“Right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style”

This supplement to the roll of honour’s bald list of names gives us more detail about the parish’s fallen heroes.

Supplement to the Wargrave Parish Magazine

ROLL OF HONOUR.
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of thy compassion: We remember before thee our brethren who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness of all our sins, and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself to us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

Baker, Edward
Private, 7th Wiltshire Regiment, killed in action on the Salonica Front, April 24th, 1917, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker. He was born at Wargrave and educated at the Piggott School. When the war commenced he was working as a grocer’s assistant in Wargrave. He volunteered in 1915 and was sent out in 1916. He was killed by a shell in a night charge.

Barker, Percy William

Private, 7th Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment/ Killed at Salonica, July 4th 1917, aged 19. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. William Barker at Yeldall Lodge. His father was for twenty years a gardener at Yeldall. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the village school. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. He was one of the most helpful lads on the Boys’ Committee of the Boys’ Club. He volunteered May 11th, 1916. On July 4th, 1917, he was hit by a piece of shell from enemy aircraft while bathing and died within an hour. The Chaplain wrote to his parents “Your loss is shared by the whole battalion”.

Bennett, William
Sergeant, 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in France, Dec 3rd, 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bennett, of Wargrave, and when the war broke out he was working on a farm. He volunteered at once. He was killed instantly by a shell. One of his officers wrote: “Sergt. Bennett was the best N.C.O. we had in the company. Fearless, hardworking, willing, he was a constant inspiration to his platoon. His splendid record must inevitably have led to his decoration. We have lost an invaluable N.C.O. and a fine man. He was buried with all possible reverence about half a mile from Eaucourt L’Abbaye”.

Boyton, Bertram
Lieut., 6th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds in Palestine, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 36. He was educated at King’s College, London, and was a Surveyor and Architect by profession. He was a Fellow of the Surveyors Institute and had won Gold and Silver Medals of the Society of Auctioneers by examination. He was married to Elsie, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Morris, at the Parish Church, Wargrave, Sept. 7th 1905, He was a member of the London Rowing Club and the Henley Sailing Club, and keenly interested in all athletics. He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company in April 1915. He was given a commission in the 6th London R.F.A., in July 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant soon after. He went to France with his battery in June 1916, and to Salonica in the following November. He was sent to Egypt and Palestine in June 1917, and was wounded while taking his battery into action in an advance on November 6th. He died at El Arish on November 9th, 1917.

Buckett, Ernest Frederick

Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action Sept. 20th, 1917, in France, aged 23. The dearly loved husband of Dorothy May Buckett, married May 31st, 1917. He was educated at the Henley National School, and before the War was a slaughterman with Messrs. O’Hara & Lee, butchers, Henley and Wargrave. In 1910 he joined the Berkshire Yeomanry (Territorial Force), and was called up on August 4th, 1914, at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in the spring of 1915. When he had completed his five years service, since the date of his enlistment, he volunteered for another year, but received his discharge as a time-expired man in January 1916. In July, 1916, he was called up under the new regulations and sent immediately to France where he remained, except for leave on the occasion of his marriage, until he fell in action, September 20th, 1917. (more…)

Khaki chit-chat

There was plenty of news of men belonging to a Congregational church in east Reading.

Khaki Chit-Chat.

Friends will be pleased to hear that Segt. Leslie Smith, who lies in hospital at Stourbridge, is now making very good progress. I believe I am right when I say that he received his wounds as far back as three months ago. The injury to his ankle has been proving rather seriously troublesome, and that, combined with the low state to which his general health sank, gave grave cause for anxiety about a month ago. Since then, however, bad news has turned to good, and good, which we hope will yet grow better.

Sergt. Gilbert Smith, his brother, arrived home last month on leave, to the joy of his family circle and his friends. We congratulate him upon looking so well, and trust that good fortune will continue with him.

We are sorry to hear through Mrs. Jordan that our caretaker has been in hospital recently with frost-bite. This is not altogether surprizing when one remembers that the weather in France where our men are is not one whit less severe than it is at home here. We are glad he is out of hospital again, and hope he will get the boots he needs. If he doesn’t, then we hope that next time he will be invalided home for a spell.

Sergt. Taylor, son of Mr. A Taylor, of Bishops Road, is at present in a hospital in Scotland, going through the slow process of recovering from shrapnel wounds. We sympathize with his home people and especially his wife, in their feeling that to be so far north means that he is just as much out of reach as he would have been had he been kept in France.

Mr. Taylor, of Talfourd Avenue, has been home on leave recently from Salonika. It was extremely unfortunate that he happened to be so unwell for a great part of his visit here. Better luck next time, or rather let us hope that when next he returns it will be for good.

Leslie Newey is “joining up” the 1st of March. We admire his eagerness to follow his brother’s steps, but hope for several reasons that he will be disappointed in his desire to get to France.

Mr. Goddard wrote from Bedford the other day a cheering and encouraging letter to the Sunday School, in he stated that he is taking a class in the Sunday School there. A man who can do that when he joins the army and leaves home is “keeping fit” in more senses than one.

Sergt. Jones, son-in-law of Mr. Lindsey, is in one of our local hospitals undergoing treatment for his right arm, we regret to say that the degree of future usefulness of this unfortunate limb is a matter of uncertainty. There is ground for hope, however, and we trust that the best possible will be eventually be realized.

We were glad to see Mr Planner and Mr. Clement Tregay looking so well during their recent visits home. Mr. Watkins has also been home recently on leave. The first and last of these are now “somewhere in France,” as is also Mr Thomas who, we hoped, was destined to stay in the old country.

Mr. T. Brown is at present enjoying the gentler climate of Lower Egypt.

Jess Prouten is still in Mesopotamia, and I believe would be glad to hear oftener from old Reading friends.

Old friends of Park will be pleased to hear of the visit of a certain man in khaki to the Institute the other day. He was an Australian on leave (Tom Vinicombe, an old scholar of the Sunday School), and he explained his appearance by saying that he thought he would like to have a look at the place where he had spent such happy times as a boy.

Recently our Week-night Services have been rather changing in their character. The subjects taken are matters of general interest and they are treated from the strictly Christian and spiritual point of view. Among those dealt with hitherto have been “The Local Controversy on Spiritualism,” “President Wilson’s Attitude and Ideals,” “The Work of British Women in France,” and “The Housing Problem in the Light of the War.”

Trinity Congregational Magazine, March 1917 (D/EX1237/1/12)

Too busy with amputation for frostbite to make bandages

The hardworking bandage makers of Wargrave were pleased to find their work was appreciated by its recipients.

Surgical Dressing Emergency Society: Wargrave

Some of the letters received:

No. 4 Clearing Station Dardanelles Army
Dear Madam,

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter and bales (9 bales) of Hospital Clothing and dressings with many thanks. Everything sent will be most useful out here.
A.W., Capt. R.A.M.C.

St ——– Hospital, Malta.
Dear Madam,

Would you kindly convey to your Committee and Branches how very much we appreciate the gift of 2 bales of dressings which arrived safely on Xmas Eve. They arrived at a time when we were so busy with amputation cases after frost bite, and have little or no time to cut or make dressings. Our very best thanks.
Believe me, yours gratefully, E.M. Matron.

Serbian Relief Fund
Dear Madam,

The parcels were called for (2 bales) and we beg to offer our very best thanks for the kind and generous gifts, which are most acceptable.
Yours truly, p.p. Mrs. Carrington White.

Croix Rouge Française
The London Committee of the Croix Rouge Française beg to acknowledge with sincere thanks having received from you 2 bales – they have been sent to Ambulance 116, Bataillon De Chasseurs à Pied Secteur Postal 179.

Chasseurs à Pied correspond with our Highlanders, men from the Highlands who fight in the mountains.

Another Hospital writes to say that a bale of comforts has not reached them. This is only the fourth bale that has not reached its destination. 18 bales have already been sent out this month. The 4th, 10th, 13th (Boulogne) and 24th British Ex. Force France General Hospitals, and the 2nd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station each got two bales, one of dressings and one of comforts, consisting mostly of pyjamas, flannel shirts and warm comforts.

The 5th, 10th and 14th Stationary Hospitals, British Ex. Force, France, and the 1st Canadian Stationary Hospital had 1 bale each containing comforts and dressings. 2 bales went to the Serbian Relief Fund, 2 bales to the French Red Cross.

The work of the Society is greatly increased since the dressings have been “Requisitioned”. But thanks to more help at home and the very excellent work of our Branches, we are going very well, and hope to be able to send an increased number of dressings and comforts to the Front.

Wargrave parish church magazine (D/P145/28A/31)

A fight for liberty and honour

The Winkfield parish magazine had news of local soldiers, and a report on the Christmas gifts sent out to the Front. It also took a look back at the lessons of history and the possible meaning for the present war.

We have heard with regret of the death in action of William Cartland, aged 21. He was severely wounded and died the same day.

William Cartland lived here until he enlisted in the Army about three years ago; he was confirmed in 1909, and was a communicant and member of our Guild. He will be deeply mourned by many friends in Winkfield who loved and respected him, and much sympathy is felt for Mrs. Cartland and family in their great loss.

Our wounded.
We welcome home Pte. Albert Carter for a brief rest and convalescence.

Pte. Charles Reed who left for the Front only a few weeks ago, is in hospital at Southampton with frost-bitten legs and rheumatic fever, but we rejoice to hear that he is already convalescent; also that Pte. Charles Lunn, who was wounded, is progressing well in hospital.

We much regret that no further news has been heard of Pte. Charles Streamer, who was reported wounded. It was thought that he was in hospital in England, but the War Office can give no news of his whereabouts, and much sympathy is felt for his relatives in their great anxiety.

We were delighted to see at the beginning of the month Cecil Hayes-Sadler who obtained a few days well earned leave from the Front after some months of most useful and hazardous work as a despatch rider. Mr. Hayes-Sadler has the honour of being the first of our Winkfield Volunteers to get out to the Front.

‘15

In the days when Britannia’s rule of the waves was being established, “the Fifteen” was a common phrase in England to describe the attempt of the “Old Pretender” to regain the crown which his father James II., lost by interfering with the liberties of the English people. A. D. 1715 was the date of that attempt. Few of us, in the present time of trouble, are likely to forget another “Fifteen,” when on June 18th, 1815, 22,000 British Soldiers with a mixed force of 45,000 allied troops withstood 80,000 French veterans on the field of Waterloo. That, too, was a fight for liberty and honour. But the greatest “Fifteen” of all was seven hundred years ago. John, King of England and France had made one of the many attempts of the Norman Kings to destroy the customs and freedom of the English over whom he ruled. At the Island of Running-mead in the Thames Valley, on June 19th, 1215 he was brought to book, signing the Magna Charta, which has since become the charter of freedom not only in England but of the whole civilised world. Again and again John’s successors have tried to revoke that charter – again and again they have been brought to book. At last England grew tired of the incessant struggle and banished the last to break the peace of the realm (James II.). This settled the question, perhaps for ever. Is it too much to hope that out of 1915 may come a similar judgement on rulers who break the peace of Europe?

SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ CHRISTMAS PRESENT SCHEME.

This has now reached a satisfactory conclusion, and 51 parcels have been dispatched. The following warm things were sent out : 24 undervests, 22 pairs of gloves, 8 pairs of socks, 9 helmets, 2 mufflers, 7 mittens, 2 knitted purses, 1 belt, 4 dozen khaki handkerchiefs, 4 air cushions, 2 other presents; and each parcel contained also such items as these: cigarettes, matches, candles, chocolate, soap, string, writing paper, safety pins, a “first aid” to French, and cough lozenges.

Miss Montgomerie wishes to thank all those who helped to bring this undertaking to a satisfactory issue, especially Mrs. Brant and Miss. Jenden, both of whom have given most kind assistance.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District MonthlyMagazine, January 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/1)

Awful journey to see frostbitten husband

The Christmas celebrations at Bisham Abbey were over quickly. Florence Vansittart Neale was struck by a woman’s desperate journey to reach her wounded husband. (Despite his French name, Etienne Boileau was British born.)

26 December 1914

Farrers came, took down Xmas tree….

Etienne Boileau wounded. Frostbitten feet. His wife awful journey to Boulogne in search of him. In London after all.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale (D/EX73/3/17/8)