“Right in front of the battalion, leading his men in true British style”

This supplement to the roll of honour’s bald list of names gives us more detail about the parish’s fallen heroes.

Supplement to the Wargrave Parish Magazine

ROLL OF HONOUR.
R.I.P.

Almighty and everlasting God, unto whom no prayer is ever made without hope of thy compassion: We remember before thee our brethren who have laid down their lives in the cause wherein their King and country sent them. Grant that they, who have readily obeyed the call of those to whom thou hast given authority on earth, may be accounted worthy among thy faithful servants in the kingdom of heaven; and give both to them and to us forgiveness of all our sins, and an ever increasing understanding of thy will; for his sake who loved us and gave himself to us, thy Son our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.

Baker, Edward
Private, 7th Wiltshire Regiment, killed in action on the Salonica Front, April 24th, 1917, aged 21. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker. He was born at Wargrave and educated at the Piggott School. When the war commenced he was working as a grocer’s assistant in Wargrave. He volunteered in 1915 and was sent out in 1916. He was killed by a shell in a night charge.

Barker, Percy William

Private, 7th Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment/ Killed at Salonica, July 4th 1917, aged 19. He was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. William Barker at Yeldall Lodge. His father was for twenty years a gardener at Yeldall. He was born at Crazies Hill and educated at the village school. On leaving school he began work as a gardener. He was one of the most helpful lads on the Boys’ Committee of the Boys’ Club. He volunteered May 11th, 1916. On July 4th, 1917, he was hit by a piece of shell from enemy aircraft while bathing and died within an hour. The Chaplain wrote to his parents “Your loss is shared by the whole battalion”.

Bennett, William
Sergeant, 8th Royal Berkshire Regiment, killed in France, Dec 3rd, 1916 aged 25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bennett, of Wargrave, and when the war broke out he was working on a farm. He volunteered at once. He was killed instantly by a shell. One of his officers wrote: “Sergt. Bennett was the best N.C.O. we had in the company. Fearless, hardworking, willing, he was a constant inspiration to his platoon. His splendid record must inevitably have led to his decoration. We have lost an invaluable N.C.O. and a fine man. He was buried with all possible reverence about half a mile from Eaucourt L’Abbaye”.

Boyton, Bertram
Lieut., 6th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds in Palestine, Nov. 9th, 1917, aged 36. He was educated at King’s College, London, and was a Surveyor and Architect by profession. He was a Fellow of the Surveyors Institute and had won Gold and Silver Medals of the Society of Auctioneers by examination. He was married to Elsie, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Morris, at the Parish Church, Wargrave, Sept. 7th 1905, He was a member of the London Rowing Club and the Henley Sailing Club, and keenly interested in all athletics. He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company in April 1915. He was given a commission in the 6th London R.F.A., in July 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant soon after. He went to France with his battery in June 1916, and to Salonica in the following November. He was sent to Egypt and Palestine in June 1917, and was wounded while taking his battery into action in an advance on November 6th. He died at El Arish on November 9th, 1917.

Buckett, Ernest Frederick

Private in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action Sept. 20th, 1917, in France, aged 23. The dearly loved husband of Dorothy May Buckett, married May 31st, 1917. He was educated at the Henley National School, and before the War was a slaughterman with Messrs. O’Hara & Lee, butchers, Henley and Wargrave. In 1910 he joined the Berkshire Yeomanry (Territorial Force), and was called up on August 4th, 1914, at the commencement of the war. He immediately volunteered for foreign service. He went to France in the spring of 1915. When he had completed his five years service, since the date of his enlistment, he volunteered for another year, but received his discharge as a time-expired man in January 1916. In July, 1916, he was called up under the new regulations and sent immediately to France where he remained, except for leave on the occasion of his marriage, until he fell in action, September 20th, 1917. (more…)

Advertisements

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

“His splendid bravery inspired all troops in the vicinity to rise for the occasion”

An experienced officer who in peacetime had worked managing a Wargrave estate was one of the few to be honoured with the Victoria Cross for his great courage. Oliver Spencer Watson (1876-1918) is buried in France.

The Late Lieut.-Col. O. C. Spencer Watson, V.C.

A supplement to the “London Gazette” of May 8th gave the following particulars respecting the award of the V.C. to Lieut.-Col. O. C. Spencer Watson, D.S.O. (Reserve of Officers), late King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry:

“For most conspicuous bravery, self-sacrificing devotion to duty during a critical period of operations. His command was at a point where continual attacks were made by the enemy in order to pierce the line, and an intricate system of old trenches in front, coupled with the fact that his position was under constant rifle and machine gun fire, rendered the situation more dangerous. A counter attack had been made against the enemy position, which at first achieved its object, but as they were holding out in two impoverished points Lieut.-Col. Watson saw that immediate action was necessary, and he let his remaining small reserve to the attack, organising bombing parties and leading attacks under intense rifle and machine gun fire.

Outnumbered, he finally ordered his men to retire, remaining himself in a communication trench to cover the retirement, though he faced almost certain death by so doing. The assault he led was at a critical moment, and without doubt saved the line. Both in the assault and in covering his men’s retirement he held his life as nothing, and his splendid bravery inspired all troops in the vicinity to rise for the occasion and save a breach being made in a hardly tried and attenuated line. Lieut.-Col. Watson was killed while covering the withdrawal.”

“The Times” of May 11th gave the following particulars, respecting Lieut.-Col. Watson: –

He was the youngest son of the late W. Spencer Watson, F.R.C.S., and was educated at St Paul’s and passed into the Army from Sandhurst, being gazetted to the Yorks Light Infantry in 1897. He was invalided in 1904, after taking part in the Tirah campaign 1897-1898, in which he was dangerously wounded, and in the China campaign of 1900, receiving the medal for each of these campaigns, in the first case with two clasps.

In 1910 he joined a Yeomanry regiment, and on the outbreak of war went with them to Egypt as captain and took part in the fighting on the Gallipoli Peninsula. Promoted major, he came home to join a battalion of the Y.O.Y.L.I., going with them to France early in 1917. In May of that year he was dangerously wounded at Bullecourt, and received D.S.O. for gallantry and leadership.

He returned to the front last January, although he had not recovered from the effect of his wound; was shortly afterwards promoted lieut-colonel, and was killed in action on March 28th. Lieut-Colonel Watson was a keen sportsman, and was known locally as a good cricketer, boatman, and footballer, as well as a straight rider to hounds. Up to the time that he joined the forces in the present conflict he had been the estate agent to Sir Charles Henry, Bart., M.P., at Parkwood, and managed the Farm at Crazies Hill.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Well known local ladies raise funds

A big bazaar was held in Wargrave in aid of war charities.

June
A War Time Bazaar

A bazaar will be held on Saturday, June 23rd, at Ferry Lodge, Wargrave. The proceeds will be divided between the St. Dunstans Hostel for Blinded Sailors and Soldiers and the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund.

Many Ladies well-known in the neighbourhood are taking a great deal of trouble to make the Bazaar a success.

Quite a novel feature will be introduced in using different rooms at Ferry Lodge, in which the particular things appropriate to the rooms will be sold. These will include a bedroom, kitchen, drawing room, river room, etc.

Joyce’s well-known band has been engaged to play by the river, and there will be cocoanut shies, clock golf and other amusements.

The entrance has been fixed at 1/- from 3 to 6.30 p.m. and at 6d. from 8 to 10 p.m. people coming by river can moor their boats at the Ferry Lodge landing stage.

July
The Bazaar

On Saturday, June 23rd, a Bazaar was held at Ferry Lodge, and Mrs. Maxwell Hicks and her helpers are to be most sincerely congratulated upon the excellent result attained. The object was to raise funds for St. Dunstan’s Hostel, Lord Roberts Memorial Fund and Local Wargrave Charities. All these will benefit most materially, as about £600 was realised.

Lady Henry very kindly came to open the sale.

Wargrave parish magazine, June-July 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

“The children are like soldiers”

The Wargrave parish magazine’s account of a children’s entertainment is full of war allusions.

Sir Charles Henry gave a treat to the School Children on Thursday, December 21st. It was very kind of Sir Charles and it would be difficult for him to realize how much pleasure it gave the children and all concerned.

The Teachers arranged a programme which was gone through in the spirit it deserved – the audience in no way lacking appreciation. Indeed, the children are like soldiers and the entertainments they enjoy are those in which they entertain themselves. That the tea was thoroughly enjoyed no one could doubt. Like the present Cabinet “quick decisions” seemed the order of the day in the matter of buns and cakes. Peace was not declared till the buns were as scarce as we hope the Huns will soon be.

Previous to the singing of “God save the King,” which terminated the proceedings, cheers were given for Sir Charles Henry, the three teachers, and all those who contributed towards the enjoyment of the evening.

Wargrave parish magazine, January 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Two sons lost within one year

A number of men from the village of Crazies Hill had been killed, but there was happier news for one family, whose son had been awarded a medal for heroism.

Crazies Hill Notes

Much sympathy is felt for Mr. and Mrs. Light who have lost two sons in the war. Harry, 2nd Royal Berks was killed in action on September 25th of last year, and James Henry, 2/ 4th Oxon and Bucks, was killed in action on August 21st this year.

This double loss, coming in the course of one year, has evoked the deepest sympathy for the family. We trust they will be comforted in this thought and be supported and helped by our prayers for those in bereavement or sorrow.

Much sympathy is also felt for Mrs. Morse whose husband was killed in action on July 27th last.

In addition to those on our list of those who have given their lives for their country, and whom we remember before God at our Intercession Services are the names of Thomas Barrett, Ernest Edwards, Fred Eggerton, William Gray, Cyril Henry, Albert Nicholls, and Frank Silver.

We are pleased to state that since our last issue Lance- Corporal Herbert Richard Plested of the 1st Royal Berks. Regt. has received the Military Medal.

Wargrave parish magazine, October 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

“We shall miss the soldiers”

Sir Charles Henry (1860-1919) was a wealthy Jewish Australian businessman and former MP who lived at Parkwood [later Cayton Park] in Crazies Hill, although he was MP for a Shropshire constituency. His only son was killed at the Battle of Loos in 1915.

Crazies Hill Notes

Park Auxiliary Military Hospital has been closed.

The last of the patients left on the 20th. For about the past eighteen months, through the kindness and generosity of Sir Charles Henry, the Hospital has looked after a very considerable number of patients. It has always been full. We shall miss the soldiers. Their cheerfulness; their good humour; their sense of humour; their kindness one toward another is something which will always be remembered by us at Crazies Hill.

Wargrave parish magazine, November 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

A gallant example: the first war memorial

Wargrave parish church was reopened after restoration following a 1914 fire (believed to have been set by suffragettes) on 23 July 1916. It incorporated what may be the first general war memorial for WWI.

The Roll of Honour

In all the beautiful service of Consecration, on Saturday, July 22nd, there was no more touching prayer than that in dedication of the East Window:-

Bishop
In the faith of Jesus Christ we dedicate this Window to the glory of God and in memory of those who having gone forth from this place have laid down or shall have laid down their lives in this war, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Vicar
Her light was like unto a stone most precious.

People Even like a jasper stone, clear as crystal.

When we look at the window our hearts are uplifted in the faith that those who suffer with Christ shall also reign with Him in Glory. And we may remember before God the names of those who have given their lives for us: A Roll which has been sadly increased in this last month.

William Francis Perry. Oct. 25th, 1914.
Louis Richardson. May 16th, 1915.
Harry Light. Sept. 25th, 1915.
Cyril Henry. Sept. 26th, 1915.
Sam Sharp. April 11th, 1916.
Albert Nicholls. April 22nd, 1916.
Sidney Jennings. May 15th, 1916.
Herbert Doughty. May 31st, 1916.
Frank Silver. June 20th, 1916.
Cyril Edward Cook. July 8th, 1916.
Eric Arthur Smith. July 22nd, 1916.
William Larkin. July 23rd, 1916.
George Morse. July 27th, 1916.
Norris Heatley Nobie. Aug. 15th, 1916.
James Henry Light. Aug. 22nd, 1916.

We thank God for the gallant example of their lives and we pray God that He may comfort the hearts of those who mourn.

Wargrave parish magazine, September1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Social Evening for Wargrave’s wounded soldiers

Wounded soldiers recovering in the Wargrave area were invited to a social evening including cards and refreshments.

Social Evening

The Wargrave Tennis Club arranged a most successful Social Evening on February 16th in the Woodclyffe Hall, when over 130 guests were present including most of the wounded soldiers from the V.A.D. Hospital in Wargrave and Sir Charles Henry’s Hospital at Crazies Hill. In the Whist Drive the prize winners were:- Ladies, 1st Miss Pilworth, 2nd Miss Hayes, Mystery, Miss Blackwall, and Consolation, Mrs. H. Barker. Gentlemen:- 1st, Trooper Foster, 2nd, Mr. W. Hunt, Mystery Sergeant Fawcett, Consolation, Mr. W. Hope. The prizes were kindly provided by Mrs. Hinton, Mrs. Pennell (Lawrence Waltham) and Mrs. Ward (Osterley Park). The Committee were able to hand over a sum of three guineas to the V.A.D. Hospital authorities. The catering for refreshments was most capably superintended by Mrs. Hanson.

Wargrave parish church magazine, March 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Convalescent soldiers take over the Woodclyffe Home

In Crazies Hill an existing Convalescent Home was turned into a small hospital for the wounded, as the village mourned one of its own who had fallen, and was concerned also for another man severely wounded. The home was the newly opened Woodclyffe Home, whose donor Harriette Cooke Smith had intended it for ladies of small means.

Crazies Hill Notes

Owing to the kindness of Sir Charles Henry, the “Home” here has been turned into a hospital for the wounded. We have at present about 10 wounded men from different parts of the Front, and although their wounds have been serious we are glad to find that they are now in the advanced stages of convalescence, and able to enjoy the beautiful grounds and garden, by which the Home is surrounded. The authorities, I am given to understand, expressed such pleasure with all the arrangements when they inspected them, that Sir Charles in his generous manner has consented to add another building to the hospital, so as to provide room for more beds. The building, which is a neat wooden structure, fitted with electric light, is already nearing completion, so very shortly we expect an increase in the number of wounded soldiers among us.

It is with sincere regret that we record the sad news, that Sergeant William Gray was killed in the trenches, and our deepest sympathy goes out to Mrs. Gray in her sad bereavement.

Private Arthur Goodwin of the 1st Royal Berks Regiment has, we regret to say, been seriously wounded and is at present in Whitechapel Hospital, London.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

Wargrave’s roll of honour

Wargrave was one of many parishes to publish a list of men serving in the parish magazine. This allowed parishioners at home to pray for them all by name.

‘The Roll of Honor for the Parish of Wargrave

The Royal Navy
Bywater, Darol. Lieut. R.N.D
Grey, Thomas Robinson. Sub-Lieut., R.N.A.A.V.C.
Blackburn, Ernest. H.M.S. Glory
Bucker, J. H.M.S. Laurel
Carr, Joseph, Fireman. Transport
Clarke, William. H.M.S. Laconia
Coleman, Charles William. H.M.S. Glasgow
Doughty, Albert. H.M.S. Irresistible
Doughty, Arthur. H.M.S. Tartar
Doughty, Herbert. H.M.S. Queen Mary
Doughty, Horace. H.M.S. Donegal
Doughty, John. H.M.S. Hindustan
George, Walter. H.M.S. Agamemnon
Haskett, Bernard. H.M.S. Jason
Haycock, Charles William. H.M.S. Ajax
Hollis, Alfred John. H.M.S. Implacable
Jemmett, Leonard Oakley. H.M.S. Galatea
Mayne, Frederick. H.M.S. Britannia
Parritt, Edward. H.M.S. Defiance
Pauline, Leonard. H.M.S. Hebe
Payne, William. H.M.S. Britannia
Pugh, Charles. H.M.S. Hibernia
Sandleford, James. H.M.S. Mars
Waldron, Jesse. H.M.S. George V.
Waldron, William. H.M.S. Dido

George, William. Royal Marines, H.M.S. Agamemnon
Pugh, Herbert. Royal Marines, H.M.S. Prince George
(more…)

A most welcome gift of vegetables aboard ship

Our friend Florence Vansittart Neale was heavily involved in getting hold of fresh vegetables for the Royal Navy. Here we see one parish’s response, when they abandoned their usual horticultural show in favour of donating their best crops to hungry sailors.

At the meeting of the Wargrave and Knowl Hill Horticultural Society held in January, it was decided that owing to the War the Annual Show would not be held. A letter was read from the Vegetable Products Committee asking for vegetables for the Fleet. The Hon. Secretary was asked to organise the sending of some hampers. In answer to her appeal hampers have been forwarded to the naval base from Miss. Choatem, Mrs. Young, Rev. H. Wells, Mrs. Groves, Mrs. Rhodes, Major Bulkley D.S.O., A. E. Huggins, Esq., J. Shepherd, Esq., W. E. Cain, Esq., Sir Charles Henry, Bart., Mrs. Nicholl and Mrs. O. Young.

That the vegetables have been greatly appreciated is evidenced by the following letter received by Mrs. Oliver Young.

14, Mess, H.M.S. Hecla,
c/o G.P.O.
27/1/14
Madam,

I am writing to thank you for your most welcome present of vegetables. It has never been an easy matter, even in peace time, to get a sufficiency of such things and so I leave to guess how much we appreciate your thoughtfulness.

My mess-mates join their thanks with mine and wish you all the good things imaginable in return for your kindness.

Yours sincerely,
R. Larcombe

Mrs Oliver Young will be very glad if those who are not able to send a complete hamper will send her contributions of vegetables on Tuesdays in March as she can make them up and dispatch consignments.

Wargrave parish magazine, March 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)