All the names of those who had fallen should be inscribed on the Memorial

Once the joy and relief of peace was over, it was time to reflect soberly on our losses.

WAR MEMORIAL

A committee meeting was held at Sulhamstead House on Saturday, November 1st, at 6 pm. The accounts of the Peace Celebrations were audited and found correct, showing a balance in hand of £23.9s.3d.

It was unanimously decided that this balance should be carried to the fund for erecting the “War Memorial” as arranged at the Public Meeting held on Monday, July 8th. The following resolutions were carried unanimously:

1. That the balance of £23.9s.3d should be carried to the fund called the “War Memorial Fund”, and used in the erection of a Memorial.

2. That the Rev. A K P Shepherd be appointed Treasurer.

3. That a house-to-house collection for the fund should be made.

4. That all the names of those who had fallen should be inscribed on the Memorial.

5. That a special committee should be appointed to carry out these arrangements, consisting of the present Finance Committee and the following: Mr Flitter, Mr Jones, Mrs Palmer, Mrs Shepherd, Mr Tyser, Mr Wells.

6. A vote of thanks to Sir George and Lady Watson for allowing the Sports and celebrations to be held in their grounds, and for also allowing Sulhamstead House to be used for the tea.

7. A vote of thanks to the staff at Sulhamstead House for their hard work on Peace Day.

8. A vote of thanks to Mr Clay, the Secretary.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, December 1919 (D/EX725/4)

Almost every available man has gone to this cruel war

Almost every man from Stratfield Mortimer and Mortimer West End who could realistically serve had answered the country’s call by June 1915, the parish magazine attested. Some had paid the ultimate price.

Men with the Colours

To the lists already published there should now be added: James Flitter and Harry White, K.R.R., Ernest Merrick, M.T., A.S.C., and Herbert West, Gunner R.F.A. The last named should have been on the original list; he is now, we regret to say, in hospital at Warrington, having been seriously wounded at Hill 60 in arms and legs during the first fierce fight for that position.

We cannot refrain from reprinting the following words of Mr. Raymond Asquith, the Prime Minister’s eldest son, on the subject of his training with the 16th City of London Regiment:

“We are trying very hard to fit ourselves in the shortest possible time to kill the largest number of Germans. After recent demonstrations of their ferocious and bestial cruelty, it must be most difficult for any man of suitable age and health to apply himself to any other purpose.”

West End

This cruel war is bringing home to us day by day the awful miseries and troubles which overtake the innocent as a result of the sins of men and nations. One of the very saddest ways in which our parish has come to learn it is in the death of Captain Field, and all our hearts go out in sympathy to his family, and especially to the mother, who through long months of wearing anxiety has given us an example of the pluck and courage which the mothers of England are showing everywhere to-day. It is a bitter end after being taken prisoner while tending the wounded. May his soul rest in peace and may we be given grace to follow his example in doing our duty to our neighbour and our country.

There are several names to be added to our Roll of Honour of those serving their King and Country and our parish may now be considered to have given up almost every available man.

Stratfield Mortimer parish magazine, June 1915 (D/P120/28A/14)