One of the chief peace victories is to be gained by thrift

War Savings Association

Victory Week was a momentous one in the Association as the sum of £21 12s 4d subscribed brought the total subscriptions since November, 1916, to £1,009 19s 5d. This almost doubles the total quoted last December and is a sign that some at least realise that one of the chief peace victories is to be gained by thrift. Miss Johnston has kindly undertaken to carry on the work of secretary as the Association merges into the peace scheme for national savings.

Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1919 (D/EX1675/6/2/2)

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A superb investment

The country was still paying for the war.

Hare Hatch Notes: The Victory Loan

The object of the loan is to place our Country’s finance on a firm foundation. It has a claim hardly less imperious that that of any loan in the last four years. Even the small investor has his chance, by purchasing a war savings certificate, which costs the holder 15/-. H. C. Bond, Esq., generously adds 6d. to each certificate up to 25. In ten years time 26/- is paid for the 15/6 certificate. This is a superb investment. By means of the coupons small sums can be paid weekly as well as larger sums. We strongly advise our readers to save their money and invest it in war savings certificates. Mr. Chenery will gladly give any information that may be desired.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Takings for Victory Loan Week

Children were still collecting money for war related purposes.

Priestwood
8/07/2019

A half-holiday given this afternoon by chairman of the managers in recognition of the children’s effort at a special war savings collection. (£23.50)

Boyne Hill
July 8th

Total takings for Victory Loan Week amount to £21.17.7.

Log books of Priestwood Council Infant School (C/EL70); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

“Our War Savings Association has held its last meeting”

A War Savngs Association closed.

Our War Savings Association at the Parish Room held its last meeting on March 31st, 1919. We commenced on February 26th, 1917. The membership was not so large as it might have been, owing no doubt to being late in the field, as several institutions in the town had been started. Those members who took advantage of it, however, saved consistently, and the final account, passed by the auditors, showed at that date that there were 25 members still actually saving. During the period the Association was in existence nearly 7000 6d coupons were affixed to Savings Cards for members; 206 15/6 War Savings Certificates were exchanged for members’ completed cards, and 218 Certificates were purchased outright by single payments, making a total amount saved of £328 12s 0d. only £4 14s 6d was withdrawn during the whole period. Any of the members who still wish to save can do so by means of special 6d stamps, to be obtained at the Post Office, who will also supply a card for the same. When 15/6 has been saved in this way, it will be exchanged for a Certificate at any Post Office.

Newbury parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P89/28A/14)

“It has helped in a small way a great patriotic movement”

Time had come for one War Savings Associaton to fold.

ST JOHN’S PARISH WAR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

There being now so few members paying in, it is proposed to make a change by asking those few remaining members to join with the GFS Association…

Our St John’s Parish Association has been in existence nearly two years. It was affiliated to the Reading Centre on 7th March 1917, though it did not begin working till a month later.

In that period 127 Single Payment Certificates and 50 by instalment payments have been issued at a cost of £137 3s 6d, with withdrawals amounted to 18/-, leaving a balance in hand in Certificates and Cash of £2 18s 0d.

The total number who joined was 42, but only 6 are now paying-in members.

The represents, of course, only a small part of the support given to the War Savings effort in the parish. The Association was started late, so that the schools and other Associations absorbed the larger amount of the savings, but it has helped in a small way a great patriotic movement.

Reading St. John parish magazine, March 1919 (D/P172/28A/24)

Money will no longer be needed for carrying on the war, but it is needed as much as ever for winding it up

The war might be over, but it still had to be paid for.

“War Savings”

Although we may hope that money will no longer be needed for carrying on the war, we are assured that it is needed as much as ever for winding it up. And the “Guns Week” will take place just the same, under the happier name of “Thanksgiving Week”. A gun has been promised to be lent for the week 17th to 24th February, during which time it will visit the principal centres in the District of their Local Committee, so that country folk may see a specimen of the weapon that has helped to give us victory. Meanwhile, we are also promised the loan of some excellent lantern slides, illustrating various features of the war, with explanatory lectures. Notices will be given in the usual way.

Burghfield parish magazine, December 1918 (D/EX725/4)

Interesting lectures to stimulate the “War Saving” campaign

A series of illustrated lectures showed people at home something of what the war had been like.

February

An interesting lecture on the war, accompanied with lantern views, was given at the Schools on Thursday, January 9th. The object of the lecture was to stimulate the “War Saving” campaign in the neighbourhood. The lecture was well worth attending, but it appears that there were many who did not know that it was to be given.

A second lecture is fixed for February 6th. The subject will be illustrated by lantern pictures on the war in Italy.

A Thanksgiving week is to be held from February 17th to 22nd, and it is hoped that as large an investment as possible will be made in War Savings Certificates during that week. On Tuesday, February 18th, a Gun will travel over Burghfield Common and Sulhamstead during the morning, and War Savings Certificates will be sold during the stay of the Gun in the parish.

March

PEACE AND THANKSGIVING CAMPAIGN

The second Lecture was given in the School on February 6th. The Lecture was not as announced, on “Italy”, but on the “War at Sea”. The views exhibited were very fine, and the attendance was good.
The next Lecture will be on “War in Italy”, and will be given, accompanied by Lantern Views, in the Ufton Schoolroom, on March 6th.

Sulhamstead parish magazines, February-March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Influenza forbids

Money still needed to be raised for meeting the costs of the war.

War Savings

On 5th February there was another Lantern Lecture, “The War on Land”, this time at the Jubilee Room. The Rector, Mr Anderson, and Mr Lousley, all spoke on the importance of saving. There was to have been another Lecture, this week, but influenza forbids.

Burghfield parish magazine, March 1919 (D/EX725/4)

The War Savings Organisation throughout the country should be continued as a permanent part of our national machinery

It was hoped that savers would continue in the habit adopted to help the war effort.

War Savings Certificates

It is the earnest desire of the Government that the War Savings Organisation throughout the country should be continued as a permanent part of our national machinery.

The War Savings’ Organisation now comprises 1,830 Local War Savings’ Committees, which, for propaganda and organizing purposes, cover practically the whole country; 41,500 War Savings Associations for the co-operative purchase of War Savings’ Certificates; and 14,000 Official agencies for the sale of Certificates and War Savings’ Stamps. Altogether there are to-day nearly 200,000 voluntary workers engaged in administrative work connected with the movement. The figures do not include units working under the Scottish Committees.

The development of the habit of saving has been one of the most marked features of War Conditions in this country, as is evidenced by the fact that the number of holdings of Government Securities has increased from 345,100 on the opening of hostilities to over 17,000,000 to-day. In order still further to encourage this habit, it has been decided that, subject to the necessary legislation being obtained, holders of War Savings’ Certificates shall, on the maturity of those Certificates, have the right to extend their term for a further period of five years, in which case they will increase in value at the rate of 1d. per month until the end of this second period of five years, when a bonus of 1/- will be added. The value of the Certificate purchased for 15/6 becomes £1 at the end of five years and 26/- at the end of ten years, and during the whole period of ten years the Certificates can at any time be cashed. This right of extension attaches to all Certificates already issued and, until notice of its withdrawal is given, to those issued in the future.

Wargrave parish magazine, January 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

Still continuing the War Savings Association work

War savings work continued.

January 15th 1919

Am still continuing the War Savings Association work.

The accounts for the period April-Dec. 31 have been audited and certified correct.

The amount of £101. 13. 6 has been paid in by the children.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p. 456)

War echoes

The war was over but not forgotten.

WAR ECHOES

Honours and Promotions

Temporary Captain G H B Chance (MGC) to be Temporary Major (November). Harry D West (RGA) is Farrier Sergeant Major (date unknown).

Casualty

Private William West (MGC), died in France (of broncho-pneumonia).

Repatriation

Private F J Painter (5th Royal Berks)

Christmas Parcels

In view of the difficulties both of obtaining things to send, and of ascertaining correct addresses, and also in consideration of the fact that hostilities are suspended, Mr Willink has made no arrangements for sending parcels this season to sailors and soldiers. They may be sure, however, that they are not forgotten by all at home.

The Influenza

This epidemic, which has amounted to a veritable plague, seems to be abating in this country. We are told that throughout the world it has directly, or by after-effects, caused over 6 million deaths, more than the number reported from action of this war of 4 ½ years.

WAR SAVINGS

Peace and Thanksgiving Campaign

The war may be practically over, but money is still urgently required for a time. The National War Savings Committee have been called on by the Government to make one more big effort during the period ending with next autumn. Berkshire’s share is assessed at £900,000, of which our Bradfield Local Committee are asked to raise £50,000. with this object, Lantern Lectures, with excellent slides, will be given in each Association’s area from January to April. The present arrangements for Burghfield are:

January 8th War on Land
February 5th War in Italy
March 5th War at Sea
April 2nd War in the Holy Land

The first and third will be at the Handicraft Room, Mrs Bland’s School; the second and fourth in the Jubilee Room or the C of E School, 7 o’clock in all cases.

The Committee hope that readers of the magazine will make these facts known, and do their best to see that the campaign is a success.

A Burghfield War Memorial

It is, perhaps, too soon to begin public consultation of this matter. But it is not too soon to begin thinking about it. Probably we are all agreed that there should be some visible memorial of this Great War to keep alive the recollection of the working part playing in it by Burghfield men.

Burghfield parish magazine, January 1919 (D/EX725/4)

A red letter day

Aston Tirrold
20th December 1918

In commemoration of the signing of the armistice, a lady in the village, Mrs Moon, gave the school children a tea followed by a conjuring entertainment. Needless to say it was a red-letter day in our little community. Later on in the evening (7.30) under the auspices of the local War Savings associations, a Lantern lecture was given by Dr Smith.

Speenhamland
Dec 20

Visit of Edward Tuck of the Royal Navy.

Ascot Heath
December 20th 1918

School closed (a.m.) for the Xmas Holidays. An Entertainment was given to the Children this afternoon by the Managers to mark in some way the end of actual Hostilities.

Log books of Aston Tirrold CE School (C/EL105/1); St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Ascot Heath Boys’ School (C/EL110/4)

Worthy of the wonderful lives that had been laid down

Schoolgirls at Clewer were asked to think about the post-war world and their place in it.

Sale of Work for the Building Fund

The great event of the end of the Christmas term [1918] was the Sale for which we had been working so long…

The epidemic of influenza in the neighbourhood threatened us with long postponement, but having so much to see for Christmas we determined to carry on if possible…

The Hon. Mrs Alington, the wife of the Headmaster of Eton, had kindly promised to open the Sale… It was impossible to meet together just then without looking forward a little. They had to ask over and over again how they were going to prove themselves worthy of the great sacrifices that had been made and ask themselves again and again were they really worthy of the wonderful lives that had been laid down. In promoting the cause of education and building up for the future they were carrying on the great work that had been done during the past four years. She would just like to remind them of two poems, one of which had been frequently quoted during the last few years, but which brought strongly before them what they thought:

“What have I done for thee, England my England,
What is there I would not do, England my own.”

They had got to ask themselves how they were going to be worthy of this country which had been saved for them. The second quotation the speaker read was as hereunder:

“I will not cease from mental strife,
Nor see the sword sleep in my hand
Till I have built Jerusalem
In England’s green and pleasant land.”

The sword had been held up for them to do their utmost to build Jerusalem in our green and pleasant land…

The grand total … came to over £140. The expenses were small, and over £130 was paid into the War Savings Association in which the School “Improvement Fund” now holds more than 420 certificates.

Clewer: St Stephen’s High School Magazine, 1919 (D/EX1675/6/2/2)

War savings to date

Dec: 17th

Total War Savings to date amount to £659.4.6.

Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

“It is even yet difficult to realize that the war is over”

Bracknell was starting to come to terms with the end of the war.

It is even yet difficult to realize that the war is over, and though, thank God, the fighting is ended we must remember that, for a long time to come, we shall have to keep to the food regulations, and the coupon books, and practice economy and war saving in every possible way.

One more name has been added to the Roll of Honour, Sergt. Gordon Court, who was killed on November 4th, just a week before the Armistice was signed. He had much fighting in the earlier part of the War, and then after some time of service in England he went out again a few weeks ago. It seems likely that his will be the last name to be added from this Parish, to the gallant company of those who have laid down their lives in the great cause. Fifty-seven names are on our list of fallen. We hope that we shall be able to erect some permeant memorial which will worthily preserve their memory.

We congratulate Sergeant Percy Smith, of the R.A.M.C., on the Military Medal which has been awarded to him.

In common with the rest of the country we have been visited with the plague of influenza, and it has caused the death of several persons in Bracknell, and its immediate neighbourhood.

Bracknell section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, December 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/10)