3. Evening Prayer, Intercession, reading of the Roll of Honour, and Sermon at 6.30. May we, like the good king Hezekiah of old, go up unto the house of the Lord, at this great crisis in our nation’s life, and spread out our cause, our troubles and anxieties, national and personal before the Lord.

Winkfield

For the first time, the 4th of August, the anniversary of the beginning of the War falls on a Sunday. The government have decided against a week day commemoration, so that the whole nation, it is hoped, will observe the occasion as a day of National Intercession to God on behalf of our country, with earnest supplication that the righteous cause for which we have made such heavy sacrifices may be speedily crowned with victory, and a just and lasting Peace come quickly.

We earnestly hope that this parish will respond, as never before, and that no family will be unrepresented in this parish church on such an occasion, when, as our Prime Minister writes:

“It is fitting that the nation should remembering the services of the men who are fighting for the preservation of civilisation, and should once more reconsecrate itself to the high ideals for the attainment of which the Allied Nations have sacrificed so much”.

The names of all our men serving at the front will be read out and commended to God in prayer, and the offertories at all the services will be devoted to fund helping to send comforts to Winkfield men now prisoners of war in Germany.

September

Bracknell

THE WAR – The Services held in August 4th – the fourth anniversary of the commencement of the War – were well attended. There were many communicants, and the church was really full, both at 11 and 6.30. The special services were used, and seemed to strike the right nore, as the services were specially earnest and reverent. The good news of the Allies’ successes deepened the feeling of thankfulness and hope in all hearts. £21 18s. was collected for the Red Cross and Prisoners of War Fund.

Cranbourne

WAR ANNIVERSARY — The services on August 4th were well attended, especially in the evening. The collections were for the Prisoners of War Fund, and amounted to £11 10s. 6d.

Warfield

It was a great pleasure to see such splendid congregations and above all so many communicants, on Sunday, August 4th, the fourth anniversary of the Declaration of War. In the evening the body of the church was quite full, and the congregation joined most heartily and earnestly in the service. The collection £6 9s. 7d. was in aid of the parochial fund for providing parcels for prisoners of war, of which Mrs. Wood is secretary.

Winkfield

The services on August 4th were well attended, especially in the evening. The offertories for Prisoners of War amounted to £12 10s and on the following Sunday £7 was raised for the Mission to Seamen.


Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, August and September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/7-8)

Expecting to be called to work with the Church Army

A Bracknell clergyman wanted to work with the troops.

The Rev. E. Grant is expecting to be called to his work with the Church Army on July 1st, or soon after. If he does not receive his commission as an Army Chaplain he hopes to return to his work here in six months time.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

“There is much anxiety felt in several homes where the sons have not been heard of for some time”

More Bracknell men had fallen.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR

We have had to add four names to the list of those who have given their lives in the war.

George Matthews of the Royal Marines, Arthur Wilson, who was formerly one of our choir boys, Corporal S. Bowyer of the Royal West Surrey Regiment, and Charles Olyott, who was a choir man; his loss is deeply deplored, and he has left a wife and three little children. We greatly sympathise with those who have been bereaved. Mrs. Olyott has now lost two sons, and her third son is in Mesopotamia.

Others have been wounded, amongst them Private W.T. Atkins, who only recently went out to France, but we are glad to think his wound is not serious. There is also much anxiety felt in several homes where the sons have not been heard of for some time.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, May 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/5)

The lives of these PoWs seem to depend on the food sent them from England

PoWs depended on food sent from home.

Mrs. Barnett has undertaken to collect eggs for the Reading Branch of the National Egg Collection for Wounded Soldiers. Gifts of eggs will be gratefully received at the Vicarage.

The Vicar has had an appeal to help to collect for the Royal Berkshire Regiment Prisoners of War Fund on May 11th. 1918.

The Care Committee are responsible for sending parcels of food to 405 prisoners and bread to 473, the cost of which exceeds £14,000 per annum — £2000 of which is spent on bread. This is a very urgent matter as the lives of these men seem to depend on the food sent them from England. The Vicar will gladly receive donations, large and small, and if they are sent to him before May 11th he will forward them to the Committee as a gift from Bracknell.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, May 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/5)