Sacks of waste paper

Winkfield people collected waste paper and grew potatoes for the nation.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION.

The Secretary of the War Savings Association reports that we have now 57 members, and 19 War Savings Certificates have been bought. As the Association was only started in the first week in April we may hope that it will not be long before the membership will increase to three figures.

Several sacks have already been filled with waste paper and we hope soon to hear of the filling of many others.

The holders of the new allotments at Winkfield Row have been working very hard, and with favourable weather should reap a good reward. The Government recommend that this year all potatoes should be sprayed to guard against disease, and the Committee hope to be able to arrange for the hiring of a portable spraying machine for use in the parish.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/6)

Useful work

The War Savings Association at Cookham Dean School had started a little too late to attract all potential local members.

The War Savings Association, under the care of Miss Lomas, is doing useful work, though the number of contributors is not very large. The fact is that several of the children and others were already making use of the Post Office for the same purpose. Payments are received at the School, on Tuesdays, at 4 p.m.

Cookham Dean parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P43B/28A/11)

Help to hasten the arrival of a victorious peace!

Maidenhead people were asked to support the troops in prayer and with their savings.

Vicar’s Letter

Dear Friends and Parishioners,

… Our new War Shrine (temporary) is now erected in the Church. I hope many who pass by will enter to say a prayer from time to time in that quiet corner, for those in danger for our sakes, or to honour the memory of our gallant dead. If anyone would like to give a desk or rail to kneel against, they should communicate with Mr. Hazeldine, 5, College Rise, the hon. sec. of the C.E.M.S., the Society to whose generosity the Shrine is mainly due, or with myself as Vicar…

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar

C.E.M. FRY


St Luke’s War Saving Association

Miss Garratt, hon. sec., attends at the National School, East Street, from 7 to 8 p.m. every Monday, to receive deposits of 6d. and upwards to buy War Saving Certificates. Come in numbers, and help to hasten the arrival of a victorious peace!

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P181/28A/26)

Cancelling the Sunday School tea is helping their country to some small extent

Food shortages meant that the usual summer tea party for children attending the Sunday School at St John’s Church in east Reading had to be called off. Instead, the children were to be given a war savings certificate.

SUNDAY SCHOOL TREAT.

This has always been a very great event in the lives of our Sunday Schools, but this year it will be deprived of its most attractive feature, for in view of the very clear instructions of the Food Controller we cannot give the children a tea. The Sunday School Committee has gone carefully into the question of the form the Treat should take this year so as to give the children a good time and also to give them some compensation for the loss of their tea.

They have decided that the children shall march out to some field as in former years, and that they shall be refreshed with whatever fruit is in season and available, and also that there shall be given to each child a sixpenny War Savings Stamp. They feel that in this way the children will be given a real and lasting equivalent for their tea; those who already belong, as very many of them do, to a War Savings Association will be encouraged to continue, those who do not will be stimulated to join up.

At the same time contributors to the treat will feel that they are helping their country to some small extent, and the children to a very real extent, and will be relieved of the uncomfortable feeling that owing to the embargo on the tea, they are saving their own pockets at the expense of the children.

Reading St. John parish magazine, June 1917 (D/P172/28A/24)

Successful war savings in Mortimer West End

Children at Mortimer West End were contributing to the war effort.

West End – War Savings

The school children have started a War Savings Association and we are glad to hear from Miss Phipps, who is doing all the work in connection with it, that it is proving very successful

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, May1917 (D/P120/28A/14)

Children warned not to waste bread

The head teacher of Warfield Church of England School was keen to pass on messages about saving food and money.

15th May 1917
I attended a war savings and food economy executive meeting last evening and warned the scholars once more this morning on waste of bread.

Warfield CE School log book (C/EL26/3, p. 372)

We are reaching a difficult point in our National struggle

The vicar of Maidenhead St Luke remained reluctant to encourage work on Sundays.

Dear Friends and Parishioners,-

We are reaching a difficult point in our National struggle. The test of endurance is being rigorously enforced upon us. We are called upon to cultivate all available land, to put aside what money we can lend through War Savings Associations and in other ways to the State and to be very economical in our use of food, especially of bread, and finally to do it all cheerfully for the sake of our country

Now, all these things can only be done well by God’s help. Anyone can begin well, but to persevere we want grace from God to strengthen our weakness. Now to get that, we want some leisure to think of God.

So I would urge that while necessary Sunday labour, e.g. on the land at present, must be done, do not let us do any work on Sunday that by forethought we could do in the week, for in the long run men and women can only do a definite amount of work, and if they work needlessly on Sunday it usually means slackness during several days of the week, and body and soul alike demand attention…

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar

C.E.M. FRY

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P181/28A/26)

Fallen leading his men forward with the most devoted courage

Two young men from a Reading parish fought in the Battle of Arras. Their families received very different news as a result.

We shall all join in congratulating Lay-Reader Mr Pugh and Mrs Pugh on the honour won by their son Lieutenant M. Pugh, who has been awarded the Military Cross for his exceedingly gallant and skilful handling of his men in the great attack of Easter Monday. And while our hearts go out to them in their loss, we still cannot but congratulate our dear friends Mr and Mrs Francis Wright on their heroic son Melville, who fell in the same great battle, while leading his men forward with the most devoted courage.

ST JOHN’S WAR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

A good start has been made, 17 members have been enrolled, and already 6 certificate have been purchased out of the subscriptions.

Reading St. John parish magazine, May 1917 (D/P172/28A/24)

Promoting the economical use of foods

The Education Committee was at the forefront of war savings schemes locally. School were also to be used to promote changes in people’s habits with regards to food and cookery given the food shortages resulting from the war.

Report of Berks War Savings Committee

The War Savings Committee submit the following report of their work since the report to the July meeting of the Education Committee:

In accordance with the powers given to them on appointment, the following additional members have been co-opted:

Mr G F Slade
Mr T Skurray

During July and August last… Local Committees for War Savings came into being at Abingdon, Windsor and Maidenhead. Since that date, as a result of public meetings addressed by Miss Fraser of the National War Savings Committee and the Education Secretary, Local Committees have been started at Pangbourne, Thatcham, Newbury, Wallingford, Bracknell, Hungerford and Wokingham. Up to the 31 March, War Savings Associations have been established under the control of these Local Committees as follows:

Abingdon, with 6 Associations

Wallingford, 15 Associations

Pangbourne, 4 Associations

Hungerford, 7 Associations

Newbury, 15 Associations

Thatcham, 5 Associations

Wokingham, 13 Associations

Windsor

Maidenhead, 32 Associations

Bracknell, 13 Associations

As a general rule, these local committees deal only with their immediate areas, but efforts are being made by the National War Savings Committee to secure the extension of their activities to the surrounding parishes; e.g. the Associations of Marcham and Moulsford are affiliated to the Abingdon and Wallingford Local Committees respectively, and the War Savings Associations at the Cookham, Alwyn Road Council School, and Clewer S. Stephen’s School are affiliated to the Maidenhead and Windsor Local Committees respectively, whilst the Earley CE School War Savings Association is affiliated to the Reading Central Committee.

The Associations in connexion with Windsor Castle and the Broadmoor Asylum are affiliated directly with the National Committee.

The number of War Savings Associations (in addition to the above) in the Rural Parishes formed up to the 31 March, is 56; at least one half of these are in connexion with the schools….

The average amount saved by each Association during the quarter January to March, 1917, is £217. These figures do not include the grouped Associations, and relate only to the smaller Rural Associations, where the opportunities to save are less than in the larger centres of population.

The Berks Teachers’ Association officials in January consented to help in the work, and have been successful in arousing and maintaining interest in the movement. Messrs Camburn, James and Fryer, in particular, have done most valuable service.

The National War Savings Committee have been invited by the Ministry of Food to assist in the Food Economy Campaign, and the Berks War Savings Committee have had before them the Central Committee’s suggestions for Local Authorities and War Savings Committees, and in conjunction with the School Management Sub-committee, they have approved the arrangements embodied in the following memorandum:

FOOD CAMPAIGN

The Food Controller, in conjunction with the National War Savings Committee, has suggested that “Under the auspices of the Education Authorities a Conference might be called in every area with a view to enlisting the enthusiastic support and active help of teachers. In the case of ordinary schools, the children will form a means of securing the interest of the parents, and invitations to meetings and special classes can be issued through them. The Domestic Science teachers will be wanted to take charge of such classes.

After consultation with HM Inspector, the following preliminary Scheme has been drafted:

That the Instructresses be instructed to modify their syllabus with a view:

To promote the economical use of foods of which there is an available supply in the locality.

To prepare specimen menus for family use based on the above, with notes on the quantities required to give a proper diet.

To arrange to have the cooked meals on view after the lessons, so that the mothers can see them and ask questions.

To confer with the Head Teachers of the neighbouring schools as to the best way of spreading useful information among the parents of children not in attendance at the Centres, either by inviting visits which could be regarded as object lessons or by co-operating in drawing up a scheme for simple instruction in the schools.

It is to be noted that:

While it is important to keep the full record of all meals and their cost, it is not to be expected that the employment of substitutes will effect any substantial saving in cost, as the price of substitutes must rise as the standard foods become scarce.

It is most important to give guidance as to the feeding of children, as in some families there may be a tendency to reduce the food value of their meals.

Where milk is obtainable, it will be very useful to emphasise its uses in cookery.

It is hoped to hold a conference as soon as the Instructresses have drawn up their Scheme, and it is most important that the scheme should be prepared as soon as possible.

This Conference was held on the 20th April and the preliminary steps have been already taken to start work.

Report of Education Finance Sub-committee

The Sub-committee have arranged with certain employees on Military Service, who were receiving allowances from the Committee, to invest on their behalf part of their allowances in War Savings Certificates.

Reports to Berkshire Education Committee, 28 April 1917 (C/CL/C1/1/20)

Torpedoed off Capetown

More War Savings Associations continued to flourish.

Bracknell

A War Savings Association has been started in connection with the C.E.M.S. sharing-out Club, and there are already about 50 members.

Warfield

Our War Savings Association is thriving; we now have 100 members, thanks to the energy and zeal of our Secretary and Treasurer.

We welcome the return of Mr. T. Bowyer, jun, who was one of the engineers on the Cilicia which was torpedoed off Capetown and now has got back safely to Warfield.

Winkfield District Magazine, April 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/4)

War Savings Associations in Cookham schools

Schools in Cookham were keen to embark on war savings schemes with the children and their parents.

Acting under the advice from the Education Authority, at Reading, War-Savings Associations have been formed in connection with the Schools (Mr. H. Edwards, Hon. Sec.; Mr. James Tuck, Hon. Treasurer). Sums from 1d to 15/6 may be paid in once a week. Miss Lomas has kindly undertaken to issue Coupon Cards and to receive payments from residents and children of Cookham Dean, on Tuesdays, at the Schoolroom, from 4 to 4.30pm, commencing Tuesday, April 3rd. Arrangements for receiving payments are also in force at Cookham Rise and at Cookham School.

Cookham Dean parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P43B/28A/11)

“Help the country and benefit yourself”

St John’s Church in Reading was a latecomer to promoting war savings, but explained its scheme very clearly.

S. JOHN’S WAR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

Though somewhat late in the field, an Association for War Savings has now been started. Early in the month of March a meeting of the parishioners was held with the object of forming the Association for the parish and congregations of the two churches. A committee was formed as follows: the Rev. W Britton, chairman; Mr Haslam, vice-chairman; Miss Winter, treasurer; Mr Penson, secretary, with Miss Ridley and Miss Rundell as assistant secretaries; the other members of the committee being Mr F Winter, rev. R W Morley, Mr Badcock, Mr Hopcraft, Mrs Harrison Jones, Miss Wilkinson, Mrs Herbert Kingham, and Miss Ayres.

Subscriptions will be received at the Princes Street Mission Room, on Monday in each week from 12 noon to 12.45 pm; and also once a month after the District Vistors’ Meeting at 3.15 pm. Subscriptions will also be received at the Albert Road Mission Room, on Tuesday in each week, from 2.30 pm to 3.30 pm. The first day of attendance to receive subscriptions will be Monday April 2nd…

By this scheme, subscribers purchase from the collector a 6d coupon, which is stuck onto a card with 31 spaces for 31 coupons. When all the spaces are filled with coupons value … in total 15s 6d, a certificate for £1 will then be given in exchange for the card. This certificate can be cashed for 15s 6d at any time within twelve months from the date of issue, and for 15ts 9d at the end of one year, at the end of 2 years for 16 s 9d, at the end of 3 years for 17s 9d, at the end of 4 years for 18s 9d, and 5 years for £1.

The advantage of joining this Association is that, if there are say 31 members and they each purchase a 6d coupon, a certificate for 15s 6d is immediately purchased by the secretary. The first member to complete his or her card by having purchased 31 coupons, will receive this certificate, which will be dated some weeks back, viz at the time of purchase by the secretary. By the time it comes into the hands of the member a small sum by way of interest will have accrued…

Note the following points: Saving helps the Country which needs labour and materials for winning the War, and money with which to pay for them.

By saving, later on you will have £1 to spend instead of 15s. 6d. In this way you help the country and benefit yourself. Begin at once and get all the benefit you can.

Reading St. John parish magazine, April 1917 (D/P172/28A/24)

“By each sixpence we kill two birds with one stone, because it helps our Country and ourselves at the same time”

People in Clewer were encouraged to invest in the local War Savings Association.

St. Agnes’, Clewer

Our War Savings Association is going on well. Payments are made at the Mission Room on Mondays from four to five o’clock. New members can join on any Monday: and the numbers are steadily increasing. You become a member by paying one or more sixpences, for which you receive one or more stamps and a card. By each sixpence we kill two birds with one stone, because it helps our Country and ourselves at the same time. If you need the money, you bring back your stamps, and receive for each stamp the sixpence which you paid for it. If you do not need the money, you receive a Certificate when you bring your card with 31 stamps on it. One advantage of joining a War Savings Association is that your Certificate can be bought by an Association before you have finished paying for it, and is therefore worth more to you than it would be otherwise because you get your interest sooner.

Clewer St Andrew parish magazine, March 1917 (D/P39/28A/9)

The gravity of the situation and the imperative need for all to carry out the instructions of the Food Controller

Various kinds of savings were pursued in Winkfield – but there were concerns as to how poorer people would cope.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION.

The Committee organised a Public Meeting in the Parish Room on Friday, March 30th , when there was a large attendance.

Mrs. Boyce gave an excellent address on the Food question, pointing out clearly the gravity of the situation and the imperative need for all to carry out the instructions of the Food Controller, especially as regards to bread; and the point was emphasized that although the labouring man who could not afford so much meat might legitimately take a larger allowance of bread, yet he is now bound to reduce his usual amount by at least one pound a week.

Mr. Creasy also spoke on the importance of War Savings, and proposed the following resolution which was seconded by Mr. Harrison and carried “that all present pledge themselves to co-operate in carrying out the regulations of Lord Devonport and the Authorities on the question of rations to households generally, and to support the War Savings Association to the best of their ability”.

The Committee learning that many Cottagers and Allotment holders found great difficulty in obtaining seed potatoes arranged to buy a ton of seed at once, and Mr. Asher kindly advanced the money to secure them. Most of these potatoes have now been applied for, but a few pecks are still available, and any wishing to buy them should apply to Mr. C. Osman, Winkfield Row.

Arrangements have been made for the saving of waste paper; sacks have been taken by Mr G. Brown, Maiden’s Green, Mr. Eales, Winkfield Street, Mr. C. Osman, Winkfield Row, Mr. Langley, Brock Hill, Mr. Osman, Gorse Place, and also at the Schools, and it is hoped that many will send contributions of waste paper (old letters, circulars, newspapers, but not brown paper) to help fill these sacks which will then be collected and forwarded.

Winkfeld section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/5)

“If you feel satisfied, in all probability one has had too much”

Warfield churchgoers were encouraged to use Lent as a starting point for a restricted diet in the face of shortages.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

I have been asked by the Secretary of the Ministry of Food to bring before my parishioners the imperative necessity of observing voluntarily the spirit and letter of Lord Devonport’s appeal. I urged this at the Morning and Evening Service last Sunday.

As loyal citizens you have been asked to save the country the enormous expense of using compulsion, which means the diversion of labour that could be more profitably employed in other directions. The Church during this season of Lent is calling us to self-control; some have always made a rule of restricting their diet in obedience to the laws of the Church on certain days and will not feel this restriction of food as other people may. We have to leave the table feeling unsatisfied, but that is an excellent thing to do. If you feel satisfied, in all probability one has had too much.

What a great thing it would be if England could accommodate herself to the present circumstances from loyalty rather than under compulsion. It is no excuse for anyone to excuse their excess because others exceed. If one man is a thief and robs his neighbour’s food, it does not make it right for others to do the like. Let us all try from our duty to God as well as our duty to our fellow man to keep under our bodies and bring them into subjection.

Yours faithfully in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY.

* * *

As a result of a preliminary meeting in Bracknell on the subject of War Savings, a branch has been started in Warfield with its headquarters at the School. Mr. Brockbank is Hon. Secretary and Miss Leach Hon. Treasurer. It has already been doing good business. We wish to thank Lady Finlay for her encouragement of the children by giving eightpence towards the sum of 14/- saved.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1917 (D/P151/28A./9/3