A superb investment

The country was still paying for the war.

Hare Hatch Notes: The Victory Loan

The object of the loan is to place our Country’s finance on a firm foundation. It has a claim hardly less imperious that that of any loan in the last four years. Even the small investor has his chance, by purchasing a war savings certificate, which costs the holder 15/-. H. C. Bond, Esq., generously adds 6d. to each certificate up to 25. In ten years time 26/- is paid for the 15/6 certificate. This is a superb investment. By means of the coupons small sums can be paid weekly as well as larger sums. We strongly advise our readers to save their money and invest it in war savings certificates. Mr. Chenery will gladly give any information that may be desired.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P145/28A/31)

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These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

Fireworks and thanksgiving to God for the victory of the Allied Cause

Crazies Hill Notes

Thanksgiving services were held on the day of the signing of the Armistice, and on the following Sunday, when a large congregation gathered in the Mission Hall to offer praise and thanksgiving to God for the victory of the Allied Cause.

On Saturday, Nov 16th, the scholars of Crazies Hill School assembled in the Hall for Tea by the kindness of Mr. Bond, who generously provided the refreshments. Afterwards Mr. Chenery showed us a varied selection of interesting and amusing lantern slides, which were greatly appreciated by all.

We desire to record our grateful thanks to all who kindly helped to provide a most enjoyable evening for the children.

Many availed themselves of the opportunity offered by Sir William Cain to witness an excellent firework display at the Manor.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

“After four years of war we ought to do what we could to make up to the little people for the many ordinary pleasures of childhood which they had necessarily missed”

The Armistice was greeted with joy and celebration in Wargrave.

Victory

The news that the Armistice was signed reached the Wargrave Post Office at almost 11.20 a.m. on Monday November 11th. The Foreman of the Belfry was ready to summon his Ringers and in a very few minutes the bells of the Parish Church rang joyously. The houses were soon bedecked with flags, the village street became full of people and the wounded soldiers marched in procession with noise and merriment. At noon there was a short service for the few who could assemble, but at 7 p.m. there was a general Service of Thanksgiving to Almighty God and the Parish Church was crowded.

The Authorities have permission for the arrangement of public festivities with bonfires and fireworks to be held within one week only of Armistice day. It seemed right to do all that could be done to impress the event upon the memories of the children, and it was felt that after four years of war we ought to do what we could to make up to the little people for the many ordinary pleasures of childhood which they had necessarily missed. But there was no time to call a public meeting to discuss the matter because the only chance of securing provisions was to make the purchases at once. By the hospitality and spirit of Sir William Cain and Mr. Bond the general entertainment of the whole village was happily arranged.

Mr. and Mrs. Bond entertained all the young people under the ages of 18 to tea. The infants met in their own school and were afterwards taken to join the older children in the Piggott School for a magic lantern entertainment. The Boys’ Club, the Girls’ Club, and the other young people had their tea in the District School. The Crazies Hill Children were well provided for in the Mission Hall and Mr. Chenery showed them a good exhibition of lantern slides.

There were many kind helpers and a good many visitors to the tea parties. At each place of entertainment there were a few words spoken to help impress the memories of the young people with the greatness of the occasion and our cause for thankfulness. Mr. Bond, Mr. Huggins, and the Vicar all said something at one place or another, and everywhere there were loud cheers for the host and hostess. It was delightful to see the enjoyment of the children.

The Fireworks were announced to commence at 8 p.m., at the Manor, and the entertainment was for all parishioners. It was a most magnificent display with many set pieces, a host of rockets and a bonfire at the last. The show was arranged at the top of the park just below the garden terrace. A great crowd of people thronged the lawns and overflowed to the grass beyond.

At the conclusion of the fireworks, when the people were gathered to the bonfire, the Vicar, supported by Mr. Bond, expressed the thanks of the parish to Sir William and Lady Cain. Everyone understood that when both time and supply were so limited there could have been no entertainment at all unless someone had acted at once. Sir William Cain has always shown that he has the welfare of Wargrave in mind and on this occasion he acted immediately, taking the whole burden upon himself and supplying an entertainment which no combined effort could have surpassed. The cheers of the guests must have done something to show how much the hospitality was appreciated, and it would indeed be difficult to think of anything that could have been devised that would have been more calculated to impress the memories of the young people with the glorious event of this happy victory than the entertainment which they enjoyed at Wargrave.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Children’s eyes glistened when they heard that chocolate cake was more wholesome and more nutritious than bread

Food shortages led to attempts to teach working class somen new methods of food preparation. Hayboxes acted as a combination of slow-cooker and thermos flask, to allow a cooked dinner to stay hot all day, and also saved on fuel.

A meeting was held on November 5th, at the Old Schoolroom at which were present Mrs. Bennett, Vice-President; Mrs. Noble, Hon. Sec.; Mrs. Wedderburn; Mrs. Chenery, Hon. Treasurer; and a large attendance, to bear a lecture given by Mrs. Hallam on Children’s Diet and Pocket Lunches. The relative values of various foods were fully explained, and the mothers were strongly urged to alter their methods of prearing food and to adopt the advice of London Food Committee whose President, Mrs. Peel, supplied practical instructions.

Several children came early and heard the lecture and their eyes glistened when they heard that chocolate cake (made with cocoa) and madeira cake, were more wholesome and more nutritious than bread – and that hot potatoes and cheese formed a nourishing meal, without meat.

The wives were advised to send out their husbands provided with small portable hayboxes, that they might have a hot dinner in the middle of the day during the cold winter months.

The Lecture was received with warm approbation.

A generous tea followed, given by Mrs. Bennett – assisted by Mrs. Chenery and other helpers.

Wargrave parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

Spare a cabbage a week

Wargrve gardeners were asked to help the parish war hospital.

Woodclyffe Auxiliary Hospital

The Hospital was reopened on September 9th after being closed for three weeks. There is every prospect of its being kept full during the winter months.

The Quartermaster will be most thankful for gifts of eggs which are greatly needed for the wounded soldiers.

Will everyone please give one a week during the winter months?

Vegetables of all kinds are also always wanted and will be welcomed in large or small quantities. If allotment holders and cottage gardeners will only spare one cabbage, a couple of carrots or parsnips, or several onions &c. each week and send them to Mr. F. Pope, Victoria Road, or Mr. A. Chenery, Hare Hatch, they will be delivered at the Hospital several times a week.

Many small gifts will make a considerable quantity in a very short time.

Wargrave parish magazine, October 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

More valuable service in the national cause

Hare Hatch people were pleased that one local man would not go to war.

Hare Hatch Notes

We are very glad indeed that we shall continue to have the advantage of Mr. Chenery’s work in Hare Hatch. He was classed Grade II. The Churchwardens were of the opinion that if he were unfit for the fighting line he should appeal to the Tribunal, in order that the Authorities might understand the work he is now doing and decide whether there was any other direction in which he could render more valuable service in the national cause.

The Tribunal decided that Mr. Chenery should continue the good work which he is now doing.

Wargrave parish magazine, August 1918 (D/P145/28A/31)

A call for economical but wholesome recipes

The vicar of Wargrave was at the heart of the village’s flourishing War Savings Association, and also efforts to encourage food to be produced locally. The March issue of the parish magazine announced:

War Savings and War Rations

A meeting of the Wargrave War Savings Association will be held on Saturday, March 10th at 7 .p.m., in the Iron Church Building. All Parishioners are most cordially invited to attend. The subject of War Rations will also be discussed.

The total sum paid into the Secretary’s hands up to February 26th, amounts to £1014 9s. 6d., which has been extended in the purchase of 726 Certificates value £1 five years hence; 21 value £12 five years hence: and 13 value £25 five years hence.

Bonus

There is no doubt that the Chairman’s kind gift of one sixpenny coupon on every Certificate up to ten has proved a strong inducement to save that number. And he is so pleased with the response that he has most generously determined to extend his offer up to 25 Certificates for each person.

Vicarage Office Hours

On Saturdays 9.30-10.30 .a.m. and 5.30-6.30 .p.m. the Parish Room is open for War Savings Business.

Certificates due members may then be obtained, and Certificates may be purchased.

During the days of the War Loan the Vicar was glad to welcome War Savings business on any day and at any time when he was at home, but he must now ask members to be more particular in the observance of Office Hours.

Money may be sent to the Vicar if accompanied with a clear statement of Certificates required, full names and sufficient postal address.

The meeting duly took place:

War Savings Association

A very well attended Meeting was held on Saturday, March 10th, in the Iron Church Building. Mr. Bond presided and gave an address on Food Production and War Rations.

A Committee was appointed for Food Production of which Mrs. Bulkeley is Chairman, supported by Mrs. Hinton, Miss. Rhodes, and Messrs. Butcher, Chenery, Crisp and Pope.

A good deal of work has already been done in organising parties to dig, and in providing allotments and seed potatoes for those who want them.

A Committee was also appointed for Food Economy in charge of Mrs. Winter, supported by Mrs. Bennett, Mrs. Cain, Mrs. Chenery, and Mrs. Hermon.

It is hoped that the committee may give much help in disseminating information and enlisting support. Mrs. Winter will be very grateful for any economical recipes which have proved wholesome and successful. These recipes will be exhibited in the Parish Room.

Wargrave parish magazine, March and April 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

“Everyone can help to win the war by lending money to the Government”

The people of Wargrave were impressed by the call to help the war effort by placing their personal savings in a Government scheme.

War Savings Association

The Wargrave War Savings Association was very successfully started at a well attended Public Meeting on Tuesday, January 9th, 1917.

Mr. Henry Bond presided, and was supported by Mr. W. C. F. Anderson, Hon. Secretary for Berks, Mr. G. G. Phillimore, who is Secretary for a local branch, and the Vicar.

The Speakers explained that everyone can help to win the war by lending money to the Government. The Government gives 5 per cent, interest, so everyone can help himself at the same time as he helps the country. The man who saves now is helping our soldiers by going without something himself. The less we consume from over the seas, the more room we leave in the ships to carry necessities and comforts for our soldiers.

A resolution to form a Wargrave War Savings Association was unanimously passed.

Mr. Henry Bond was unanimously elected Chairman and Hon. Treasurer. The Vicar was elected Hon. Secretary.

The following were elected to the Committee of Management, with power to add to their number.

Wargrave: Mrs. Groves, Messrs. H. Butcher, W.H. Easterling, F.W. Headington, and E. Stokes.
Hare Hatch: Mrs. Oliver Young, Messrs. A. E. Chenery and A.E. Huggins.
Crazies Hill: Messrs. J.T. Griffin and T. Moore, the Rev. W.G. Smylie.

The Office of the Association is at the Vicarage. The Certificate if affiliation to the National War Savings Committee, the Rules and Statements of Accounts will be exhibited in the Parish Room.

Office Hours at Vicarage, SATURDAYS 9.30- 10.30 a.m. and 5.30-6.30 p.m.

Wargrave parish magazine, February 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Coal supply uncertain

Coal Clubs were common in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and often based at churches. They enabled the poor to save money in a structured way and to get cheaper prices for bulk orders of fuel by banding together. But the shortages due to the war put paid to at least some of them.

The Coal Clubs

All the Coal Clubs in the parish must be closed as from the end of September. We are advised that this is necessary on account of the uncertainty of supply later on. Members are specially warned of the necessity of making arrangements to receive their coal as soon as their coal merchants can deliver it.

Members who have earned full bonus to the end of September, will be given the bonus for the remaining months.

Cards not yet made up must be sent in at once, to Miss Sturges, Miss Stanton, or Mr. Chenery as the case may be.

Wargrave parish magazine, October 1916 (D/P145/28A/31)

Former bellringers in the services to get pride of place in Wargrave

When the war broke out, the parish Wargrave had been in a state of disarray, as the church had been burnt down by an arsonist (believed to be a suffragette) earlier in 1914. By the time it had been repaired in 1915, the bellringing team had been broken up. It was revived in August 1915, with provision for those former bellringers who had joined up to be regarded as founder members of the new team.

The Belfry

A Public Meeting of Parishioners interested in bells and bell-ringing was summoned by the Vicar for Thursday, August 5th, and there was a good attendance.

The Vicar reminded the meeting that the Wargrave Ringers were in a peculiar position at the time of his institution in Nov. 1914.
Several had shown their patriotism by enlisting for the great war, the bells were broken and melted, the belfry was burned out, and there had been no ringing since the fire on Whitsunday 1914.

The Vicar, Churchwardens, and Ringers had then decided, in meeting, that after the gathering of the usual Christmas gifts from the parish, the Belfry should be dissolved and that it should make an entirely new beginning when the new bells were hung.

The eight bells had now been hung by Messrs Mears and Stainbank. A silencing apparatus was being fitted and the bells could be rung, without being heard outside the Belfry, as soon as the Architect could allow it.

It therefore seemed time to restart a Band of Ringers. The meeting was summoned in order that Ringers might be proposed and elected. When the Belfry Band was thus constituted the Belfry Members would proceed to consider their Rules. But certain preliminary rules should be passed by the whole meeting, to define the range and qualification of membership.

It was therefore resolved:
I. That the Society shall be called ‘The Wargrave Belfry and shall belong to the Sonning Branch of the Oxford Diocesan Guild of Church Bell-Ringers’, and as such shall be subject to its rules.
II. All members must be Communicants of the Church of England.
III. There shall be Ex-Officio Members, Honorary Members, and Ringing Members.

Members were then elected. It was resolved ‘That all former Members of the Belfry at present serving their Country in Navy or Army be elected Ringing Members and their names be entered first on the list to be fixed in the Belfry.’

The Following were then elected:-
Ex-Officio Members: The Vicar, Chairman and the two Churchwardens.
Honorary Members: Mrs Groves, Mrs Victor Rhodes, Miss Rhodes, Miss Sturges, Rev. A. H. Austen Leigh, Rev. W. G. Smylie, Messers H.C. Bond, A. E. Chenery and V. Wyatt.
Ringing Members: Messers G. Bailiss, W. Burrows, W. R. Fuller, W. Elsley, A. Guy, W. H. Easterling, H. Cox, S. C. Nash, J. F. Neighbour, F. Pocock, W. W. Hill, E. Thatcher.
Probationers: Messers Cecil Burrows, H. Herbert, Charles Fuller.

The Belfry Members then proceeded to pass Rules:-
All Members are expected to attend Church once on a Sunday.
A Foreman and Deputy Foreman shall be elected annually by the Belfry subject to the Vicar’s approval.
All members shall have the right of entry to the Belfry whenever open.
Probationers shall not be Members of the Belfry, but shall be admitted as Members at all times by leave of the Belfry as decided by a majority.
No one but a member, or a member of the Diocesan Guild, shall be allowed in the Belfry except by the introduction of a member, with the permission of the Foreman or Leader for the day.
Honorary Members shall pay a subscription of not less than 2/6 annually.
A list of Ringing Members shall be hung up in the Ringing Chamber, and the selection of the band for each occasion shall be made by the Foreman, who is responsible for a sufficient side.
No person except the Foreman or Leader or such person as shall be requested by the Foreman or Leader to do so shall interfere or criticise during the ringing, and all present in the Belfry shall at all times conform to the wishes of the Foreman or his deputy duly appointed.
Ringing shall always begin with a collect to be said by the Foreman or his deputy, and the Versicle ‘Praise ye the Lord’ with the response ‘The Lord’s name be praised.’
The Bells shall be rung on the following days [the days to be fixed presently].
All Ringing Members shall attend a weekly practice during the winter months; any member unable to be present shall give notice to the Foreman.
No member shall be eligible for Sunday duty until he can keep his place in ringing rounds on 8 bells for 5 consecutive minutes. Any Ringing Member unable to be present at future meetings shall give notice to the Foreman (or his deputy for the time being).
Any Ringing Member who is absent from the Belfry for a space of one month, without having thus previously given notice, shall be considered to have ceased to be a Member of the Belfry, unless he elect to become an Honorary Member.
Any money received by Subscriptions or Donations shall be paid into the ‘Belfry Fund’, of which the Treasurers shall be the Foreman and the Vicar’s Churchwarden, and shall be spent in accordance with resolution at the Annual Meeting held in [month to be fixed presently]. The Fund will be available for small expenses, for excursions to other Towers, a pleasure outing, etc., etc. If money be voted for a pleasure outing, those unable to go through ill-health or other unavoidable cause shall be entitled to an equivalent share.
All money received for Weddings, Funerals, or extraordinary occasions shall be paid into the Belfry Fund, but shall form a separate account. This special account shall be divided at the end of the year among the Members of the Belfry who attended on those occasions and shall be paid out at the Annual Meeting. Notice shall be given to all the Belfry Members when such special occasion arises, and any case of sickness shall be considered by the Belfry.
The Fees to be paid shall not be less than £5 for a day’s ringing; £2 2s. 0d. for two Peals; £1 1s.0d. for a single Peal.
Any Band of Ringers desiring to use the Wargrave Belfry must apply to the Foreman, who will apply to the Vicar at least so long beforehand as shall allow an answer to be sent by post. No more than six such applications shall be entertained by the Foreman in any one year.
The Foreman shall be responsible for keeping order in the Belfry and shall have full control and authority during the time of ringing. Ringers shall obey his orders so that there be no brawling or unseemly argument: And if any Ringer have just cause for complaint he shall appeal to the vicar and shall give the Foreman notice of his intension to do so.
It shall be the duty of the Foreman to keep a record of all attendances during the year.
Any Member wishing to move a resolution at the Annual Meeting shall place a written notice in the ringing chamber 7 days before the meeting. No alteration or addition shall be made to these rules except at an Annual Meeting after due notice.
The Ringers on all occasions shall adhere to the above Rules or forfeit their appointment.

Mr W. J. Fuller has been elected Foreman and Mr. A. Guy, Deputy Foreman.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

How the Church of England Men’s Society can help those at the Front

The Church of England Men’s Society was a national church organisation whose many local branches provided a social and fellowship meeting for men. Founded in 1899, it existed up until 1985.

C.E.M.S

The 5th Annual Conference of the Oxford Diocesan Union of the Church of England Men’s Society was held at Slough on Saturday, June 19th. The Wargrave Branch elected Messrs. Chenery and Coleby as delegates and they attended each of the Sessions. The Bishop of Oxford presided and was supported by members of the Council. After a cordial welcome from the Chairman of the Slough District Council, the Bishop referred to matters that were to be discussed during the day…

In the afternoon the late Secretary (Rev. Ernest F. Smith) brought forward several ways in which the C.E.M.S can help with soldiers who are serving at the Front and this led to a good discussion…

The Slough Federation most kindly provided tea for the Delegates. A Service of Intercession took place in St Paul’s Church and was attended by a large number of members of the Conference.

Wargrave parish magazine, July 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)