The introduction of compulsory service has rather changed the situation

The parish of Burghfield was keeping track of local men serving in the war.

THE WAR

The Roll of Honour

A list kept by the Rector, of those Burghfield men who since the beginning of the war have laid down their lives for their country and the just cause of the Allies, hangs near the reading-desk in the Church.

The full Roll, including those who have offered and been accepted for immediate or deferred service, is kept up to date by Mr. Willink so far as possible, and hangs in the Church Porch. The introduction of compulsory service has rather changed the situation: but he will be glad to receive names of men not already on the Roll but actually serving, together with the exact title of their ship or unit, also notice of any honours or promotions, wounds or deaths.

The list of wounded is growing long. Happily most cases are light. But it should be known by everybody that any disabled man is entitled to free training, if necessary or possible in some trade, and to be helped in finding employment. Information can be obtained at any Post Office. In cases of delay or difficulty in this matter, or in regard to Pensions or Allowances, applications should be made to the Berkshire War Pensions Committee through Mr. or Mrs Willink, who are on the Reading Rural Sub Committee.

Honours

Colonel Sir Wyndham Murray, of Culverlands, formerly C.B whose distinguished services in past times are well known, has been made K.C.B. He has acted as King’s Messenger during the War, and has repeatedly visited the front. He and Lady Murray have also received certain Japanese decorations.

Captain G. O. W. Willink was mentioned in Despatches in May, and has just been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished conduct in August. He has commanded “A” Coy in the 2/4 R. Berks Regt. Since he went out in July 1916, and has seen service in many parts of the line in France and Flanders.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1917 (D/EX725/4)

Advertisements

Appliances for the wounded

People in Burghfield raised money to help the wounded.

Holiday House
A Concert was given on October 19th, in aid of appliances for the wounded.

Burghfield parish magazine, December 1917 (D/EX725/4)

Raid area children

More refugees had fled air raids in London for the safer environs of Maidenhead, while the little ones in Burghfield were helping pick blackberries for soldiers.

King Street School, Maidenhead
15th October 1917

Eight new scholars admitted – all of which were raid area children.

Mrs Bland’s Infants School, Burghfield
October 15th 1917

Holiday given this afternoon in order that children might pick blackberries for the troops. No. of lbs picked 68 ¾.

Log book of King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1); and Mrs Bland’s Infants School, Burghfield (86/SCH/1/1)

Last year’s addresses are not sufficient

The parish of Burghfield was anxious that no soldier’s Christmas gift should be sent to the wrong place.

IMPORTANT
Christmas Parcels for Sailors and Soldiers

Relatives of men on active service are requested, if they wish parcels to be sent out as last year, to send to Mr Willink in good time the “numbers”, ranks and exact names of ship or unit, also the correct address. There are constant changes; and last year’s addresses are not sufficient.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1917 (D/EX725/4)

Parish magazines are especially valuable now

Paper shortages and price rises had meant at least one parish magazine had to stop publication in 1917. But by the autumn it was decided to make the effort to revive it – if only to keep in touch with soldiers from the village.

After 6 months’ interval, the Magazine appears again. Expenses however will be heavier than formerly, and all who approve this revival of our Parish record are invited to support it according to their means. The selling price will be 1d per copy; and donations towards the expenses will be welcome. It must be remembered that a Parish magazine is useful not only as a record of past events, and a mean of giving notice of future ones, but as a channel of communication between all parishioners who can properly avail themselves of it: and that it may be especially valuable now, during the war, for sending local news in compact form to our gallant Burghfield men on active service at home or abroad. Donations and subscriptions may be sent to the Editors, Mr and Mrs Willink, at Hillfields; who will also be glad to receive for publication, extracts from letters by men at sea or land “fronts”, or other written matter of local interest…

HGW & MGW.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1917 (D/EX725/4)

Mothers, wives and widows take on their men’s allotments

Women were picking up the slack at home when it came to tending soldiers’ allotments.

Burghfield and Sulhamstead Horticultural Society’s Annual Show

On Wednesday 29th August, it was a gratifying sight to the promoters of this Show to see so goodly a supply of produce from the cottage gardens and plots; especially when it is remembered that a large number of the gardens and allotments are being cultivated by the wives and mothers of the men who are away serving their country; and by the widows of those who have fallen in the war. The greatest credit is due to them.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1917 (D/EX725/4)

An extra good tea

An enjoyable fete in Burghfield in aid of Red Cross funds attracted some of the recuperating soldiers.

Red Cross Fete

On Thursday, July 12th, a Red Cross Fete was held at Home Close. Sixteen wounded soldiers from Mortimer VAD Hospital were driven over, some in a brake and others in the car kindly lent by Mr and Mrs Willink. The proceedings began by a Rummage Sale and the goods were soon cleared off. There were various side shows. One of the most popular was guessing the name of a doll, 3 guesses for 1d. of course the name had frequently to be changed! Aunt Sally was also much appreciated. The soldiers able to walk about enjoyed helping with these and other games. The weather was perfect and we had tea on the lawn. The soldiers had a table to themselves and an extra good tea….The Misses Gripper’s GFS girls and Sunday School children, also many helpers, had free teas.

After tea, Mr Bulford kindly gave a most excellent Conjuring Entertainment, which the soldiers and everybody much enjoyed. The hearty singing of “God Save The King” brought a happy afternoon to a close, and the soldiers drove away amidst much cheering.

Of course the teas did not pay their way – food being so expensive and so many being given free. By the Rummage Sale and Side Shows we raised about £6. Most of this will go to the Red Cross, but a cauldron of coke has been bought for the Mission Church as a reserve, the cold having been so much felt by the congregation last winter.
We think of giving £2 towards the greatly needed dining hut and recreation room to be erected at Mortimer VAD Hospital.

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1917 (D/EX725/3)

A new opportunity for women

The Women’s Institute seems as though it has been part of English life since time immemorial, but in fact it first came to the country in 1915.

The Women’s Institute

In May of this year, Mrs Watt, who is well known for having started WI in many parts of England on the model of those which have been so successful in Canada, visited Burghfield for the second time and gave an address on “The Work of Women’s Institutes”. Inspired by what she said it was desired to form a branch. The first monthly meeting was held in the Jubilee Room on Thursday June 7th and nearly 40 members were enrolled.

The aims and objects of the Institute are as follow: a) Study home economies [sic], b) provide a centre for educational and social intercourse, and for all local activities, c) encourage home and local industries, d) develop co-operative enterprise, e) stimulate interest in the Agricultural Industry. Each monthly meeting has been well attended and interesting discussions have taken place, also songs and recitations have done much to enliven proceedings. It is hoped that the members will realise that the success of the Institute depends greatly on each member trying to take an active part by giving suggestions, entering into discussions at the various meetings, bearing in mind the words on the membership card, “to do all the good we can, in every way we can, to all the people we can, and above all to study household good in any work which makes the betterment of our home the advancement of our people and the good of our country.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1917 (D/EX725/4)

9 april 1917 Killed leading his men in attack

A senior County Council official who had joined the army was killed in action.

We record with regret … Lt-Col H U H Thorne, formerly of the Shrubberies, killed in action 9th April 1917 …

Colonel Thorne, better known in the parish as Mr Thorne, Deputy Clerk of the County Council, was a keen officer in the Berks Territorials long before the war, and went out as a Captain with the 1/4th Battalion in March 1915 (as also did Captain F A Willink, at present invalided into Reserve). At the time of his death he was in command of a Battalion of the Royal Scots Regiment, and was killed while leading them in attack; he leaves a widow and two young children.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1917 (D/EX725/4)

War charities registered

The County Council’s War Charities Sub-committee had been busy registering local war charities, ranging from bandage making to Christmas gifts for the armed forces.

REGISTRATIONS

Since the last report to the Council the following applications for registration under the War Charities Act, 1916, have been approved, and the Clerk has been instructed to issue certificates and to notify the Charity Commissioners:

No of Cert. Name of Charity Applicant

21 Bracknell War Work Depot (Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild) Mrs Littlewood, Hillside, Bracknell

22 Hanney Xmas Tree Fund for men serving HM Forces H. Leslie Edwards, schoolmaster, Hanney

23 Bracknell Xmas Parcels Fund Canon H. Barnett, Bracknell Vicarage

24 Bradfield District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society C J Haviland, Mead House, Bradfield

25 Bracknell Oaklea Auxiliary Hospital Mrs L A Berwick, Sunny Rise, Bracknell

26 Crowthorne Waste Paper Collection of War Charities Miss H M M Moody, Ferndene, Crowthorne

27 Wargrave Woodclyffe Auxiliary Hospital W. Ryder, The Little House, Wargrave

28 Wokingham Work Guild Mrs H M Lomax, Frog Hall, Wokingham

29 South Easthampstead District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Miss E Monck, Aldworth, Crowthorne

30 Heatherside Auxiliary Military Hospital Miss E Monck, Aldworth, Crowthorne

31 Finchampstead Belgian Refugees S F Smithson, The Old Rectory, Finchampstead

32 Maidenhead Rural North Branch of British Red Cross Society Mrs Carpendale, Pinkneys Green

33 Hungerford Sailors and Soldiers Xmas Parcel Fund E C Townshend, Willows Close, Hungerford

34 Finchampstead Hospital Supply Depot Miss L M Hopkinson, Wyse Hill, Finchampstead

35 Bourton War Hospital Supply Depot Mrs W H Ames, Church Farm House, Bourton

36 Hungerford District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society A S Gladstone, JP, Wallingtons, Hungerford

37 The VAD Red Cross Hospital, Hungerford A S Gladstone, JP, Wallingtons, Hungerford

38 The VAD Red Cross Hospital, Barton Court, Kintbury A S Gladstone, JP, Wallingtons, Hungerford

39 Twyford and Ruscombe War Committee Rev. R W H Acworth, Twyford Vicarage

40 Sonning and Woodley Surgical Requisites Association Mrs C Christie Miller, The Deanery, Sonning

41 Mortimer VAD Hospital Miss F M Wyld, Highbury, Mortimer

42 Waltham St Lawrence Prisoners of War Fund Claude M Warren, Old School House, Shurlock Row

43 Wokingham South Rural District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Mrs A M Western, The Coppice, Finchamapstead

44 Registered in error – subsequently cancelled

45 Ascot Military Hospital Miss Nora Collie, Ascot Military Hospital

46 Wantage District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Miss Gertrude Elliott, Ginge Manor, Wantage

47 Binfield Popeswood Auxiliary Hospital Henry E A Wiggett, White Lodge, Binfield

48 Spencers Wood Local Red Cross Fund Rev. F T Lewarne, Spencers Wood, Reading

49 Faringdon District of Berkshire Branch of British Red Cross Society Henry Procter, Gravel Walk, Faringdon

EXEMPTION CERTIFICATES (to 7 January, 1917, only)

2 Burghfield Sailors and Soldiers Xmas Parcel Fund H G Willink, JP, Hillfields, Burghfield

3 East Challow Xmas Presents Concert Fund Miss E B Vince, Manor Farm, East Challow

4 Kintbury Xmas Presents Fund Mrs Alice G Mahon, Barton Holt, Kintbury

Report of War Charities Sub-committee of BCC, 20 January 1917 C/CL/C1/1/20)

A weekly working party

A Burghfield lady planned a new sewing group to support the wounded.

WORKING PARTY

Mrs George hopes to start a weekly working party at the Jubilee Room on Thursday afternoons at 2.30, commencing on December 7th, at which garments, bandages, etc, will be made for our wounded soldiers and sailors and sent to the Reading War Hospital Supply Depot. All help will be gladly welcomed.

Burghfield parish magazine, December 1916 (D/EX725/3)

Did all the Christmas parcels reach the soldiers last year?

Burghfield parish was planning to send out Christmas gifts to its men serving in the armed forces for a second time.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS

It is particularly requested that parents or wives of bonafide Burghfield men absent from home on service in this country or abroad will send me, if they have not already done so, their present correct address and description, especially if there has been any change since the Roll of Honour was hung in the Church porch last summer. Last year a number of parcels were never acknowledged, and very possibly were never received owing to wrong addresses, and this year it is not proposed to send parcels to men, about whom there is any doubt.

The information ought to reach me not later than December 4th for France, and December 10th for England. Parcels for the East have already gone.

H G Willink, Hillfields.

Burghfield parish magazine, December 1916 (D/EX725/3)

The war on its spiritual side

Burghfield was ready for the National Mission, as it mourned the deaths of two more of its young men.

THE NATIONAL MISSION OF REPENTANCE AND HOPE

Before this is in the hands of our readers we shall all have had the opportunity of hearing “God’s Message to England” from the lips of our special Messenger….

A copy of our Missioner’s letter, together with a list of the special services, has been distributed (I hope) to every house in the parish, but we think it will be well to preserve a copy of the letter in the magazine as a permanent record.

Missioner’s Letter

My dear friends

Our Bishop has given me the great privilege, and laid upon me the great responsibility, of carrying the message of the National Mission to you in Burghfield…

High and low, rich and poor, priest and people, all alike need the message; all alike must be humble, and ready to listen. As with the War, so with this; we are all in it, and none must stand aloof. Indeed it is the War, the War on its spiritual side, the War of a people of God against sin, selfishness, misery, and all that takes the joy and innocence out of a people’s life. And I, though a sinful man not worthy of my office, come to you in God’s name, bearing His word, declaring His promise, bringing His gifts, to help you to do our part at home for our dear native land, as the lads are doing it in other ways abroad.

Yours faithfully in Christ Jesus our Lord

Allen E. Dams

ROLL OF HONOUR

We regret to announce two more deaths during the past month.

1. William Vockins, aged 19, of Pinge Wood. He was severely wounded in the head and sent home to a London hospital, where he died on October 4th. On the previous day the poor boy, helped by his nurse, wrote a few lines to his mother to say that he felt a little better! He was confirmed in our church in March 1913.

2. Frank Pearse, aged 25, the elder son of our district nurse, was killed instantaneously by a shell in France on October 3rd. We remember him as an upright and manly young fellow, a member of our choir and a communicant. He had been in France for 14 months. His mother wishes to express her appreciation of all the sympathy she has rceieved from so many parishioners and friends. R.I.P.

Burghfield parish magazine, November 1916 (D/EX725/3)

Killed in the great Somme advance

Burghfield mourned the loss of one of its own at the Somme.

ROLL OF HONOUR
Killed in action, in France, during the great Somme advance, on 3rd September, 1916, George H. Rapley, aged 24, of the 8th Royal Berks Regiment.

Burghfield parish magazine, October 1916 (D/EX725/3)

“It is unpatriotic and wicked to waste money”

Burghfield parishioners were encouraged to support the war with their savings.

THRIFT

His Majesty’s Government have just appealed to all classes to make a new and special effort to save every sixpence they possibly can and to lend it to the Nation to help to bring about what we all desire – a speedy and victorious termination of the war. We can all surely do a little in this way to help send out the munitions to our brave sailors and soldiers. It should be distinctly understood that it is unpatriotic and wicked to waste money or to spend it carelessly just now.

We can all do our bit to help to bring about a speedy victory by lending our money, and the best way for most of us to do this is to purchase at any Post Office a War Savings Certificate. It costs 15/6 and the Government will pay a high rate of interest for the loan, for they guarantee to return £1 at the end of five years for each 15/6 thus lent. Meanwhile the money is quite safe, and can be drawn at any time if necessity arises, with interest.

During the last winter the Scouts used part of their time in preparing splints for the wounded soldiers, and were able to send 12 hand splints, 8 leg splints, and 16 arm splints.

Burghfield parish magazine, August 1916 (D/EX725/3)